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Found 82 result(s)
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
This resource allows users to search for and compare influenza virus genomes and gene sequences taken from GenBank. It also provides a virus sequence annotation tool and links to other influenza resources: NIAID project, JCVI Flu, Influenza research database, CDC Flu, Vaccine Selection and WHO Flu.
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
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BacMap is a picture atlas of annotated bacterial genomes. It is an interactive visual database containing hundreds of fully labeled, zoomable, and searchable maps of bacterial genomes.
ASAP (a systematic annotation package for community analysis of genomes) is a relational database and web interface developed to store, update and distribute genome sequence data and gene expression data collected by or in collaboration with researchers at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. ASAP was designed to facilitate ongoing community annotation of genomes and to grow with genome projects as they move from the preliminary data stage through post-sequencing functional analysis. The ASAP database includes multiple genome sequences at various stages of analysis, and gene expression data from preliminary experiments.
Gramene is a platform for comparative genomic analysis of agriculturally important grasses, including maize, rice, sorghum, wheat and barley. Relationships between cereals are queried and displayed using controlled vocabularies (Gene, Plant, Trait, Environment, and Gramene Taxonomy) and web-based displays, including the Genes and Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) modules.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
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CAZy is a specialist database dedicated to the display and analysis of genomic, structural and biochemical information on Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes). CAZy data are accessible either by browsing sequence-based families or by browsing the content of genomes in carbohydrate-active enzymes. New genomes are added regularly shortly after they appear in the daily releases of GenBank. New families are created based on published evidence for the activity of at least one member of the family and all families are regularly updated, both in content and in description.
The HomoloGene database provides a system for the automated detection of homologs among annotated genes of genomes across multiple species. These homologs are fully documented and organized by homology group. HomoloGene processing uses proteins from input organisms to compare and sequence homologs, mapping back to corresponding DNA sequences.
OrthoMCL is a genome-scale algorithm for grouping orthologous protein sequences. It provides not only groups shared by two or more species/genomes, but also groups representing species-specific gene expansion families. So it serves as an important utility for automated eukaryotic genome annotation. OrthoMCL starts with reciprocal best hits within each genome as potential in-paralog/recent paralog pairs and reciprocal best hits across any two genomes as potential ortholog pairs. Related proteins are interlinked in a similarity graph. Then MCL (Markov Clustering algorithm,Van Dongen 2000; www.micans.org/mcl) is invoked to split mega-clusters. This process is analogous to the manual review in COG construction. MCL clustering is based on weights between each pair of proteins, so to correct for differences in evolutionary distance the weights are normalized before running MCL.
PhytoPath is a new bioinformatics resource that integrates genome-scale data from important plant pathogen species with literature-curated information about the phenotypes of host infection. Using the Ensembl Genomes browser, it provides access to complete genome assembly and gene models of priority crop and model-fungal, oomycete and bacterial phytopathogens. PhytoPath also links genes to disease progression using data from the curated PHI-base resource. PhytoPath portal is a joint project bringing together Ensembl Genomes with PHI-base, a community-curated resource describing the role of genes in pathogenic infection. PhytoPath provides access to genomic and phentoypic data from fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, and has enabled a considerable increase in the coverage of phytopathogen genomes in Ensembl Fungi and Ensembl Protists. PhytoPath also provides enhanced searching of the PHI-base resource as well as the fungi and protists in Ensembl Genomes.
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
AmoebaDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for Entamoeba and Acanthamoeba parasites. In its first iteration (released in early 2010), AmoebaDB contains the genomes of three Entamoeba species (see below). AmoebaDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and will rapidly expand to include experimental data and environmental isolate sequences provided by community researchers . The database includes supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
The BioCyc database collection of Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs) provides a reference on the genomes and metabolic pathways of thousands of sequenced organisms. BioCyc PGDBs are generated by software that predict the metabolic pathways of completely sequenced organisms, predict which genes code for missing enzymes in metabolic pathways, and predict operons. BioCyc also integrates information from other bioinformatics databases, such as protein feature and Gene Ontology information from UniProt. The BioCyc website provides a suite of software tools for database searching and visualization, for omics data analysis, and for comparative genomics and comparative pathway questions. From 2016 on, access to the EcoCyc and MetaCyc databases will remain free. Subscriptions to the other 7,600 BioCyc databases will be available to institutions (e.g., libraries), and to individuals. Access to licensed databases via: http://www.phoenixbioinformatics.org/biocyc .
NCBI Virus Variation is a specialized database which collects tools to provide searchable resources in the fields of Influenza virus, Dengue virus, and West Nile virus. Specific BLAST databases are listed. Their new publications are also available in their site. Rotavirus database will be added in their site soon.
InterPro collects information about protein sequence analysis and classification, providing access to a database of predictive protein signatures used for the classification and automatic annotation of proteins and genomes. Sequences in InterPro are classified at superfamily, family, and subfamily. InterPro predicts the occurrence of functional domains, repeats, and important sites, and adds in-depth annotation such as GO terms to the protein signatures.
MozAtlas provides gene expression data of adult male and female mosquitoes as tables, expressions, trees and models. MozAtlas also provides sequence orthology relationships with data provided by FlyBase, Vectorbase, Beetlebase, BeeBase, and WormBase.
This Web resource provides data and information relevant to SARS coronavirus. It includes links to the most recent sequence data and publications, to other SARS related resources, and a pre-computed alignment of genome sequences from various isolates. The genome of SARS-CoV consists of a single, positive-strand RNA that is approximately 29,700 nucleotides long. The overall genome organization of SARS-CoV is similar to that of other coronaviruses. The reference genome includes 13 genes, which encode at least 14 proteins. Two large overlapping reading frames (ORFs) encompass 71% of the genome. The remainder has 12 potential ORFs, including genes for structural proteins S (spike), E (small envelope), M (membrane), and N (nucleocapsid). Other potential ORFs code for unique putative SARS-CoV-specific polypeptides that lack obvious sequence similarity to known proteins.
This database serves forest tree scientists by providing online access to hardwood tree genomic and genetic data, including assembled reference genomes, transcriptomes, and genetic mapping information. The web site also provides access to tools for mining and visualization of these data sets, including BLAST for comparing sequences, Jbrowse for browsing genomes, Apollo for community annotation and Expression Analysis to build gene expression heatmaps.
OrtholugeDB contains Ortholuge-based orthology predictions for completely sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes. It is also a resource for reciprocal best BLAST-based ortholog predictions, in-paralog predictions (recently duplicated genes) and ortholog groups in Bacteria and Archaea. The Ortholuge method improves the specificity of high-throughput orthology prediction.
Phytozome is the Plant Comparative Genomics portal of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute. Families of related genes representing the modern descendants of ancestral genes are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These families allow easy access to clade-specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as insights into clade-specific novelties and expansions.
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Mapping, copy number analysis, sequence and gene expression data generated by the High Resolution Analysis of Follicular Lymphoma Genomes project. The data will be available for 24 patients with follicular lymphoma. All data will be made as widely and freely available as possible while safeguarding the privacy of participants, and protecting confidential and proprietary data.The data from this project will be submitted to public genomic data sources. These sources will be listed on this web site as the data becomes available in these external data sources.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.