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Found 113 result(s)
The IGS global system of satellite tracking stations, Data Centers, and Analysis Centers puts high-quality GPS data and data products on line in near real time to meet the objectives of a wide range of scientific and engineering applications and studies. The IGS collects, archives, and distributes GPS observation data sets of sufficient accuracy to satisfy the objectives of a wide range of applications and experimentation. These data sets are used by the IGS to generate the data products mentioned above which are made available to interested users through the Internet. In particular, the accuracies of IGS products are sufficient for the improvement and extension of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), the monitoring of solid Earth deformations, the monitoring of Earth rotation and variations in the liquid Earth (sea level, ice-sheets, etc.), for scientific satellite orbit determinations, ionosphere monitoring, and recovery of precipitable water vapor measurements.
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Geoscientific Data & Discovery Publishing Center (GDD) is based on the geological scientific data generated globally, establishing policies and systems for the scientific data publishing, absorbing the concepts and methods of international open data, and joint Digital Object Unique Identifier-DOI registration agencies to provide standard data reference formats and permanent access address for data references, doing publishing through the Internet platform, which combines innovation and advance. GDD mainly includes data descriptor and entity data publishing. The data papers describe entity data and corresponding metadata information. The entity data includes common shared data such as geographic information, geologic maps, and databases, and also includes multiple data types, such as documents, archive records, data forms and other multimedia formed during geological work, various data-centric applications, database interface services, and typical data services.
Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) was launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit on December 18, 1999, aboard TERRA, a NASA satellite orbiting 705 km above the Earth. MOPITT monitors changes in pollution patterns and the effects on Earth’s troposphere. MOPITT uses near-infrared radiation at 2.3 µm and thermal-infrared radiation at 4.7 µm to calculate atmospheric profiles of CO.
ERDDAP is a data server that gives you a simple, consistent way to download subsets of gridded and tabular scientific datasets in common file formats and make graphs and maps. This particular ERDDAP installation has oceanographic data (for example, data from satellites and buoys).
As 3D and reality capture strategies for heritage documentation become more widespread and available, there has emerged a growing need to assist with guiding and facilitating accessibility to data, while maintaining scientific rigor, cultural and ethical sensitivity, discoverability, and archival standards. In response to these areas of need, The Open Heritage 3D Alliance (OHA) has developed as an advisory group governing the Open Heritage 3D initiative. This collaborative advisory group are among some of the earliest adopters of 3D heritage documentation technologies, and offer first-hand guidance for best practices in data management, sharing, and dissemination approaches for 3D cultural heritage projects. The founding members of the OHA, consist of experts and organizational leaders from CyArk, Historic Environment Scotland, and the University of South Florida Libraries, who together have significant repositories of legacy and on-going 3D research and documentation projects. These groups offer unique insight into not only the best practices for 3D data capture and sharing, but also have come together around concerns dealing with standards, formats, approach, ethics, and archive commitment. Together, the OHA has begun the journey to provide open access to cultural heritage 3D data, while maintaining integrity, security, and standards relating to discoverable dissemination. Together, the OHA will work to provide democratized access to primary heritage 3D data submitted from donors and organizations, and will help to facilitate an operation platform, archive, and organization of resources into the future.
GRID-Geneva is a unique platform providing analyses and solutions for a wide range of environmental issues. GRID-Geneva serves primarily the needs of its three institutional partners - UNEP, the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) and the University of Geneva (UniGe) - which are linked by an ongoing, multi-year “Partnership Agreement”, along with other local-to-global stakeholders. GRID-Geneva is also a bilingual English and French centre and the key francophone link within the global GRID network of centres. GRID-Geneva is a key centre of geo-spatial know-how, with strengths in GIS, IP/remote sensing and statistical analyses, integrated through modern spatial data infrastructures and web applications. Working at the interface between scientific information and policy/decision-making, GRID-Geneva also helps to develop capacities in these fields of expertise among target audiences, countries and other groups.
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
The ASTER Project consists of two parts, each having a Japanese and a U.S. component. Mission operations are split between Japan Space Systems (J-spacesystems) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the U.S. J-spacesystems oversees monitoring instrument performance and health, developing the daily schedule command sequence, processing Level 0 data to Level 1, and providing higher level data processing, archiving, and distribution. The JPL ASTER project provides scheduling support for U.S. investigators, calibration and validation of the instrument and data products, coordinating the U.S. Science Team, and maintaining the science algorithms. The joint Japan/U.S. ASTER Science Team has about 40 scientists and researchers. Data access via NASA Reverb, ASTER Japan site, earth explorer, GloVis,GDEx and LP DAAC. See here https://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/data.asp. In Addition data are availabe through the newly implemented ASTER Volcano archive (AVA) https://ava.jpl.nasa.gov/ .
