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Found 107 result(s)
<<<!!!<<< The RDP website is no longer available. A stand-alone version of the RDP Classifier is available on Sorceforge https://sourceforge.net/projects/rdp-classifier/. Instructions for installing a command-line version of RDP Tools can be found at Dr. J.Quensen's Website https://john-quensen.com/tutorials/tutorial-1/ and https://jfq3.gitbook.io/rdptools-docker/rdptools-docker/readme. >>>!!!>>>
The Reference Sequence (RefSeq) collection provides a comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of sequences, including genomic DNA, transcripts, and proteins. RefSeq sequences form a foundation for medical, functional, and diversity studies. They provide a stable reference for genome annotation, gene identification and characterization, mutation and polymorphism analysis (especially RefSeqGene records), expression studies, and comparative analyses.
<<<!!!<<< The page is no longer available. This database was already retired, and on this page users could find information on how to search and use these sequences. dbSTS was an NCBI resource that contained sequence data for short genomic landmark sequences or Sequence Tagged Sites. STS sequences are incorporated into the STS Division of GenBank. >>>!!!>>>
The world’s largest collection of TCR and BCR sequences. Easily incorporate millions of sequences worth of public data into your next papers and projects using immunoSEQ Analyzer. Construct your own projects, draw your own conclusions, and freely publish new discoveries.
This resource allows users to search for and compare influenza virus genomes and gene sequences taken from GenBank. It also provides a virus sequence annotation tool and links to other influenza resources: NIAID project, JCVI Flu, Influenza research database, CDC Flu, Vaccine Selection and WHO Flu. NOTE: The redirects that are planned for completion by May 2024 will NOT impact the Influenza Virus Resource in any way. The Influenza Virus Resource will continue to be available, serving up data to support our Flu-research community.
This Web resource provides data and information relevant to SARS coronavirus. It includes links to the most recent sequence data and publications, to other SARS related resources, and a pre-computed alignment of genome sequences from various isolates. In order to provide free and easy access to genome and protein sequences and associated metadata from the SARS-CoV-2, we created a dedicated Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 data hub. You can access the Results Table on SARS-CoV-2 data hub, by pressing "RefSeq genomes", "nucleotide" or "protein" links on announcement banner located on NCBI home page, in "Find data" navigation menu or using "Up-to-date SARS-CoV-2" shortcut button in "Search by virus" form. SARS-CoV-2 sequences is part of NCBI Virus https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100014322
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
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The Canadian VirusSeq Data Portal (CVDP) is an open-access data portal funded by Genome Canada. It is intended to facilitate access to Canadian SARS-CoV-2 sequences and associated non-sensitive metadata adhering to the FAIR Data principles. Limited contextual metadata and viral genome sequences can be shared among Canadian public health labs, researchers and other groups interested in accessing the data for surveillance, research, and innovation purposes. The CVDP will harmonize, validate, and automate submission to international databases and enable the creation of real-time dashboards that summarize the Canadian data contributions while facilitating exploration and access. Sequences or metadata submitted to the CVDP may not include data that could reveal the personal identity of the source. Its is part of Canadian COVID Genomics Network (CanCOGeN).
IMGT/GENE-DB is the IMGT genome database for IG and TR genes from human, mouse and other vertebrates. IMGT/GENE-DB provides a full characterization of the genes and of their alleles: IMGT gene name and definition, chromosomal localization, number of alleles, and for each allele, the IMGT allele functionality, and the IMGT reference sequences and other sequences from the literature. IMGT/GENE-DB allele reference sequences are available in FASTA format (nucleotide and amino acid sequences with IMGT gaps according to the IMGT unique numbering, or without gaps).
The project aims to examine and index the genomic diversity through the generation of complete mitochondrial and nuclear genome sequences of sharks and rays of the Pacific Rim. There is a huge diversity of elasmobranch fishes in this region, but many species are under threat because of poor management and conservation measures in many countries. It is absolutely critical that species’ identities are correct for conservation and fisheries management purposes. This project will provide this clarity of identity for both charismatic and commercially important species through the inclusion of ‘genetypes’ (ie., BioVouchers) and the application of genetic tools that utilize whole mitochondrial and nuclear genome sequences.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
<<<!!!<<< Retirement of UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES): UniProt has retired UniMES as there is now a resource at the EBI that is dedicated to serving metagenomic researchers. Henceforth, we recommend using the EBI Metagenomics portal instead https://www.ebi.ac.uk/metagenomics/ . In addition to providing a repository of metagenomics sequence data, EBI Metagenomics allows you to view functional and taxonomic analyses and to submit your own samples for analysis. >>>!!!>>> The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. We provide UniMES clusters in order to obtain complete coverage of sequence space at different resolutions.
