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Found 17 result(s)
The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) is the Department of Energy's (DOE) electronic database comprised of health studies of DOE contract workers and environmental studies of areas surrounding DOE facilities. DOE recognizes the benefits of data sharing and supports the public's right to know about worker and community health risks. CEDR provides independent researchers and the public with access to de-identified data collected since the Department's early production years. Current CEDR holdings include more than 80 studies of over 1 million workers at 31 DOE sites. Access to these data is at no cost to the user. Most of CEDR's holdings are derived from epidemiologic studies of DOE workers at many large nuclear weapons plants, such as Hanford, Los Alamos, the Oak Ridge reservation, Savannah River Site, and Rocky Flats. These studies primarily use death certificate information to identify excess deaths and patterns of disease among workers to determine what factors contribute to the risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. In addition, many of these studies have radiation exposure measurements on individual workers. CEDR is supported by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Now a mature system in routine operational use, CEDR's modern internet-based systems respond to thousands of requests to its web server daily. With about 1,500 Internet sites pointing to CEDR's web site, CEDR is a national user facility, with a large audience for data that are not available elsewhere.
MTD is focused on mammalian transcriptomes with a current version that contains data from humans, mice, rats and pigs. Regarding the core features, the MTD browses genes based on their neighboring genomic coordinates or joint KEGG pathway and provides expression information on exons, transcripts, and genes by integrating them into a genome browser. We developed a novel nomenclature for each transcript that considers its genomic position and transcriptional features.
The Life Science Database Archive maintains and stores the datasets generated by life scientists in Japan in a long-term and stable state as national public goods. The Archive makes it easier for many people to search datasets by metadata (description of datasets) in a unified format, and to access and download the datasets with clear terms of use. In addition, the Archive provides datasets in forms friendly to different types of users in public and private institutions, and thereby supports further contribution of each research to life science.
The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt) is a curated database that provides information about proteins that lack fixed 3D structure in their putatively native states, either in their entirety or in part. DisProt is a community resource annotating protein sequences for intrinsically disorder regions from the literature. It classifies intrinsic disorder based on experimental methods and three ontologies for molecular function, transition and binding partner.
The Australian National Corpus collates and provides access to assorted examples of Australian English text, transcriptions, audio and audio-visual materials. Text analysis tools are embedded in the interface allowing analysis and downloads in *.CSV format.
The arctic data archive system (ADS) collects observation data and modeling products obtained by various Japanese research projects and gives researchers to access the results. By centrally managing a wide variety of Arctic observation data, we promote the use of data across multiple disciplines. Researchers use these integrated databases to clarify the mechanisms of environmental change in the atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and cryosphere. That ADS will be provide an opportunity of collaboration between modelers and field scientists, can be expected.
The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data.
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of Web-based neuroscience resources: data, materials, and tools accessible via any computer connected to the Internet. An initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NIF advances neuroscience research by enabling discovery and access to public research data and tools worldwide through an open source, networked environment.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
The NCBI Short Genetic Variations database, commonly known as dbSNP, catalogs short variations in nucleotide sequences from a wide range of organisms. These variations include single nucleotide variations, short nucleotide insertions and deletions, short tandem repeats and microsatellites. Short Genetic Variations may be common, thus representing true polymorphisms, or they may be rare. Some rare human entries have additional information associated withthem, including disease associations, genotype information and allele origin, as some variations are somatic rather than germline events. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017***
PHI-base is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from fungal, Oomycete and bacterial pathogens, which infect animal, plant, fungal and insect hosts. PHI-base is therfore an invaluable resource in the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. In collaboration with the FRAC team, PHI-base also includes antifungal compounds and their target genes.
The Sequence Read Archive stores the raw sequencing data from such sequencing platforms as the Roche 454 GS System, the Illumina Genome Analyzer, the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System, the Helicos Heliscope, and the Complete Genomics. It archives the sequencing data associated with RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Genomic and Transcriptomic assemblies, and 16S ribosomal RNA data.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. For the EOS satellite missions, EOSDIS provides capabilities for command and control, scheduling, data capture and initial (Level 0) processing. These capabilities, constituting the EOSDIS Mission Operations, are managed by the Earth Science Mission Operations (ESMO) Project. NASA network capabilities transport the data to the science operations facilities. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search (formerly: REVERB).
XNAT CENTRAL is a publicly accessible datasharing portal at Washinton University Medical School using XNAT software. XNAT provides neuroimaging data through a web interface and a customizable open source platform. XNAT facilitates data uploads and downloads for data sharing, processing and organization.
The National Trauma Data Bank® (NTDB) is the largest aggregation of trauma registry data ever assembled. The goal of the NTDB is to inform the medical community, the public, and decision makers about a wide variety of issues that characterize the current state of care for injured persons. Registry data that is collected from the NTDB is compiled annually and disseminated in the forms of hospital benchmark reports, data quality reports, and research data sets. Research data sets that can be used by researchers. To gain access to NTDB data, researchers must submit requests through our online application process
The GTN-P database is an object-related database open for a diverse range of data. Because of the complexity of the PAGE21 project, data provided in the GTN-P management system are extremely diverse, ranging from active-layer thickness measurements once per year to flux measurement every second and everthing else in between. The data can be assigned to two broad categories: Quantitative data which is all data that can be measured numerically. Quantitative data comprise all in situ measurements, i.e. permafrost temperatures and active layer thickness (mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, soil temperature profiles). Qualitative data (knowledge products) are observations not based on measurements, such as observations on soils, vegetation, relief, etc.