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Found 113 result(s)
The Online Data Portal (ODP) is an evolving project to support collaborative river restoration projects, such as the TRRP. The goal is to provide a centralized clearing house of documents and data for program partners, stakeholders, and the public. The functionality and data holdings will continue to be expanded over the next few years. The ability to store Data Packages is new as of Fall 2011 and holdings should expand substantially in the months afterward. A project to scan many older documents also began in December 2011. Simple time-series datasets have long been stored in the ODP, but holdings of these data are likely to increase as TRRP implements an upcoming Data Management and Utility Plan. Major upgrades to the Interactive Map are expected to start in winter and spring of 2012. The long term vision is that many data resources will be accessible both by text searches and via the Interactive Map. The ODP will be available for use by other river restoration programs. ODP is followed by TRRP DataPort.
The International Center for Global Earth Models collects and distributes historical and actual global gravity field models of the Earth and offers calculation service for derived quantities. In particular the tasks include: collecting and archiving of all existing global gravity field models, web interface for getting access to global gravity field models, web based visualization of the gravity field models their differences and their time variation, web based service for calculating different functionals of the gravity field models, web site for tutorials on spherical harmonics and the theory of the calculation service. As new service since 2016, ICGEM is providing a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for the data set of the model (the coefficients).
The Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS) is a trusted data repository that provides free public access to a curated collection of marine geophysical data products and complementary data related to understanding the formation and evolution of the seafloor and sub-seafloor. Developed and operated by domain scientists and technical specialists with deep knowledge about the creation, analysis and scientific interpretation of marine geoscience data, the system makes available a digital library of data files described by a rich curated metadata catalog. MGDS provides tools and services for the discovery and download of data collected throughout the global oceans. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
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Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring. In 2007, RADARSAT-2 was launched, producing over 75,000 images per year since. In 2019, the RADARSAT Constellation Mission was deployed, using its three-satellite configuration for all-condition coverage. More information about RADARSAT-2 see https://mda.space/en/geo-intelligence/ RADARSAT-2 PORTAL see https://gsiportal.mda.space/gc_cp/#/map
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Sextant is a marine and coastal geographic data infrastructure. It is operated by Scientific Information Systems for the Sea (SISMER) of Ifremer (https://www.ifremer.fr/). Sextant aims to document, disseminate and promote a catalog of data related to the marine environment. For Ifremer's laboratories and partners, as well as for national and European actors working in the marine and coastal field, Sextant provides tools that promote and facilitate the archiving, consultation and availability of these geographical data. Data published by Sextant are available free or restricted. They can be used in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons license selected by the author of data. Sextant infrastructure and the technologies used are in line with the implementation of the INSPIRE Directive and make it possible to follow the Open Data approach. Some data set published by Sextant has a DOI which enables it to be cited in a publication in a reliable and sustainable way. The long-term preservation of data filed in Sextant is ensured by Ifremer infrastructure.
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
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The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
High spatial resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. The WorldPop project aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access population distribution datasets built using transparent approaches. The WorldPop project was initiated in October 2013 to combine the AfriPop, AsiaPop and AmeriPop population mapping projects. It aims to provide an open access archive of spatial demographic datasets for Central and South America, Africa and Asia to support development, disaster response and health applications. The methods used are designed with full open access and operational application in mind, using transparent, fully documented and peer-reviewed methods to produce easily updatable maps with accompanying metadata and measures of uncertainty.
The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which flew aboard NASA's Space Shuttle Endeavour during an 11-day mission in 2000, made the first near-global topographical map of Earth, collecting data on nearly 80 percent of Earth's land surfaces. The instrument's design was essentially a modified version of the earlier Shuttle Imaging Radar instruments with a second antenna added to allow for topographic mapping using a technique similar to stereo photography.
TerraSAR-X is a German satellite for Earth Observation, which was launched on July 14, 2007. The mission duration was foreseen to be 5 years. TerraSAR-X carries an innovative high resolution x-band sensor for imaging with resolution up to 1 m. TerraSAR-X carries as secondary payload an IGOR GPS receiver with GPS RO capability. GFZ provided the IGOR and is responsible for the related TOR experiment (Tracking, Occultation and Ranging). TerraSAR-X provides continuously atmospheric GPS data in near-real time. These data from GFZ are continuously assimilated in parallel with those from GRACE-A by the world-leading weather centers to improve their global forecasts. TerraSAR-X, together with TanDEM-X also forms a twin-satellite constellation for atmosphere sounding and generates an unique data set for the evaluation of the accuracy of the GPS-RO technique.
The name Earth Online derives from ESA's Earthnet programme. Earthnet prepares and attracts new ESA Earth Observation missions by setting the international cooperation scheme, preparing the basic infrastructure, building the scientific and application Community and competency in Europe to define and set-up own European Programmes in consultation with member states. Earth Online is the entry point for scientific-technical information on Earth Observation activities by the European Space Agency (ESA). The web portal provides a vast amount of content, grown and collected over more than a decade: Detailed technical information on Earth Observation (EO) missions; Satellites and sensors; EO data products & services; Online resources such as catalogues and library; Applications of satellite data; Access to promotional satellite imagery. After 10 years of operations on distinct sites, the two principal portals of ESA Earth Observation - Earth Online (earth.esa.int) and the Principal Investigator's Portal (eopi.esa.int) have moved to a new platform. ESA's technical and scientific earth observation user communities will from now on be served from a single portal, providing a modern and easy-to-use interface to our services and data.
CARIBIC is an innovative scientific project to study and monitor important chemical and physical processes in the Earth´s atmosphere. Detailed and extensive measurements are made during long distance flights. We deploy an airfreight container with automated scientific apparatus which are connected to an air and particle (aerosol) inlet underneath the aircraft. We use an Airbus A340-600 from Lufthansa since December 2004.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.