ISRIC - World Soil Information is an independent foundation. As regular member of the ICS World Data System it is also known as World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils). ISRIC was founded in 1966 through the International Soil Science Society (ISSS) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), with a mission to "help to increase the availability and use of soil data, information and knowledge to enable better decision making for sustainable land management around the world". Our work is organised according to four work streams: 1) Global soil information & standards, 2) Community of practice for soil information providers, 3) Products and services to support SLM (sustainable land management) decision making, and 4) Awareness, education and dialogues. data.isric.org is our central location for searching and downloading soil data bases/maps from around the world. We support Open Data whenever possible, respecting inherited rights (licenses).
HITRAN is an acronym for high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database. The HITRAN compilation of the SAO (HIgh resolution TRANmission molecular absorption database) is used for predicting and simulating transmission and emission of light in atmospheres. It is the world-standard database in molecular spectroscopy. The journal article describing it is the most cited reference in the geosciences. There are presently about 5000 HITRAN users world-wide. Its associated database HITEMP (high-temperature spectroscopic absorption parameters) is accessible by the HITRAN website.
The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected, modified and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK, including imagery from ERS satellites, ENVISAT and ALOS, high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and aerial photography dating back to 1930. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. Aside from the thermal imagery data which stands alone, the data reside in four collections: optical, elevation, radar and feature.
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Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
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Survey of India, The National Survey and Mapping Organization of the country under the Department of Science & Technology, is the OLDEST SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT OF THE GOVT. OF INDIA. It was set up in 1767 and has evolved rich traditions over the years. In its assigned role as the nation's Principal Mapping Agency, Survey of India bears a special responsibility to ensure that the country's domain is explored and mapped suitably, provide base maps for expeditious and integrated development and ensure that all resources contribute with their full measure to the progress, prosperity and security of our country now and for generations to come. The history of the Survey of India dates back to the 18th Century. Forerunners of army of the East India Company and Surveyors had an onerous task of exploring the unknown. Bit by bit the tapestry of Indian terrain was completed by the painstaking efforts of a distinguished line of Surveyors such as Mr. Lambton and Sir George Everest. It is a tribute to the foresight of such Surveyors that at the time of independence the country inherited a survey network built on scientific principles. The great Trigonometric series spanning the country from North to South East to West are some of the best geodetic control series available in the world. The scientific principles of surveying have since been augmented by the latest technology to meet the multidisciplinary requirement of data from planners and scientists. Organized into only 5 Directorates in 1950, mainly to look after the mapping needs of Defense Forces in North West and North East, the Department has now grown into 22 Directorates spread in approx. all parts (states) of the country to provide the basic map coverage required for the development of the country. Its technology, latest in the world, has been oriented to meet the needs of defense forces, planners and scientists in the field of geo-sciences, land and resource management. Its expert advice is being utilized by various Ministries and undertakings of Govt. of India in many sensitive areas including settlement of International borders, State boundaries and in assisting planned development of hitherto under developed areas. Faced with the requirement of digital topographical data, the department has created three Digital Centers during late eighties to generate Digital Topographical Data Base for the entire country for use in various planning processes and creation of geographic information system. Its specialized Directorates such as Geodetic and Research Branch, and Indian Institute of Surveying & Mapping (erstwhile Survey Training Institute) have been further strengthened to meet the growing requirement of user community. The department is also assisting in many scientific programs of the Nation related to the field of geo-physics, remote sensing and digital data transfers.
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
As part of the Copernicus Space Component programme, ESA manages the coordinated access to the data procured from the various Contributing Missions and the Sentinels, in response to the Copernicus users requirements. The Data Access Portfolio documents the data offer and the access rights per user category. The CSCDA portal is the access point to all data, including Sentinel missions, for Copernicus Core Users as defined in the EU Copernicus Programme Regulation (e.g. Copernicus Services).The Copernicus Space Component (CSC) Data Access system is the interface for accessing the Earth Observation products from the Copernicus Space Component. The system overall space capacity relies on several EO missions contributing to Copernicus, and it is continuously evolving, with new missions becoming available along time and others ending and/or being replaced.
