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Found 71 result(s)
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint program of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), is a nationwide oncology outcomes database for more than 1,500 Commission-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Some 70 percent of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer in the United States are captured at the institutional level and reported to the NCDB. The NCDB, begun in 1989, now contains approximately 29 million records from hospital cancer registries across the United States. Data on all types of cancer are tracked and analyzed. These data are used to explore trends in cancer care, to create regional and state benchmarks for participating hospitals, and to serve as the basis for quality improvement.
BindingDB is a public, web-accessible database of measured binding affinities, focusing chiefly on the interactions of proteins considered to be candidate drug-targets with ligands that are small, drug-like molecules. BindingDB supports medicinal chemistry and drug discovery via literature awareness and development of structure-activity relations (SAR and QSAR); validation of computational chemistry and molecular modeling approaches such as docking, scoring and free energy methods; chemical biology and chemical genomics; and basic studies of the physical chemistry of molecular recognition. BindingDB also includes a small collection of host-guest binding data of interest to chemists studying supramolecular systems. The data collection derives from a variety of measurement techniques, including enzyme inhibition and kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and radioligand and competition assays. BindingDB includes data extracted from the literature by the BindingDB project, selected PubChem confirmatory BioAssays, and ChEMBL entries for which a well defined protein target ("TARGET_TYPE='PROTEIN'") is provided. Data extracted by BindingDB typically includes more details regarding experimental conditions, etc
SSDA Dataverse is one of the archiving opportunities of SSDA, the others are: Data can be archived by SSDA itself (http://dataarchives.ss.ucla.edu/index.html) or by ICPSR or by UCLA Library or by California Digital Library. The Social Science Data Archives serves the UCLA campus as an archive of faculty and graduate student survey research. We provide long term storage of data files and documentation. We ensure that the data are useable in the future by migrating files to new operating systems. We follow government standards and archival best practices. The mission of the Social Science Data Archive has been and continues to be to provide a foundation for social science research with faculty support throughout an entire research project involving original data collection or the reuse of publicly available studies. Data Archive staff and researchers work as partners throughout all stages of the research process, beginning when a hypothesis or area of study is being developed, during grant and funding activities, while data collection and/or analysis is ongoing, and finally in long term preservation of research results. Our role is to provide a collaborative environment where the focus is on understanding the nature and scope of research approach and management of research output throughout the entire life cycle of the project. Instructional support, especially support that links research with instruction is also a mainstay of operations.
a collection of data at Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) supporting research that helps people make more informed decisions and improves the quality of health care services. The portal contains U.S.Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) and other sources concerning cost, quality, accesibility and evaluation of healthcare and medical insurance.
The Allen Brain Atlas provides a unique online public resource integrating extensive gene expression data, connectivity data and neuroanatomical information with powerful search and viewing tools for the adult and developing brain in mouse, human and non-human primate
The Ontology Lookup Service (OLS) is a repository for biomedical ontologies that aims to provide a single point of access to the latest ontology versions. The user can browse the ontologies through the website as well as programmatically via the OLS API. The OLS provides a web service interface to query multiple ontologies from a single location with a unified output format.The OLS can integrate any ontology available in the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) format. The OLS is an open source project hosted on Google Code.
The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between a group of major public interaction data providers who have agreed to share curation effort and develop and work to a single set of curation rules when capturing data from both directly deposited interaction data or from publications in peer-reviewed journals, capture full details of an interaction in a “deep” curation model, perform a complete curation of all protein-protein interactions experimentally demonstrated within a publication, make these interaction available in a single search interface on a common website, provide the data in standards compliant download formats, make all IMEx records freely accessible under the Creative Commons Attribution License
Reactome is a manually curated, peer-reviewed pathway database, annotated by expert biologists and cross-referenced to bioinformatics databases. Its aim is to share information in the visual representations of biological pathways in a computationally accessible format. Pathway annotations are authored by expert biologists, in collaboration with Reactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to many bioinformatics databases. These include NCBI Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the UCSC and HapMap Genome Browsers, the KEGG Compound and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and Gene Ontology.
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The Portal is intended to be used as catalog of datasets published by ministries/ department/ organizations of Government of India for public use, in order to enhance transparency in the functioning of the Government as well as to make innovative visualization of dataset. This National Data Portal is being updated frequently to make it as accessible as possible and completely accessible to all irrespective of physical challenges or technology.
The Cancer Imaging Archive is a freely accessible repository containing medical images and supporting data from cancer patients. Images are stored in DICOM file format. The images are organized as “Collections”, typically patients related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality (MRI, CT, etc) or research focus. Search functionality allows users to query across Collections or within them to filter out only the data they are most interested in.
EMPIAR, the Electron Microscopy Public Image Archive, is a public resource for raw, 2D electron microscopy images. Here, you can browse, upload, download and reprocess the thousands of raw, 2D images used to build a 3D structure. The purpose of EMPIAR is to provide an easy access to the state-of-the-art raw data to facilitate methods development and validation, which will lead to better 3D structures. It complements the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB), where 3D images are stored, and uses the fault-tolerant Aspera platform for data transfers
The NCI's Genomic Data Commons (GDC) provides the cancer research community with a unified data repository that enables data sharing across cancer genomic studies in support of precision medicine. The GDC obtains validated datasets from NCI programs in which the strategies for tissue collection couples quantity with high quality. Tools are provided to guide data submissions by researchers and institutions.
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of Web-based neuroscience resources: data, materials, and tools accessible via any computer connected to the Internet. An initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NIF advances neuroscience research by enabling discovery and access to public research data and tools worldwide through an open source, networked environment.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://mytardis.massive.org.au/ and http://vera183.its.monash.edu.au/public_data/ and see 'remarks'.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information