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Found 25 result(s)
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.
TPA is a database that contains sequences built from the existing primary sequence data in GenBank. TPA records are retrieved through the Nucleotide Database and feature information on the sequence, how it was cataloged, and proper way to cite the sequence information.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
!!! GSS sequences are now being merged into the NCBI Nucleotide database !!! The GSS database collects unannotated, short, single-read, primary genomic sequences from GenBank and contains nucleic acid sequences. These sequences include random survey sequences, clone-end sequences, and exon-trapped sequences.
>>>!!!<<<Efforts to obtain renewed funding after 2008 were unfortunately not successful. PANDIT has therefore been frozen since November 2008, and its data are not updated since September 2005 when version 17.0 was released (corresponding to Pfam 17.0). The existing data and website remain available from these pages, and should remain stable and, we hope, useful. >>>!!!<<< PANDIT is a collection of multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees. It contains corresponding amino acid and nucleotide sequence alignments, with trees inferred from each alignment. PANDIT is based on the Pfam database (Protein families database of alignments and HMMs), and includes the seed amino acid alignments of most families in the Pfam-A database. DNA sequences for as many members of each family as possible are extracted from the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and aligned according to the amino acid alignment. PANDIT also contains a further copy of the amino acid alignments, restricted to the sequences for which DNA sequences were found.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
The NCBI Trace Archive is a permanent repository of DNA sequence chromatograms (traces), base calls, and quality estimates for single-pass reads from various large-scale sequencing projects. The Trace Archive serves as the repository of sequencing data from gel/capillary platforms such as Applied Biosystems ABI 3730®. The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome Analyzer®, Applied Biosystems SOLiD® System, Helicos Heliscope®, and others. The Trace Assembly Archive stores pairwise alignment and multiple alignment of sequencing reads, linking basic trace data with finished genomic sequence.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
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The Organelle Genome Megasequencing Program (OGMP) provides mitochondrial, chloroplast, and mitochondrial plasmid genome data. OGMP tools allow direct comparison of OGMP and NCBI validated records. Includes GOBASE, a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts.
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China National GeneBank DataBase (CNGBdb) is a unified platform built for biological big data sharing and application services to the research community. Based on the big data and cloud computing technologies, it provides data services such as archive, analysis, knowledge search, management authorization, and visualization. At present, CNGBdb has integrated large amounts of internal and external molecular data and other information from CNGB, NCBI, EBI, DDBJ, etc., indexed by search, covering 12 data structures. Moreover, CNGBdb correlates living sources, biological samples and bioinformatic data to realize the traceability of comprehensive data.
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The Chickpea Transcriptome Database (CTDB) has been developed with the view to provide most comprehensive information about the chickpea transcriptome, the most relevant part of the genome. The database contains various information and tools for transcriptome sequence, functional annotation, conserved domain(s), transcription factor families, molecular markers (microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms), Comprehensive gene expression and comparative genomics with other legumes. The database is a freely available resource, which provides user scientists/breeders a portal to search, browse and query the data to facilitate functional and applied genomics research in chickpea and other legumes. The current release of database provides transcriptome sequence from cultivated (Cicer arietinum desi (ICC4958) and kabuli (ICCV2)) and wild (Cicer reticulatum, PI489777) chickpea genotypes.
The UniPROBE (Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation) database hosts data generated by universal protein binding microarray (PBM) technology on the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins. This initial release of the UniPROBE database provides a centralized resource for accessing comprehensive data on the preferences of proteins for all possible sequence variants ('words') of length k ('k-mers'), as well as position weight matrix (PWM) and graphical sequence logo representations of the k-mer data. In total, the database currently hosts DNA binding data for 406 nonredundant proteins from a diverse collection of organisms, including the prokaryote Vibrio harveyi, the eukaryotic malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the parasitic Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse, and human. The database's web tools (on the right) include a text-based search, a function for assessing motif similarity between user-entered data and database PWMs, and a function for locating putative binding sites along user-entered nucleotide sequences
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) is a catalogue/compendium of inherited disorders, other (single-locus) traits, and genes in 218 animal species (other than human and mouse and rats, which have their own resources) authored by Professor Frank Nicholas of the University of Sydney, Australia, with help from many people over the years. OMIA information is stored in a database that contains textual information and references, as well as links to relevant PubMed and Gene records at the NCBI, and to OMIM and Ensembl.
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A small genotype data repository containing data used in recent papers from the Estonian Biocentre. Most of the data pertains to human population genetics. PDF files of the papers are also freely available.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
GOBASE is a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts. GOBASE is currently expanding to include information on representative bacteria that are thought to be specifically related to the bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
PHI-base is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from fungal, Oomycete and bacterial pathogens, which infect animal, plant, fungal and insect hosts. PHI-base is therfore an invaluable resource in the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. In collaboration with the FRAC team, PHI-base also includes antifungal compounds and their target genes.
The Conserved Domain Database is a resource for the annotation of functional units in proteins. Its collection of domain models includes a set curated by NCBI, which utilizes 3D structure to provide insights into sequence/structure/function relationships
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
BioModels is a repository of mathematical models of biological and biomedical systems. It hosts a vast selection of existing literature-based physiologically and pharmaceutically relevant mechanistic models in standard formats. Our mission is to provide the systems modelling community with reproducible, high-quality, freely-accessible models published in the scientific literature.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
This Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database (Animal QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and trait mapping data (i.e. trait and genome location association data; collectively called "QTL data" on this site) on livestock animal species for easily locating and making comparisons within and between species. New database tools are continuely added to align the QTL and association data to other types of genome information, such as annotated genes, RH / SNP markers, and human genome maps. Besides the QTL data from species listed below, the QTLdb is open to house QTL/association date from other animal species where feasible. Note that the JAS along with other journals, now require that new QTL/association data be entered into a QTL database as part of their publication requirements.