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Chinese National Arctic & Antarctic Data Center(CN-NADC) is a national facility within the Polar research institute of China (PRIC), which is a research institute under the State Oceanic Administration (SOA) of China. CN-NADC was established in response to Chinese participation in the Article III.1.c of Antarctic Treaty System - (ATS — http://www.ats.aq) and Chinese Polar Data Policy(http://www.chinare.org.cn/standardDetail/?id=477). CN-NADC serves as the only authorized institution in China to capture, standard manage and long-term preserve the data and samples information, and to provide sustainable polar data service. In 2003, CN-NADC became one of the nodes of ‘National Data Sharing Infrastructure of Earth Science’ (GEODATA,http://www2.geodata.cn/), which’s one of the Platforms of the National Science and Technology Infrastructures (NSTI, http://www.escience.org.cn//) supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) and the Ministry of Finance of People’s Republic of China.
The objective of this database is to stimulate the exchange of information and the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community. However, this community is not exclusive and researchers not directly involved in ChArMEx, but who wish to contribute to the achievements of ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals are welcome to join-in. The database is a depository for all the data collected during the various projects that contribute to ChArMEx coordinated program. It aims at documenting, storing and distributing the data produced or used by the project community. However, it is also intended to host datasets that were produced outside the ChArMEx program but which are meaningful to ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals. Any data owner who wishes to add or link his dataset to ChArMEx database is welcome to contact the database manager in order to get help and support. The ChArMEx database includes past and recent geophysical in situ observations, satellite products and model outputs. The database organizes the data management and provides data services to end-users of ChArMEx data. The database system provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats whenever it is possible. It defines the access rules to the data and details the mutual rights and obligations of data providers and users (see ChArMEx data and publication policy). The database is being developed jointly by : SEDOO, OMP Toulouse , ICARE, Lille and ESPRI, IPSL Paris
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GEOFON seeks to facilitate cooperation in seismological research and earthquake and tsunami hazard mitigation by providing rapid transnational access to seismological data and source parameters of large earthquakes, and keeping these data accessible in the long term. It pursues these aims by operating and maintaining a global network of permanent broadband stations in cooperation with local partners, facilitating real time access to data from this network and those of many partner networks and plate boundary observatories, providing a permanent and secure archive for seismological data. It also archives and makes accessible data from temporary experiments carried out by scientists at German universities and institutions, thereby fostering cooperation and encouraging the full exploitation of all acquired data and serving as the permanent archive for the Geophysical Instrument Pool at Potsdam (GIPP). It also organises the data exchange of real-time and archived data with partner institutions and international centres.
The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) onboard the ENVISAT satellite provided atmospheric infrared limb emission spectra. From these, profiles of temperature and atmospheric trace gases were retrieved using the research data processor developed at the Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung (IMK), which is complemented by the component of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) treatment from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA). The MIPAS data products on this server are commonly known as IMK/IAA MIPAS Level2 data products. The MIPAS instrument measured during two time frames: from 2002 to 2004 in full spectral resolution (high resolution = HR aka full resolution = FR), and from 2005 to 2012 in reduced spectral, but improved spatial resolution (reduced resolution = RR aka optimized resolution = OR). For this reason, there are different version numbers covering the full MIPAS mission period: xx for the HR/FR period, and 2xx for the RR/OR period (example: 61 for HR/FR, 261 for RR/OR). Beyond this, measurements were conducted in different modes covering different altitude ranges during the RR period: Nominal (6 – 70 km), MA (18 – 102 km), NLC (39 – 102 km), UA (42 – 172 km), UTLS-1 (5.5 – 19 km), UTLS-2 (12 – 42 km), AE (7 – 38 km). The non-nominal modes are identified by the following version numbers: MA = 5xx, NLC = 7xx, UA = 6xx, UTLS-1/2 = 1xx (no retrievals for AE mode).
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
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CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) is a German small satellite mission for geoscientific and atmospheric research and applications, managed by GFZ. With its highly precise, multifunctional and complementary payload elements (magnetometer, accelerometer, star sensor, GPS receiver, laser retro reflector, ion drift meter) and its orbit characteristics (near polar, low altitude, long duration) CHAMP will generate for the first time simultaneously highly precise gravity and magnetic field measurements over a 5 years period. This will allow to detect besides the spatial variations of both fields also their variability with time. The CHAMP mission had opened a new era in geopotential research and had become a significant contributor to the Decade of Geopotentials. In addition with the radio occultation measurements onboard the spacecraft and the infrastructure developed on ground, CHAMP had become a pilot mission for the pre-operational use of space-borne GPS observations for atmospheric and ionospheric research and applications in weather prediction and space weather monitoring. End of the mission of CHAMP was at September 19 2010, after ten years, two month and four days, after 58277 orbits.