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Found 146 result(s)
Språkbanken is a collection of Norwegian language technology resources, and a national infrastructure for language technology and research. Our mandate is to collect and develop language resources, and to make these available for researchers, students and the ICT industry which works with the development of language-based ICT solutions. Språkbanken was established as a language policy initiative, designed to ensure that language technology solutions based on the Norwegian language will be developed, and thereby prevent domain loss of Norwegian in technology-dependent areas, cf. Mål og meining (Report 35, 2007 – 2008). As of today the collection contains resources in both Norwegian Bokmål and Nynorsk, as well as in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian Sign Language (NTS).
An increasing number of Language Resources (LT) in the various fields of Human Language Technology (HLT) are distributed on behalf of ELRA via its operational body ELDA, thanks to the contribution of various players of the HLT community. Our aim is to provide Language Resources, by means of this repository, so as to prevent researchers and developers from investing efforts to rebuild resources which already exist as well as help them identify and access those resources.
The Language Archive Cologne (LAC) is a research data repository for the linguistics and all humanities disciplines working with audiovisual data. The archive forms a cluster of the Data Center for Humanities in cooperation with the Institute of Linguistics of the University of Cologne. The LAC is an archive for language resources, which is freely available via a web-based access. In addition, concrete technical and methodological advice is offered in the research data cycle - from the collection of the data, their preparation and archiving, to publication and reuse.
The focus of CLARIN INT Portal is on resources that are relevant to the lexicological study of the Dutch language and on resources relevant for research in and development of language and speech technology. For Example: lexicons, lexical databases, text corpora, speech corpora, language and speech technology tools, etc. The resources are: Cornetto-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Corpus of Contemporary Dutch (Corpus Hedendaags Nederlands), Corpus Gysseling, Corpus VU-DNC (VU University Diachronic News text Corpus), Dictionary of the Frisian Language (Woordenboek der Friese Taal), DuELME-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Language Portal (Taalportaal), Namescape, NERD (Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation) and TICCLops (Text-Induced Corpus Clean-up online processing system).
The goal of the Center of Estonian Language Resources (CELR) is to create and manage an infrastructure to make the Estonian language digital resources (dictionaries, corpora – both text and speech –, various language databases) and language technology tools (software) available to everyone working with digital language materials. CELR coordinates and organises the documentation and archiving of the resources as well as develops language technology standards and draws up necessary legal contracts and licences for different types of users (public, academic, commercial, etc.). In addition to collecting language resources, a system will be launched for introducing the resources to, informing and educating the potential users. The main users of CELR are researchers from Estonian R&D institutions and Social Sciences and Humanities researchers all over the world via the CLARIN ERIC network of similar centers in Europe. Access to data is provided through different sites: Public Repository https://entu.keeleressursid.ee/public-document, Language resources https://keeleressursid.ee/en/resources/corpora, and MetaShare CELR https://metashare.ut.ee/.
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
CLARIN-UK is a consortium of centres of expertise involved in research and resource creation involving digital language data and tools. The consortium includes the national library, and academic departments and university centres in linguistics, languages, literature and computer science.
The knowledge centre is an information service offering advice on the use of digital language resources and tools for Swedish and other languages in Sweden, as well as other parts of the intangible cultural heritage of Sweden.
The South African Centre for Digital Language Resources (SADiLaR) is a national centre supported by the Department of Science and Technology (DST). SADiLaR has an enabling function, with a focus on all official languages of South Africa, supporting research and development in the domains of language technologies and language-related studies in the humanities and social sciences.
The domain of the IDS repository is the German language, mainly in its current form (contemporary New High German). Its designated community are national and international researchers in German and general linguistics. As an institutional repository, the repository provides long term archival of two important IDS projects: the Deutsches Referenzkorpus (‘German Reference Corpus’, DeReKo), which curates a large corpus of written German language, and the Archiv für Gesprochenes Deutsch (‘Archive of Spoken German’, AGD), which curates several corpora of spoken German. In addition, the repository enables germanistic researchers from IDS and from other research facilities and universities to deposit their research data for long term archival of data and metadata arising from research projects.
In collaboration with other centres in the Text+ consortium and in the CLARIN infrastructure, the CLARIND-UdS enables eHumanities by providing a service for hosting and processing language resources (notably corpora) for members of the research community. CLARIND-UdS centre thus contributes of lifting the fragmentation of language resources by assisting members of the research community in preparing language materials in such a way that easy discovery is ensured, interchange is facilitated and preservation is enabled by enriching such materials with meta-information, transforming them into sustainable formats and hosting them. We have an explicit mission to archive language resources especially multilingual corpora (parallel, comparable) and corpora including specific registers, both collected by associated researchers as well as researchers who are not affiliated with us.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The Alaska Native Language Archive houses documentation of the various Native languages of Alaska and helps to preserve and cultivate this unique heritage for future generations. As the premier repository worldwide for information relating to the Native languages of Alaska, the Archive serves researchers, teachers and students, as well as members of the broader community. The collection includes both published and unpublished materials in or on all of the Alaska Native languages and related languages. The collection has enduring cultural, historic, and intellectual value, particularly for Alaska Native language speakers and their descendants
CLARIN-LV is a national node of Clarin ERIC (Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure). The mission of the repository is to ensure the availability and long­ term preservation of language resources. The data stored in the repository are being actively used and cited in scientific publications.
