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Found 51 result(s)
We are developing an open, online platform to provide a seamless access to cloud computing infrastructure and brain data and data derivatives. This platform is meant to reach out beyond neuroscience, allowing also computer scientists, statisticians and engineers interested in brain data to use the data to develop and publish their methods. Brain Life is a project under active development. We currently offer several cloud computing services – also called Brain Life Applications. Sixty-six collaborators from global scientific communities contribute to the project by providing data, applications, technology and products to advance understanding the human brain.
BrainMaps.org, launched in May 2005, is an interactive multiresolution next-generation brain atlas that is based on over 20 million megapixels of sub-micron resolution, annotated, scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and that is integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function over the internet. Currently featured are complete brain atlas datasets for various species, including Macaca mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops, Felis catus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, and Tyto alba.
The Brain Biodiversity Bank refers to the repository of images of and information about brain specimens contained in the collections associated with the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. These collections include, besides the Michigan State University Collection, the Welker Collection from the University of Wisconsin, the Yakovlev-Haleem Collection from Harvard University, the Meyer Collection from the Johns Hopkins University, and the Huber-Crosby and Crosby-Lauer Collections from the University of Michigan and the C.U. Ariëns Kappers brain collection from Amsterdam Netherlands.Introducing online atlases of the brains of humans, sheep, dolphins, and other animals. A world resource for illustrations of whole brains and stained sections from a great variety of mammals
The Allen Brain Atlas provides a unique online public resource integrating extensive gene expression data, connectivity data and neuroanatomical information with powerful search and viewing tools for the adult and developing brain in mouse, human and non-human primate
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The version 1.0 of the open database contains 1,151,268 brain signals of 2 seconds each, captured with the stimulus of seeing a digit (from 0 to 9) and thinking about it, over the course of almost 2 years between 2014 & 2015, from a single Test Subject David Vivancos. All the signals have been captured using commercial EEGs (not medical grade), NeuroSky MindWave, Emotiv EPOC, Interaxon Muse & Emotiv Insight, covering a total of 19 Brain (10/20) locations.
Virtual Fly Brain (VFB) - an interactive tool for neurobiologists to explore the detailed neuroanatomy, neuron connectivity and gene expression of the adult Drosophila melanogaster brain.
FlyCircuit is a public database for online archiving, cell type inventory, browsing, searching, analysis and 3D visualization of individual neurons in the Drosophila brain. The FlyCircuit Database currently contains about 30,000 high resolution 3D brain neural images of the drosophila fruit fly brain that are combined into a neural circuitry network that researchers can use as a blueprint to further explore how the brain of a fruit fly processes external sensory signals (i.e. how vision, hearing, and smell are transmitted to the central nerve system).
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This is an information resource for central nervous system imaging which integrates clinical information with magnetic resonance (MR), x-ray computed tomography (CT), and nuclear medicine images.
The Brain Transcriptome Database (BrainTx) project aims to create an integrated platform to visualize and analyze our original transcriptome data and publicly accessible transcriptome data related to the genetics that underlie the development, function, and dysfunction stages and states of the brain.
The Comparative Mammalian Brain Collection web site provides site visitors with images and information from several of the world's largest collections of well-preserved, sectioned and stained brains of mammals, principally those at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Michigan State University. These collections are currently being consolidated into a central repository at the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. The collections have been a century in the making and represent the efforts of dozens of skilled scientists. Their colocation at a single facility will represent a national and international center for comparative brain study of the actual specimens. The centralized web site offers many kinds of access to the information contained in the specimens, for use by students and researchers worldwide.
The Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) informatics system was developed to share data across the entire TBI research field and to facilitate collaboration between laboratories, as well as interconnectivity with other informatics platforms. Sharing data, methodologies, and associated tools, rather than summaries or interpretations of this information, can accelerate research progress by allowing re-analysis of data, as well as re-aggregation, integration, and rigorous comparison with other data, tools, and methods. This community-wide sharing requires common data definitions and standards, as well as comprehensive and coherent informatics approaches.
