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Found 26 result(s)
The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is a database of intended for researchers to share information about cloud radiative properties. The data sets focus on the effects of clouds on the climate, the radiation budget, and the long-term hydrologic cycle. Within the data sets the data entries are broken down into entries of specific characteristics based on temporal resolution, spatial resolution, or temporal coverage.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
The Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is a national user facility with massive-scale DNA sequencing and analysis capabilities dedicated to advancing genomics for bioenergy and environmental applications. Beyond generating tens of trillions of DNA bases annually, the Institute develops and maintains data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data sets, and to enable an expanding community of users around the world to analyze these data in different contexts over the web. The JGI Genome Portal provides a unified access point to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. A user can find all DOE JGI sequencing projects and their status, search for and download assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes, and interactively explore those genomes and compare them with other sequenced microbes, fungi, plants or metagenomes using specialized systems tailored to each particular class of organisms. Databases: Genome Online Database (GOLD), Integrated Microbial Genomes (IGM), MycoCosm, Phytozome
Pubchem contains 3 databases. 1. PubChem BioAssay: The PubChem BioAssay Database contains bioactivity screens of chemical substances described in PubChem Substance. It provides searchable descriptions of each bioassay, including descriptions of the conditions and readouts specific to that screening procedure. 2. PubChem Compound: The PubChem Compound Database contains validated chemical depiction information provided to describe substances in PubChem Substance. Structures stored within PubChem Compounds are pre-clustered and cross-referenced by identity and similarity groups. 3. PubChem Substance. The PubChem Substance Database contains descriptions of samples, from a variety of sources, and links to biological screening results that are available in PubChem BioAssay. If the chemical contents of a sample are known, the description includes links to PubChem Compound.
The Reciprocal Net is a distributed database used by research crystallographers to store information about molecular structures; much of the data is available to the general public. The Reciprocal Net project is still under development. Currently, there are 18 participating crystallography laboratories online. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and part of the National Science Digital Library. The contents of this collection will come principally from structures contributed by participating crystallography laboratories, thus providing a means for teachers, students, and the general public to connect better with current chemistry research. The Reciprocal Net's emphasis is on obtaining structures of general interest and usefulness to those several classes of digital library users.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
TOXNET (TOXicology Data NETwork) is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology. Information in the TOXNET databases covers: Toxicology data: CCRIS (Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System), CPDB (Carcinogenic Potency Database), CTD (Comparative Toxicogenomics Database), GENE-TOX (Genetic Toxicology), HSDB® (Hazardous Substances Data Bank), Haz-Map®, Household Products Database, IRIS (Integrated Risk Information System), ITER (International Toxicity Estimates for Risk), LactMed® (Drugs and Lactation), TRI (Toxics Release Inventory), TOXMAP®, ; Chemical nomenclature: ChemIDplus; Toxicology literature: TOXLINE®, DART® (Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database).
The PeptideAtlas validates expressed proteins to provide eukaryotic genome data. Peptide Atlas provides data to advance biological discoveries in humans. The PeptideAtlas accepts proteomic data from high-throughput processes and encourages data submission.
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
This centre receives and archives precipitation chemistry data and complementary information from stations around the world. Data archived by this centre are accessible via connections with the WDCPC database. Freely available data from regional and national programmes with their own Web sites are accessible via links to these sites. The WDCPC is one of six World Data Centres in the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). The focus on precipitation chemistry is described in the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme. Guidance on all aspects of collecting precipitation for chemical analysis is provided in the Manual for the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme (WMO-GAW Report No. 160).
The Inter-regional Geomagnetic Data Center of the Russian-Ukrainian INTERMAGNET segment is operated by the Geophysical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (GC RAS). Geomagnetic data are transmitted from observatories and stations located in Russia and Ukraine. The particular feature of the Center is the automated system for real-time recognition of artificial (anthropogenic) disturbances in incoming data. Being based on fuzzy logic approach, this quality control system facilitates the preparation of the definitive magnetograms from preliminary records carried out by data experts manually. The collected geomagnetic data are stored using relational database management system. The geomagnetic database is intended for storing both 1-minute and 1-second data. The results of anthropogenic disturbance recognition are also stored in the database.
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The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
The ProteomeXchange consortium has been set up to provide a single point of submission of MS proteomics data to the main existing proteomics repositories, and to encourage the data exchange between them for optimal data dissemination. Current members accepting submissions are: The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database at the European Bioinformatics Institute focusing mainly on shotgun mass spectrometry proteomics data PeptideAtlas/PASSEL focusing on SRM/MRM datasets.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
With the creation of the Metabolomics Data Repository managed by Data Repository and Coordination Center (DRCC), the NIH acknowledges the importance of data sharing for metabolomics. Metabolomics represents the systematic study of low molecular weight molecules found in a biological sample, providing a "snapshot" of the current and actual state of the cell or organism at a specific point in time. Thus, the metabolome represents the functional activity of biological systems. As with other ‘omics’, metabolites are conserved across animals, plants and microbial species, facilitating the extrapolation of research findings in laboratory animals to humans. Common technologies for measuring the metabolome include mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which can measure hundreds to thousands of unique chemical entities. Data sharing in metabolomics will include primary raw data and the biological and analytical meta-data necessary to interpret these data. Through cooperation between investigators, metabolomics laboratories and data coordinating centers, these data sets should provide a rich resource for the research community to enhance preclinical, clinical and translational research.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is a freely available dictionary of 'small molecular entities'. The term 'molecular entity' encompasses any constitutionally or isotopically distinct atom, molecule, ion, ion pair, radical, radical ion, complex, conformer, etc., identifiable as a separately distinguishable entity. The molecular entities in question are either products of nature or synthetic products used to intervene in the processes of living organisms (either deliberately, as for drugs, or unintentionally', as for chemicals in the environment). The qualifier 'small' implies the exclusion of entities directly encoded by the genome, and thus as a rule nucleic acids, proteins and peptides derived from proteins by cleavage are not included.
The NCBI Trace Archive is a permanent repository of DNA sequence chromatograms (traces), base calls, and quality estimates for single-pass reads from various large-scale sequencing projects. The Trace Archive serves as the repository of sequencing data from gel/capillary platforms such as Applied Biosystems ABI 3730®. The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome Analyzer®, Applied Biosystems SOLiD® System, Helicos Heliscope®, and others. The Trace Assembly Archive stores pairwise alignment and multiple alignment of sequencing reads, linking basic trace data with finished genomic sequence.
ChEMBL is a database of bioactive drug-like small molecules, it contains 2-D structures, calculated properties (e.g. logP, Molecular Weight, Lipinski Parameters, etc.) and abstracted bioactivities (e.g. binding constants, pharmacology and ADMET data). The data is abstracted and curated from the primary scientific literature, and cover a significant fraction of the SAR and discovery of modern drugs We attempt to normalise the bioactivities into a uniform set of end-points and units where possible, and also to tag the links between a molecular target and a published assay with a set of varying confidence levels. Additional data on clinical progress of compounds is being integrated into ChEMBL at the current time.