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Found 93 result(s)
The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Data and Specimen Hub (DASH) is a centralized resource that allows researchers to share and access de-identified data from studies funded by NICHD. DASH also serves as a portal for requesting biospecimens from selected DASH studies.
The dbVar is a database of genomic structural variation containing data from multiple gene studies. Users can browse data containing the number of variant cells from each study, and filter studies by organism, study type, method and genomic variant. Organisms include human, mouse, cattle and several additional animals. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017 ***
The Connectome Coordination Facility (CCF) houses and distributes public research data for a series of studies that focus on the connections within the human brain. These are known as Human Connectome Projects. he Connectome Coordination Facility (CCF) was chartered to help coordinate myriad research projects, harmonize their data, and facilitate the dissemination of results.
BioLINCC is the Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Coordinating Center. The center coordinates data and biospecimens from NHLBI-funded studies that are available for use in other approved studies. The center also creates teaching data sets from NHLBI-funded studies for use in training future biostatisticians.
The ISRCTN registry is a primary clinical trial registry recognised by WHO and ICMJE that accepts all clinical research studies (whether proposed, ongoing or completed), providing content validation and curation and the unique identification number necessary for publication. All study records in the database are freely accessible and searchable. ISRCTN supports transparency in clinical research, helps reduce selective reporting of results and ensures an unbiased and complete evidence base. ISRCTN accepts all studies involving human subjects or populations with outcome measures assessing effects on human health and well-being, including studies in healthcare, social care, education, workplace safety and economic development.
ClinicalTrials.gov is a website and online database of clinical research studies and information about their results. The purpose of ClinicalTrials.gov is to provide information about clinical research studies to the public, researchers, and health care professionals. The U.S. government does not review or approve the safety and science of all studies listed on this website.
The Reference Sequence (RefSeq) collection provides a comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of sequences, including genomic DNA, transcripts, and proteins. RefSeq sequences form a foundation for medical, functional, and diversity studies. They provide a stable reference for genome annotation, gene identification and characterization, mutation and polymorphism analysis (especially RefSeqGene records), expression studies, and comparative analyses.
The Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF) contains population panel data from Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Korea, Russia, Switzerland and the United States. Each of these countries undertakes a longitudinal household economic survey. The data are made equivalent, providing a reference dataset which cross-links each of the individual studies and allowing cross-national comparisons.
NASA Life Sciences Portal is the next generation of the Life Sciences Data Archive for Human, Animal and Plant Research NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) conducts research and develops technologies that allow humans to travel safely and productively in space. The Program uses evidence from data collected on astronauts, as well as other supporting studies. These data are stored in the research data repository, Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA).
In 2003, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at NIH established Data, Biosample, and Genetic Repositories to increase the impact of current and previously funded NIDDK studies by making their data and biospecimens available to the broader scientific community. These Repositories enable scientists not involved in the original study to test new hypotheses without any new data or biospecimen collection, and they provide the opportunity to pool data across several studies to increase the power of statistical analyses. In addition, most NIDDK-funded studies are collecting genetic biospecimens and carrying out high-throughput genotyping making it possible for other scientists to use Repository resources to match genotypes to phenotypes and to perform informative genetic analyses.
The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) is a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. It was designed to advance the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors. In particular, the project examined the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence. At the same time, the project also provided a detailed look at the environments in which these social behaviors take place by collecting substantial amounts of data about urban Chicago, including its people, institutions, and resources. Nearly all PHDCN data require an individual application with supporting materials to obtain the data. Applications are handled by the the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD). Further instructions will appear on the study home page (linked from search results), where relevant.
The NCBI database of Genotypes and Phenotypes archives and distributes the results of studies that have investigated the interaction of genotype and phenotype, including genome-wide association studies, medical sequencing, molecular diagnostic assays, and association between genotype and non-clinical traits. The database provides summaries of studies, the contents of measured variables, and original study document text. dbGaP provides two types of access for users, open and controlled. Through the controlled access, users may access individual-level data such as phenotypic data tables and genotypes.
ARCHE (A Resource Centre for the HumanitiEs) is a service aimed at offering stable and persistent hosting as well as dissemination of digital research data and resources for the Austrian humanities community. ARCHE welcomes data from all humanities fields. ARCHE is the successor of the Language Resources Portal (LRP) and acts as Austria’s connection point to the European network of CLARIN Centres for language resources.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
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The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database is a collection of hand curated breakpoints and other genomic features, related to autism, taken from publicly available literature: databases and unpublished data. The database is continuously updated with information from in-house experimental data as well as data from published research studies.
Country
CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.
The United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries (USTUR) is a research program that studies actinide elements deposited within the human body – in persons with measurable, documented exposures to those elements.
The Progenetix database provides an overview of copy number abnormalities in human cancer from currently 32548 array and chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) experiments, as well as Whole Genome or Whole Exome Sequencing (WGS, WES) studies. The cancer profile data in Progenetix was curated from 1031 articles and represents 366 different cancer types, according to the International classification of Diseases in Oncology (ICD-O).
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The Australian National Corpus collates and provides access to assorted examples of Australian English text, transcriptions, audio and audio-visual materials. Text analysis tools are embedded in the interface allowing analysis and downloads in *.CSV format.
A place where researchers can publicly store and share unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases produced by MRI and PET studies.
The GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) is a consortium of laboratories working to provide the scientific and medical community with tools to facilitate research. The key components are: (1) a molecular atlas of gene expression for the developing organs of the GenitoUrinary (GU) tract; (2) a high resolution molecular anatomy that highlights development of the GU system; (3) mouse strains to facilitate developmental and functional studies within the GU system; (4) tutorials describing GU organogenesis; and (5) rapid access to primary data via the GUDMAP database.
The Human Mortality Database (HMD) was created to provide detailed mortality and population data to researchers, students, journalists, policy analysts, and others interested in the history of human longevity. The Human Mortality Database (HMD) contains original calculations of death rates and life tables for national populations (countries or areas), as well as the input data used in constructing those tables. The input data consist of death counts from vital statistics, plus census counts, birth counts, and population estimates from various sources.
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DAIS - Digital Archive of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts is a joint digital repository of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (SASA) and the research institutes under the auspices of SASA. The aim of the repository is to provide open access to publications and other research outputs resulting from the projects implemented by the SASA and its institutes. The repository uses a DSpace-based software platform developed and maintained by the Belgrade University Computer Centre (RCUB).
The GWAS Catalog is an open access repository of all human genome wide association studies. It is considered the “go-to” resource for genetic evidence of associations between common genetic variation and diseases or phenotypes, is accessed by scientists, clinicians and other users worldwide, and is integrated with numerous other resources. Association data and metadata are identified and extracted from the scientific literature by expert data curators. Submissions of full genome wide summary data can be made directly by authors, either before or after journal publication.