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Found 13 result(s)
The NCBI Short Genetic Variations database, commonly known as dbSNP, catalogs short variations in nucleotide sequences from a wide range of organisms. These variations include single nucleotide variations, short nucleotide insertions and deletions, short tandem repeats and microsatellites. Short Genetic Variations may be common, thus representing true polymorphisms, or they may be rare. Some rare human entries have additional information associated withthem, including disease associations, genotype information and allele origin, as some variations are somatic rather than germline events. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017***
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Dog Genome SNP Database (DoGSD) is a data container for the variation information of dog/wolf genomes. It was designed and constructed as an SNPs detector and visualization tool to provide the research community a useful resource for the study of dog's population, evolution, phenotype and life habit.
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
Genomic Expression Archive (GEA) is a public database of functional genomics data such as gene expression, epigenetics and genotyping SNP array. Both microarray- and sequence-based data are accepted in the MAGE-TAB format in compliance with MIAME and MINSEQE guidelines, respectively. GEA issues accession numbers, E-GEAD-n to experiment and A-GEAD-n to array design. Data exchange between GEA and EBI ArrayExpress is planned.
Genome track alignments using GBrowse on this site are featured with: (1) Annotated and predicted genes and transcripts; (2) QTL / SNP Association tracks; (3) OMIA genes; (4) Various SNP Chip tracks; (5) Other mapping fetures or elements that are available.
Bioconductor provides tools for the analysis and comprehension of high-throughput genomic data. Bioconductor uses the R statistical programming language, and is open source and open development. It has two releases each year, and an active user community. Bioconductor is also available as an AMI (Amazon Machine Image) and a series of Docker images.
This Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database (Animal QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and trait mapping data (i.e. trait and genome location association data; collectively called "QTL data" on this site) on livestock animal species for easily locating and making comparisons within and between species. New database tools are continuely added to align the QTL and association data to other types of genome information, such as annotated genes, RH / SNP markers, and human genome maps. Besides the QTL data from species listed below, the QTLdb is open to house QTL/association date from other animal species where feasible. Note that the JAS along with other journals, now require that new QTL/association data be entered into a QTL database as part of their publication requirements.
ViPR, the Virus Pathogen Resource, is a publicly available, NIAID-sponsored one-stop database and analysis resource that supports the research of viral pathogens in the NIAID Category A-C Priority Pathogen lists and those causing (re)emerging infectious diseases. ViPR integrates data from external sources (GenBank, UniProt, Immune Epitope Database, Protein Data Bank, etc.), direct submissions, and internal curation and analysis pipelines, and provides a suite of bioinformatics analysis and visualization tools to expedite virology research.
The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) is designed to be a repository for all types of sequence and genotype experiments, including case-control, population, and family studies. We will include SNP and CNV genotypes from array based methods and genotyping done with re-sequencing methods. The EGA will serve as a permanent archive that will archive several levels of data including the raw data (which could, for example, be re-analysed in the future by other algorithms) as well as the genotype calls provided by the submitters. We are developing data mining and access tools for the database. For controlled access data, the EGA will provide the necessary security required to control access, and maintain patient confidentiality, while providing access to those researchers and clinicians authorised to view the data. In all cases, data access decisions will be made by the appropriate data access-granting organisation (DAO) and not by the EGA. The DAO will normally be the same organisation that approved and monitored the initial study protocol or a designate of this approving organisation. The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) allows you to explore datasets from genomic studies, provided by a range of data providers. Access to datasets must be approved by the specified Data Access Committee (DAC).
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.
In early 2010 we updated the site to facilitate more rapid transfer of our data to the public database and focus our efforts on the core mission of providing expression pattern images to the research community. The original database http://www.fruitfly.org/index.html reproduced functions available on FlyBase, complicating our updates by the requirement to re-synchronize with FlyBase updates. Our expression reports on the new site still link to FlyBase gene reports, but we no longer reproduce FlyBase functions and therefore can update expression data on an ongoing basis instead of more infrequent major releases. All the functions relating to the expression patterns remain and we soon will add an option to search expression patterns by image similarity, in addition to annotation term searches. In a transitional phase we will leave both the old and the new sites up, but the newer data (post Release 2) will appear only on the new website. We welcome any feedback or requests for additional features. - The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.