This site provides information about the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development (Pediatric MRI Study) and resulting Pediatric MRI Data Repository. This website serves as the portal through which data can be obtained by qualified researchers. The overarching goal of the Pediatric MRI Study is to foster a better understanding of normal brain maturation as a basis for understanding atypical brain development associated with a variety of disorders and diseases.
<<!! checked 20.03.2017 SumsDB was offline; for more information see https://www.researchgate.net/project/salvaging-data-from-sumsdb!! >> SumsDB (the Surface Management System DataBase) is a repository of brain-mapping data (surfaces & volumes; structural & functional data) from many laboratories.
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The Parkinson disease Mutation Database (PDmutDB) aims at collecting all known mutations in the genes related to Parkinson disease (PD). Mutations are collected from the literature and from presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, mutations can be submitted to PDmutDB at this web site.
The goal of the NeuroElectro Project is to extract information about the electrophysiological properties (e.g. resting membrane potentials and membrane time constants) of diverse neuron types from the existing literature and place it into a centralized database.
The Connectome Coordination Facility (CCF) houses and distributes public research data for a series of studies that focus on the connections within the human brain. These are known as Human Connectome Projects. he Connectome Coordination Facility (CCF) was chartered to help coordinate myriad research projects, harmonize their data, and facilitate the dissemination of results.
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The New York Brain Bank (NYBB) at Columbia University was established to collect postmortem human brains to meet the needs of neuroscientists investigating specific psychiatric and neurological disorders.
The repository of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour at the Radboud University is used to manage, share and publish neuroscience and neuroimaging data, including MRI, EEG, MEG and other types of research data.
This project is an open invitation to anyone and everyone to participate in a decentralized effort to explore the opportunities of open science in neuroimaging. We aim to document how much (scientific) value can be generated from a data release — from the publication of scientific findings derived from this dataset, algorithms and methods evaluated on this dataset, and/or extensions of this dataset by acquisition and incorporation of new data. The project involves the processing of acoustic stimuli. In this study, the scientists have demonstrated an audiodescription of classic "Forrest Gump" to subjects, while researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have captured the brain activity of test candidates in the processing of language, music, emotions, memories and pictorial representations.In collaboration with various labs in Magdeburg we acquired and published what is probably the most comprehensive sample of brain activation patterns of natural language processing. Volunteers listened to a two-hour audio movie version of the Hollywood feature film "Forrest Gump" in a 7T MRI scanner. High-resolution brain activation patterns and physiological measurements were recorded continuously. These data have been placed into the public domain, and are freely available to the scientific community and the general public.
This website makes data available from the first round of data sharing projects that were supported by the CRCNS funding program. To enable concerted efforts in understanding the brain experimental data and other resources such as stimuli and analysis tools should be widely shared by researchers all over the world. To serve this purpose, this website provides a marketplace and discussion forum for sharing tools and data in neuroscience. To date we host experimental data sets of high quality that will be valuable for testing computational models of the brain and new analysis methods. The data include physiological recordings from sensory and memory systems, as well as eye movement data.
NeuroMorpho.Org is a centrally curated inventory of digitally reconstructed neurons associated with peer-reviewed publications. It contains contributions from over 80 laboratories worldwide and is continuously updated as new morphological reconstructions are collected, published, and shared. To date, NeuroMorpho.Org is the largest collection of publicly accessible 3D neuronal reconstructions and associated metadata which can be used for detailed single cell simulations.
Alzforum is an independent research project to develop an online community resource to manage scientific knowledge, information, and data about Alzheimer disease (AD).
The Mindboggle-101 data consist of three data sets: (1) individually labeled human brain surfaces and volumes, (2) templates (unlabeled images combining the individual brains, used for registration), and (3) atlases (anatomical labels combining the individual brains, used for labeling).
Brainlife promotes engagement and education in reproducible neuroscience. We do this by providing an online platform where users can publish code (Apps), Data, and make it "alive" by integragrate various HPC and cloud computing resources to run those Apps. Brainlife also provide mechanisms to publish all research assets associated with a scientific project (data and analyses) embedded in a cloud computing environment and referenced by a single digital-object-identifier (DOI). The platform is unique because of its focus on supporting scientific reproducibility beyond open code and open data, by providing fundamental smart mechanisms for what we refer to as “Open Services.”