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Launched in December 2013, Gaia is destined to create the most accurate map yet of the Milky Way. By making accurate measurements of the positions and motions of stars in the Milky Way, it will answer questions about the origin and evolution of our home galaxy. The first data release (2016) contains three-dimensional positions and two-dimensional motions of a subset of two million stars. The second data release (2018) increases that number to over 1.6 Billion. Gaia’s measurements are as precise as planned, paving the way to a better understanding of our galaxy and its neighborhood. The AIP hosts the Gaia data as one of the external data centers along with the main Gaia archive maintained by ESAC and provides access to the Gaia data releases as part of Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC).
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The CosmoSim database provides results from cosmological simulations performed within different projects: the MultiDark and Bolshoi project, and the CLUES project. The CosmoSim webpage provides access to several cosmological simulations, with a separate database for each simulation. Simulations overview: https://www.cosmosim.org/cms/simulations/simulations-overview/ . CosmoSim is a contribution to the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory.
The main goal of the CLUES-project is to provide constrained simulations of the local universe designed to be used as a numerical laboratory of the current paradigm. The simulations will be used for unprecedented analysis of the complex dark matter and gasdynamical processes which govern the formation of galaxies. The predictions of these experiments can be easily compared with the detailed observations of our galactic neighborhood. Some of the CLUES data is now publicly available via the CosmoSim database (https://www.cosmosim.org/). This includes AHF halo catalogues from the Box 64, WMAP3 resimulations of the Local Group with 40963 particle resolution.
This MultiDark application is now integrated into CosmoSim (https://www.cosmosim.org/), all data and much more is available there. The old MultiDark server is no longer available. The MultiDark database provides results from cosmological simulations performed within the MultiDark project. This database can be queried by entering SQL statements directly into the Query Form. The access to that form and thus access to the public & private databases is password protected.
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German astronomical observatories own considerable collection of photographic plates. While these observations lead to significant discoveries in the past, they are also of interest for scientists today and in the future. In particular, for the study of long-term variability of many types of stars, these measurements are of immense scientific value. There are about 85000 plates in the archives of Hamburger Sternwarte, Dr. Karl Remeis-Sternwarte Bamberg, and Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP). The plates are digitized with high-resolution flatbed scanners. In addition, the corresponding plate envelopes and observation logbooks are digitized, and further metadata are entered into the database. The work is carried out within the project “Digitalisierung astronomischer Fotoplatten und ihre Integration in das internationale Virtual Observatory”, which is funded by the DFG.
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Publication of scans of photographic plates from the so-called "Potsdam zone" of the Carte du Ciel project (32 deg to 39 deg). A total of 977 plates of 2 square degree sky regions was observed and recorded between 1913 to 1924. Since Potsdam Observatory ended participation in the Carte du Ciel project, these observations were so far not analysed or published. Plates were scanned in by a flat bed scanner in 2007-2008. Limitations in astrometric precision as well are to be expected, and specific observational restrains apply, such as multiple exposures on certain plates (see literature)
We present the MUSE-Wide survey, a blind, 3D spectroscopic survey in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and CANDELS/COSMOS regions. Each MUSE-Wide pointing has a depth of 1 hour and hence targets more extreme and more luminous objects over 10 times the area of the MUSE-Deep fields (Bacon et al. 2017). The legacy value of MUSE-Wide lies in providing "spectroscopy of everything" without photometric pre-selection. We describe the data reduction, post-processing and PSF characterization of the first 44 CANDELS/GOODS-S MUSE-Wide pointings released with this publication. Using a 3D matched filtering approach we detected 1,602 emission line sources, including 479 Lyman-α (Lya) emitting galaxies with redshifts 2.9≲z≲6.3. We cross-match the emission line sources to existing photometric catalogs, finding almost complete agreement in redshifts and stellar masses for our low redshift (z < 1.5) emitters. At high redshift, we only find ~55% matches to photometric catalogs. We encounter a higher outlier rate and a systematic offset of Δz≃0.2 when comparing our MUSE redshifts with photometric redshifts. Cross-matching the emission line sources with X-ray catalogs from the Chandra Deep Field South, we find 127 matches, including 10 objects with no prior spectroscopic identification. Stacking X-ray images centered on our Lya emitters yielded no signal; the Lya population is not dominated by even low luminosity AGN. A total of 9,205 photometrically selected objects from the CANDELS survey lie in the MUSE-Wide footprint, which we provide optimally extracted 1D spectra of. We are able to determine the spectroscopic redshift of 98% of 772 photometrically selected galaxies brighter than 24th F775W magnitude. All the data in the first data release - datacubes, catalogs, extracted spectra, maps - are available at the website.
RAVE (RAdial Velocity Experiment) is a multi-fiber spectroscopic astronomical survey of stars in the Milky Way using the 1.2-m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE collaboration consists of researchers from over 20 institutions around the world and is coordinated by the Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam. As a southern hemisphere survey covering 20,000 square degrees of the sky, RAVE's primary aim is to derive the radial velocity of stars from the observed spectra. Additional information is also derived such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, photometric parallax and elemental abundance data for the stars. The survey represents a giant leap forward in our understanding of our own Milky Way galaxy; with RAVE's vast stellar kinematic database the structure, formation and evolution of our Galaxy can be studied.
On June 1, 1990 the German X-ray observatory ROSAT started its mission to open a new era in X-ray astronomy. Doubtless, this is the most ambitious project realized up to now in the short history of this young astronomical discipline. Equipped with the largest imaging X-ray telescope ever inserted into an earth orbit ROSAT has provided a tremendous amount of new scientific data and insights.
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy. Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008; SDSS-III 2008-2014; SDSS-IV 2013 ongoing), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. DSS-IV is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS Collaboration including the Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Mellon University, the Chilean Participation Group, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, The Johns Hopkins University, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU) / University of Tokyo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Leibniz Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (MPA Garching), Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA Heidelberg), National Astronomical Observatory of China, New Mexico State University, New York University, The Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, United Kingdom Participation Group, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, University of Arizona, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Portsmouth, University of Utah, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin, Vanderbilt University, and Yale University.