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A collection of high quality multiple sequence alignments for objective, comparative studies of alignment algorithms. The alignments are constructed based on 3D structure superposition and manually refined to ensure alignment of important functional residues. A number of subsets are defined covering many of the most important problems encountered when aligning real sets of proteins. It is specifically designed to serve as an evaluation resource to address all the problems encountered when aligning complete sequences. The first release provided sets of reference alignments dealing with the problems of high variability, unequal repartition and large N/C-terminal extensions and internal insertions. Version 2.0 of the database incorporates three new reference sets of alignments containing structural repeats, trans-membrane sequences and circular permutations to evaluate the accuracy of detection/prediction and alignment of these complex sequences. Within the resource, users can look at a list of all the alignments, download the whole database by ftp, get the "c" program to compare a test alignment with the BAliBASE reference (The source code for the program is freely available), or look at the results of a comparison study of several multiple alignment programs, using BAliBASE reference sets.
<<<!!!<<< This repository is no longer available>>>!!!>>>. Although the web pages are no longer available, you will still be able to download the final UniGene builds as static content from the FTP site https://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/repository/UniGene/. You will also be able to match UniGene cluster numbers to Gene records by searching Gene with UniGene cluster numbers. For best results, restrict to the “UniGene Cluster Number” field rather than all fields in Gene. For example, a search with Mm.2108[UniGene Cluster Number] finds the mouse transthyretin Gene record (Ttr). You can use the advanced search page https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/advanced to help construct these searches. Keep in mind that the Gene record contains selected Reference Sequences and GenBank mRNA sequences rather than the larger set of expressed sequences in the UniGene cluster.
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.
The Restriction Enzyme Database is a collection of information about restriction enzymes, methylases, the microorganisms from which they have been isolated, recognition sequences, cleavage sites, methylation specificity, the commercial availability of the enzymes, and references - both published and unpublished observations (dating back to 1952). REBASE is updated daily and is constantly expanding.
The UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef) provide clustered sets of sequences from the UniProt Knowledgebase (including isoforms) and selected UniParc records in order to obtain complete coverage of the sequence space at several resolutions while hiding redundant sequences (but not their descriptions) from view.
Established by the HLA Informatics Group of the Anthony Nolan Research Institute, IPD provides a centralized system for studying the immune system's polymorphism in genes. The IPD maintains databases concerning the sequences of human Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), sequences of the major histocompatibility complex in a number of species, human platelet antigens (HPA), and tumor cell lines. Each subject has related, credible news, current research and publications, and a searchable database for highly specific, research grade genetic information.
<<<!!!<<< Efforts to obtain renewed funding after 2008 were unfortunately not successful. PANDIT has therefore been frozen since November 2008, and its data are not updated since September 2005 when version 17.0 was released (corresponding to Pfam 17.0). The existing data and website remain available from these pages, and should remain stable and, we hope, useful. >>>!!!>>> PANDIT is a collection of multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees. It contains corresponding amino acid and nucleotide sequence alignments, with trees inferred from each alignment. PANDIT is based on the Pfam database (Protein families database of alignments and HMMs), and includes the seed amino acid alignments of most families in the Pfam-A database. DNA sequences for as many members of each family as possible are extracted from the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and aligned according to the amino acid alignment. PANDIT also contains a further copy of the amino acid alignments, restricted to the sequences for which DNA sequences were found.
The miRBase database is a searchable database of published miRNA sequences and annotation. Each entry in the miRBase Sequence database represents a predicted hairpin portion of a miRNA transcript (termed mir in the database), with information on the location and sequence of the mature miRNA sequence (termed miR). Both hairpin and mature sequences are available for searching and browsing, and entries can also be retrieved by name, keyword, references and annotation. All sequence and annotation data are also available for download. The miRBase Registry provides miRNA gene hunters with unique names for novel miRNA genes prior to publication of results.