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Found 38 result(s)
The IMSR is a searchable online database of mouse strains, stocks, and mutant ES cell lines available worldwide, including inbred, mutant, and genetically engineered strains. The goal of the IMSR is to assist the international scientific community in locating and obtaining mouse resources for research. Note that the data content found in the IMSR is as supplied by strain repository holders. For each strain or cell line listed in the IMSR, users can obtain information about: Where that resource is available (Repository Site); What state(s) the resource is available as (e.g. live, cryopreserved embryo or germplasm, ES cells); Links to descriptive information about a strain or ES cell line; Links to mutant alleles carried by a strain or ES cell line; Links for ordering a strain or ES cell line from a Repository; Links for contacting the Repository to send a query
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
The UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website gathers two categories of content managed by the Library: library collections (including digitized versions of selected collections covering topics such as art, film, music, history and anthropology) and research data collections (including research data generated by UC San Diego researchers).
DEG hosts records of currently available essential genomic elements, such as protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs, among bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Essential genes in a bacterium constitute a minimal genome, forming a set of functional modules, which play key roles in the emerging field, synthetic biology.
The Environmental Data Initiative Repository concentrates on studies of ecological processes that play out at time scales spanning decades to centuries including those of the NSF Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the NSF Macrosystems Biology Program, the NSF Long Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) program, the Organization of Biological Field Stations, and others. The repository hosts data that provide a context to evaluate the nature and pace of ecological change, to interpret its effects, and to forecast the range of future biological responses to change.
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, documents or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. In the following cases, a direct data upload into the ETH Data Archive though, has to be considered: - Upload and registration of software code according to ETH transfer’s requirements for Software Disclosure. - A substantial number of files, have to be regularly submitted for long-term archiving and/or publishing and browser-based upload is not an option: the ETH Data Archive may offer automated data and metadata transfers from source applications (e.g. from a LIMS) via API. - Files for a project on a local computer have to be collected and metadata has to be added before uploading the data to the ETH Data Archive: -- we provide you with the local file editor docuteam packer. Docuteam packer allows to structure, describe, and organise data for an upload into the ETH Data Archive and the depositor decides when submission is due.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
This site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers, and policy makers in the hopes of better health outcomes for all. In a recent article, Todd Park, United States Chief Technology Officer, captured the essence of what the Health Data Initiative is all about and why our efforts here are so important.
The Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database provides access to information about transmembrane proteins that exist under different conformations, with three primary subfamilies: the cys-loop superfamily, the ATP gated channels superfamily, and the glutamate activated cationic channels superfamily.**The development of the Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database was started in 1994, as part of Le Novère's work on the phylogeny of those receptors' subunits. It grew into a serious data resource, that served the community at large. However, it is not actively maintained anymore. In addition, bioinformatics technology evolved a lot over the last two decades, so that scientists can now generate quickly customised databases from trustworthy primary data resources. Therefore, we decided to officialy freeze the data resource. The resource will not disappear, and all the information and links will stay there. But people should not consider it as an up-to-date trustable resource.** (Clinical trials) is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world.
The DRKS is an open access online register for clinical trials conducted in Germany, which allows all users to search, register and share information on clinical trials.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
GallusReactome is a free, online, open-source, curated resource of core pathways and reactions in chicken biology. Information is authored by expert biological researchers, maintained by the GallusReactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to the NCBI Entrez Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the KEGG and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and the Gene Ontology (GO).
PhytoPath is a new bioinformatics resource that integrates genome-scale data from important plant pathogen species with literature-curated information about the phenotypes of host infection. Using the Ensembl Genomes browser, it provides access to complete genome assembly and gene models of priority crop and model-fungal, oomycete and bacterial phytopathogens. PhytoPath also links genes to disease progression using data from the curated PHI-base resource. PhytoPath portal is a joint project bringing together Ensembl Genomes with PHI-base, a community-curated resource describing the role of genes in pathogenic infection. PhytoPath provides access to genomic and phentoypic data from fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, and has enabled a considerable increase in the coverage of phytopathogen genomes in Ensembl Fungi and Ensembl Protists. PhytoPath also provides enhanced searching of the PHI-base resource as well as the fungi and protists in Ensembl Genomes.
The DSMZ is one of the largest biological ressource centers worldwide.Its collections currently comprise more than 50,000 items, including about 27,000 different bacterial and 4,000 fungal strains, 800 human and animal cell lines, 700 plant cell lines, 1,400 plant viruses and antisera, and 13,000 different types of bacterial genomic DNA.. All biological materials accepted in the DSMZ collection are subject to extensive quality control and physiological and molecular characterization by our central services. In addition, DSMZ provides an extensive documentation and detailed diagnostic information on the biological materials. The unprecedented diversity and quality management of its bioressources render the DSMZ an internationally reknown supplier for science, diagnostic laboratories, national reference centers, as well as industrial partners.