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Found 190 result(s)
>>>!!! <<< The Epigenomics database was retired on June 1, 2016. All epigenomics data are available in our GEO resource https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo >>> !!! <<< The Epigenomics database provides genomics maps of stable and reprogrammable nuclear changes that control gene expression and influence health. Users can browse current epigenomic experiments as well as search, compare and browse samples from multiple biological sources in gene-specific contexts. Many epigenomes contain modifications with histone marks, DNA methylation and chromatin structure activity. NCBI Epigenomics database contains datasets from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Project.
The NIH 3D Print Exchange (the “Exchange”) is an open, comprehensive, and interactive website for searching, browsing, downloading, and sharing biomedical 3D print files, modeling tutorials, and educational material. "Biomedical" includes models of cells, bacteria, or viruses, molecules like proteins or DNA, and anatomical models of organs, tissue, and body parts. The NIH 3D Print Exchange provides models in formats that are readily compatible with 3D printers, and offers a unique set of tools to create and share 3D-printable models related to biomedical science.
SimTK is a free project-hosting platform for the biomedical computation community that enables researchers to easily share their software, data, and models and provides the infrastructure so they can support and grow a community around their projects. It has over 62,000 members, hosts more than 960 projects from researchers around the world, and has had more than 500,000 files downloaded from it. Individuals have created SimTK projects to meet publisher and funding agencies’ software and data sharing requirements, run scientific challenges, create a collection of their community’s resources, and much more.
The HomoloGene database provides a system for the automated detection of homologs among annotated genes of genomes across multiple species. These homologs are fully documented and organized by homology group. HomoloGene processing uses proteins from input organisms to compare and sequence homologs, mapping back to corresponding DNA sequences.
Neuroimaging Tools and Resources Collaboratory (NITRC) is currently a free one-stop-shop environment for science researchers that need resources such as neuroimaging analysis software, publicly available data sets, and computing power. Since its debut in 2007, NITRC has helped the neuroscience community to use software and data produced from research that, before NITRC, was routinely lost or disregarded, to make further discoveries. NITRC provides free access to data and enables pay-per-use cloud-based access to unlimited computing power, enabling worldwide scientific collaboration with minimal startup and cost. With NITRC and its components—the Resources Registry (NITRC-R), Image Repository (NITRC-IR), and Computational Environment (NITRC-CE)—a researcher can obtain pilot or proof-of-concept data to validate a hypothesis for a few dollars.
The GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) is a consortium of laboratories working to provide the scientific and medical community with tools to facilitate research. The key components are: (1) a molecular atlas of gene expression for the developing organs of the GenitoUrinary (GU) tract; (2) a high resolution molecular anatomy that highlights development of the GU system; (3) mouse strains to facilitate developmental and functional studies within the GU system; (4) tutorials describing GU organogenesis; and (5) rapid access to primary data via the GUDMAP database.
Content type(s)
The Visible Human Project® is an outgrowth of the NLM's 1986 Long-Range Plan. It is the creation of complete, anatomically detailed, three-dimensional representations of the normal male and female human bodies. Acquisition of transverse CT, MR and cryosection images of representative male and female cadavers has been completed. The male was sectioned at one millimeter intervals, the female at one-third of a millimeter intervals.
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic index of data, materials, and tools. Please note, we do not accept direct data deposits, but if you wish to make your data repository or database available through our search, please contact us. An initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NIF advances neuroscience research by enabling discovery and access to public research data and tools worldwide through an open source, networked environment.
TPA is a database that contains sequences built from the existing primary sequence data in GenBank. TPA records are retrieved through the Nucleotide Database and feature information on the sequence, how it was cataloged, and proper way to cite the sequence information.
MassIVE is a community resource developed by the NIH-funded Center for Computational Mass Spectrometry to promote the global, free exchange of mass spectrometry data. MassIVE datasets can be assigned ProteomeXchange accessions to satisfy publication requirements.