OLAC, the Open Language Archives Community, is an international partnership of institutions and individuals who are creating a worldwide virtual library of language resources by: (i) developing consensus on best current practice for the digital archiving of language resources, and (ii) developing a network of interoperating repositories and services for housing and accessing such resources. The OLAC system has 2016 been integrated with the Linguistic Linked Open Data Cloud.
The University of Oxford Text Archive develops, collects, catalogues and preserves electronic literary and linguistic resources for use in Higher Education, in research, teaching and learning. We also give advice on the creation and use of these resources, and are involved in the development of standards and infrastructure for electronic language resources.
The aim of the project is systematic mapping of Czech and other languages in comparison with Czech. CNC corpora are accessible to everybody interested in studying the language after free registration.
SWE-CLARIN is a national node in European Language and Technology Infrastructure (CLARIN) - an ESFRI initiative to build an infrastructure for e-science in the humanities and social sciences. SWE-CLARIN makes language-based materials available as research data using advanced processing tools and other resources. One basic idea is that the increasing amount of text and speech - contemporary and historical - as digital research material enables new forms of e-science and new ways to tackle old research issues.
The Language Archive at the Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen provides a unique record of how people around the world use language in everyday life. It focuses on collecting spoken and signed language materials in audio and video form along with transcriptions, analyses, annotations and other types of relevant material (e.g. photos, accompanying notes).
This website constitutes a repository of tools and resources for researchers and teachers that are interested in second language speech acquisition and pronunciation teaching in diverse educational contexts. If you are a RESEARCHER in the field of second language acquisition (SLA), here you will find a wide range of validated tools that may be useful for your individual differences, SLA or L2 speech studies. If you are a passionate second language pronunciation TEACHER interested in communicative methods, here you will be able to download several carefully designed explicit instruction, communicative form-focused activities and pronunciation-based tasks that are ready to be used in your classroom
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
ORTOLANG is an EQUIPEX project accepted in February 2012 in the framework of investissements d’avenir. Its aim is to construct a network infrastructure including a repository of language data (corpora, lexicons, dictionaries etc.) and readily available, well-documented tools for its processing. Expected outcomes comprize: promoting research on analysis, modelling and automatic processing of our language to their highest international levels thanks to effective resource pooling; facilitating the use and transfer of resources and tools set up within public laboratories to industrial partners, notably SMEs which often cannot develop such resources and tools for language processing given the cost of investment; promoting French language and the regional languages of France by sharing expertise acquired by public laboratories. ORTOLANG is a service for the language, which is complementary to the service offered by Huma-Num (très grande infrastructure de recherche). Ortolang gives access to SLDR for speech, and CNRTL for text resources.
LINDAT/CLARIN is designed as a Czech “node” of Clarin ERIC (Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure). It also supports the goals of the META-NET language technology network. Both networks aim at collection, annotation, development and free sharing of language data and basic technologies between institutions and individuals both in science and in all types of research. The Clarin ERIC infrastructural project is more focused on humanities, while META-NET aims at the development of language technologies and applications. The data stored in the repository are already being used in scientific publications in the Czech Republic. In 2019 LINDAT/CLARIAH-CZ was established as a unification of two research infrastructures, LINDAT/CLARIN and DARIAH-CZ.
The Language Bank features text and speech corpora with different kinds of annotations in over 60 languages. There is also a selection of tools for working with them, from linguistic analyzers to programming environments. Corpora are also available via web interfaces, and users can be allowed to download some of them. The IP holders can monitor the use of their resources and view user statistics.
Iceland joined CLARIN ERIC on February 1st, 2020, after having been an observer since November 2018. The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture assigned The Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies the role of leading partner in the Icelandic National Consortium and appointed Professor Emeritus Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson as National Coordinator, later replaced by Starkaður Barkarson, a project manager at The Árni Magnússon Institute. Most of the relevant institutions participate in the CLARIN-IS National Consortium. The Árni Magnússon Institute has already established a Metadata Providing Centre (CLARIN C-Centre) which hosts metadata for Icelandic language resources and makes them available through the Virtual Language Observatory. The aim is to establish a Service Providing Centre (CLARIN B-Centre) which will provide both service and access to resources and knowledge.