Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 49 result(s)
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
Country
We are a leading international centre for genomics and bioinformatics research. Our mandate is to advance knowledge about cancer and other diseases, to improve human health through disease prevention, diagnosis and therapeutic approaches, and to realize the social and economic benefits of genomics research.
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
Reactome is a manually curated, peer-reviewed pathway database, annotated by expert biologists and cross-referenced to bioinformatics databases. Its aim is to share information in the visual representations of biological pathways in a computationally accessible format. Pathway annotations are authored by expert biologists, in collaboration with Reactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to many bioinformatics databases. These include NCBI Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the UCSC and HapMap Genome Browsers, the KEGG Compound and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and Gene Ontology.
The European Union Open Data Portal is the single point of access to a growing range of data from the institutions and other bodies of the European Union (EU). Data are free for you to use and reuse for commercial or non-commercial purposes. By providing easy and free access to data, the portal aims to promote their innovative use and unleash their economic potential. It also aims to help foster the transparency and the accountability of the institutions and other bodies of the EU. The EU Open Data Portal is managed by the Publications Office of the European Union. Implementation of the EU's open data policy is the responsibility of the Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology of the European Commission.
WorldData.AI comes with a built-in workspace – the next-generation hyper-computing platform powered by a library of 3.3 billion curated external trends. WorldData.AI allows you to save your models in its “My Models Trained” section. You can make your models public and share them on social media with interesting images, model features, summary statistics, and feature comparisons. Empower others to leverage your models. For example, if you have discovered a previously unknown impact of interest rates on new-housing demand, you may want to share it through “My Models Trained.” Upload your data and combine it with external trends to build, train, and deploy predictive models with one click! WorldData.AI inspects your raw data, applies feature processors, chooses the best set of algorithms, trains and tunes multiple models, and then ranks model performance.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
This Web resource provides data and information relevant to SARS coronavirus. It includes links to the most recent sequence data and publications, to other SARS related resources, and a pre-computed alignment of genome sequences from various isolates. The genome of SARS-CoV consists of a single, positive-strand RNA that is approximately 29,700 nucleotides long. The overall genome organization of SARS-CoV is similar to that of other coronaviruses. The reference genome includes 13 genes, which encode at least 14 proteins. Two large overlapping reading frames (ORFs) encompass 71% of the genome. The remainder has 12 potential ORFs, including genes for structural proteins S (spike), E (small envelope), M (membrane), and N (nucleocapsid). Other potential ORFs code for unique putative SARS-CoV-specific polypeptides that lack obvious sequence similarity to known proteins.
ViPR, the Virus Pathogen Resource, is a publicly available, NIAID-sponsored one-stop database and analysis resource that supports the research of viral pathogens in the NIAID Category A-C Priority Pathogen lists and those causing (re)emerging infectious diseases. ViPR integrates data from external sources (GenBank, UniProt, Immune Epitope Database, Protein Data Bank, etc.), direct submissions, and internal curation and analysis pipelines, and provides a suite of bioinformatics analysis and visualization tools to expedite virology research.
VIPERdb is a database for icosahedral virus capsid structures . The emphasis of the resource is on providing data from structural and computational analyses on these systems, as well as high quality renderings for visual exploration. In addition, all virus capsids are placed in a single icosahedral orientation convention, facilitating comparison between different structures. The web site includes powerful search utilities , links to other relevant databases, background information on virus capsid structure, and useful database interface tools.
The Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX) is an open platform for sharing data across crises and organisations. Launched in July 2014, the goal of HDX is to make humanitarian data easy to find and use for analysis. HDX is managed by OCHA's Centre for Humanitarian Data, which is located in The Hague. OCHA is part of the United Nations Secretariat and is responsible for bringing together humanitarian actors to ensure a coherent response to emergencies. The HDX team includes OCHA staff and a number of consultants who are based in North America, Europe and Africa.
WikiPathways was established to facilitate the contribution and maintenance of pathway information by the biology community. WikiPathways is an open, collaborative platform dedicated to the curation of biological pathways. WikiPathways thus presents a new model for pathway databases that enhances and complements ongoing efforts, such as KEGG, Reactome and Pathway Commons. Building on the same MediaWiki software that powers Wikipedia, we added a custom graphical pathway editing tool and integrated databases covering major gene, protein, and small-molecule systems. The familiar web-based format of WikiPathways greatly reduces the barrier to participate in pathway curation. More importantly, the open, public approach of WikiPathways allows for broader participation by the entire community, ranging from students to senior experts in each field. This approach also shifts the bulk of peer review, editorial curation, and maintenance to the community.
The Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO) assembles clinical, laboratory and epidemiological data on a collaborative platform to be shared with the research and humanitarian communities. The data are analysed to generate reliable evidence and innovative resources that enable research-driven responses to the major challenges of emerging and neglected infections. Access is available to individual patient data held for malaria and Ebola virus disease. Resources for visceral leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminths, Chagas disease and COVID-19 are under development. IDDO contains the following repositories : COVID-19 Data Platform, Chagas Data Platform, Schistosomiasis & Soil Transmitted Helminths Data Platform, Visceral Leishmaniasis Data Platform, Ebola Data Platform, WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN)
Content type(s)
The NTR is a publicly accessible and freely searchable prospective trial register in which studies are registered that run in the Netherlands or are carried out by Dutch researchers. Primary Registries have been recognized and accepted by the WHO and ICMJE. If your study is included in one of these registers, you meet the registration requirements. For the Netherlands the NTR is the Primary Registry.
Country
ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) started as a protein-centric in-memory database for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. The data types and contents grew over time to include RNA-Seq expression data, drug-target interactions and cell line viability data.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
IEDB offers easy searching of experimental data characterizing antibody and T cell epitopes studied in humans, non-human primates, and other animal species. Epitopes involved in infectious disease, allergy, autoimmunity, and transplant are included. The IEDB also hosts tools to assist in the prediction and analysis of B cell and T cell epitopes.
The European Data Portal harvests the metadata of Public Sector Information available on public data portals across European countries. Information regarding the provision of data and the benefits of re-using data is also included.
ClinicalTrials.gov (Clinical trials) is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world.
Content type(s)
CTD is a robust, publicly available database that aims to advance understanding about how environmental exposures affect human health. It provides manually curated information about chemical–gene/protein interactions, chemical–disease and gene–disease relationships. These data are integrated with functional and pathway data to aid in development of hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying environmentally influenced diseases. We also have additional ongoing projects involving manual curation of exposome data and chemical–phenotype relationships to help identify pre–disease biomarkers resulting from environmental exposures. The initial release of CTD was on November 12, 2004. We’re grateful to our strong community support and encourage you to give us feedback so we can continue to evolve with your research needs.
Country
A data repository for the storage and sharing of Adaptive Immune Receptor Repertoire data. Primary public repository for the iReceptor Platform and Scientific Gateway. Further URL for the repository: http://www.ireceptor.org
Content type(s)
While focused on supporting the scientific community, ATCC activities range widely, from repository-related operations to providing specialized services, conducting in-house R&D and intellectual property management. ATCC serves U.S. and international researchers by characterizing cell lines, bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa, as well as developing and evaluating assays and techniques for validating research resources and preserving and distributing biological materials to the public and private sector research communities. Our management philosophy emphasizes customer satisfaction, value addition, cost-effective operations and competitive benchmarking for all areas of our enterprise.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.