4DGenome is a public database that archives and disseminates chromatin interaction data. Currently, 4DGenome contains over 8,038,248 interactions curated from both experimental studies (high throughput and individual studies) and computational predictions. It covers five organisms, Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Plasmodium falciparum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
The ABCD Data Repository houses all data generated by the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. The ABCD Study is supported by NIH partners (the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Cancer Institute, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health), as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Division of Adolescent and School Health. This repository will store data generated by ABCD investigators, serve as a collaborative platform for harmonizing these data, and share those data with qualified researchers.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is an NIH-funded research data repository that aims to accelerate progress in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) research through data sharing, data harmonization, and the reporting of research results. NDAR also serves as a scientific community platform and portal to multiple other research repositories, allowing for aggregation and secondary analysis of data. NDAR combines the function of a data repository, which holds genetic, phenotypic, clinical, and medical imaging data, and the function of a scientific community platform, which defines the standard tools and policies to integrate the computational resources developed by scientific research institutions, private foundations, and other federal and state agencies supporting ASD research. Furthermore, NDAR is working to develop the means to connect relevant repositories together through data federation.
With the creation of the Metabolomics Data Repository managed by Data Repository and Coordination Center (DRCC), the NIH acknowledges the importance of data sharing for metabolomics. Metabolomics represents the systematic study of low molecular weight molecules found in a biological sample, providing a "snapshot" of the current and actual state of the cell or organism at a specific point in time. Thus, the metabolome represents the functional activity of biological systems. As with other ‘omics’, metabolites are conserved across animals, plants and microbial species, facilitating the extrapolation of research findings in laboratory animals to humans. Common technologies for measuring the metabolome include mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which can measure hundreds to thousands of unique chemical entities. Data sharing in metabolomics will include primary raw data and the biological and analytical meta-data necessary to interpret these data. Through cooperation between investigators, metabolomics laboratories and data coordinating centers, these data sets should provide a rich resource for the research community to enhance preclinical, clinical and translational research.
Synapse is an open source software platform that clinical and biological data scientists can use to carry out, track, and communicate their research in real time. Synapse enables co-location of scientific content (data, code, results) and narrative descriptions of that work.
The MMRRC is the nation’s premier national public repository system for mutant mice. Funded by the NIH continuously since 1999, the MMRRC archives and distributes scientifically valuable spontaneous and induced mutant mouse strains and ES cell lines for use by the biomedical research community. The MMRRC consists of a national network of breeding and distribution repositories and an Informatics Coordination and Service Center located at 4 major academic centers across the nation. The MMRRC is committed to upholding the highest standards of experimental design and quality control to optimize the reproducibility of research studies using mutant mice.
>>>!!! NCBI has retired the Probe Database !!!<<< Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
>>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub mission is now completed. The Cancer Genomics Hub was established in August 2011 to provide a repository to The Cancer Genome Atlas, the childhood cancer initiative Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments and the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative. CGHub rapidly grew to be the largest database of cancer genomes in the world, storing more than 2.5 petabytes of data and serving downloads of nearly 3 petabytes per month. As the central repository for the foundational genome files, CGHub streamlined team science efforts as data became as easy to obtain as downloading from a hard drive. The convenient access to Big Data, and the collaborations that CGHub made possible, are now essential to cancer research. That work continues at the NCI's Genomic Data Commons. All files previously stored at CGHub can be found there. The Website for the Genomic Data Commons is here: https://gdc.nci.nih.gov/ >>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub (CGHub) is a secure repository for storing, cataloging, and accessing cancer genome sequences, alignments, and mutation information from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium and related projects. Access to CGHub Data: All researchers using CGHub must meet the access and use criteria established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to ensure the privacy, security, and integrity of participant data. CGHub also hosts some publicly available data, in particular data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. All metadata is publicly available and the catalog of metadata and associated BAMs can be explored using the CGHub Data Browser.
>>> !!! the repository is offline !!! <<< More information see: https://dknet.org/about/NURSA_Archive All NURSA-biocurated transcriptomic datasets have been preserved for data mining in SPP through an enhanced and expanded version of Transcriptomine named Ominer. To access these datasets, dkNET provides users with the information of 527 transcriptomic datasets that contain data related to nuclear receptors and nuclear receptor coregulators in the NURSA Datasets table view and redirects users to the current SPP dataset page. Once users find the specific dataset of research interest, users can download the dataset by clicking DOI and then clicking the Download Dataset button at the Signaling Pathways Project webpage. See https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100013650
Content type(s)
REGARDS is an observational study of risk factors for stroke in adults 45 years or older. 30,239 participants were recruited between January 2003 and October 2007. They completed a telephone interview followed by an in-home physical exam. Measurements included traditional risk factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and an echocardiogram of the heart. At six month intervals, participants are contacted by phone to ask about stroke symptoms, hospitalizations and general health status. The study is ongoing and will follow participants for many years.