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Found 36 result(s)
The Repository of Psychological Instruments in Serbian (REPOPSI), run by the Laboratory for Research of Individual Differences at the University of Belgrade and hosted on the Open Science Framework, is an open-access repository of psychological instruments. REPOPSI is a collection of psychological measures, scales, tests, and other research instruments commonly used in social and behavioral science research. Documented are Serbian, English and multilingual instruments, which can be used free of charge for non-commercial purposes (e.g., academic research or education).
AIRS moves climate research and weather prediction into the 21st century. AIRS is one of six instruments on board the Aqua satellite, part of the NASA Earth Observing System. AIRS along with its partner microwave instrument the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit AMSU-A, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. Together these instruments observe the global water and energy cycles, climate variation and trends, and the response of the climate system to increased greenhouse gases.
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<<<!!!<<< This repository is no longer available. >>>!!!>>> Japan Space Systems (J-spacesystems) aims to contribute to the advancement of Japanese industry, space systems technology, conservation of the earth environment, utilization of the space environment, and other research and development efforts. The system provides access to data from unmanned space missions and remote sensing instruments.
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
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Research Data Centre Education is a service offered by the German Institute for International Educational Research, for the purpose of a comprehensive and permanent documentation of empirical educational research studies. This service offers a central access point to describing information on studies, assessment instruments used and assessed research data, as well as publications.
SOHO, the Solar & Heliospheric Observatory, is a project of international collaboration between ESA and NASA to study the Sun from its deep core to the outer corona and the solar wind. SOHO was launched on December 2, 1995. The SOHO spacecraft was built in Europe by an industry team led by prime contractor Matra Marconi Space (now EADS Astrium) under overall management by ESA. The twelve instruments on board SOHO were provided by European and American scientists.
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The Research Data Centre Education is a focal point for empirical educational research regarding the archiving and retrieval of audiovisual research data (AV) data and survey instruments (questionnaires and tests). In Research Data Centre Education relevant for empirical educational research data sets and tools for secondary use are provided conform with data protection via a central data repository. Contextual information for each origin study and data and instruments as well as related publications complete the offer. Content of Research Data Centre Education formation (so far) focuses on instruments and data sets of Schulqualitäts- and teaching quality research. Observation and interview data in the form of (anonymous) transcripts and codes - be viewed freely accessible - if any. The release of the original AV data for a scientific re-use is linked to a registration by specifying a reasoned research interest in order to protect the privacy rights of the observed or interviewed people.
EOL’s platforms and instruments collect large and often unique data sets that must be validated, archived and made available to the research community. The goal of EOL data services is to advance science through delivering high-quality project data and metadata in ways that are as transparent, secure, and easily accessible as possible - today and into the future. By adhering to accepted standards in data formats and data services, EOL provides infrastructure to facilitate discovery and direct access to data and software from state-of-the-art commercial and locally-developed applications. EOL’s data services are committed to the highest standard of data stewardship from collection to validation to archival.
The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union. Our task is to provide sound, independent information on the environment. We are a major information source for those involved in developing, adopting, implementing and evaluating environmental policy, and also the general public. Currently, the EEA has 33 member countries. EEA's mandate is: To help the Community and member countries make informed decisions about improving the environment, integrating environmental considerations into economic policies and moving towards sustainability To coordinate the European environment information and observation network (Eionet)
The primary focus of the Upper Ocean Processes Group is the study of physical processes in the upper ocean and at the air-sea interface using moored surface buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors. UOP Project Map The Upper Ocean Processes Group provides technical support to upper ocean and air-sea interface science programs. Deep-ocean and shallow-water moored surface buoy arrays are designed, fabricated, instrumented, tested, and deployed at sea for periods of up to one year
SeaBASS, the publicly shared archive of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data maintained by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG). High quality in situ measurements are prerequisite for satellite data product validation, algorithm development, and many climate-related inquiries. As such, the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) maintains a local repository of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data to support their regular scientific analyses. The SeaWiFS Project originally developed this system, SeaBASS, to catalog radiometric and phytoplankton pigment data used their calibration and validation activities. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, SeaBASS was expanded with oceanographic and atmospheric data collected by participants in the SIMBIOS Program, under NASA Research Announcements NRA-96 and NRA-99, which has aided considerably in minimizing spatial bias and maximizing data acquisition rates. Archived data include measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties, phytoplankton pigment concentrations, and other related oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as water temperature, salinity, stimulated fluorescence, and aerosol optical thickness. Data are collected using a number of different instrument packages, such as profilers, buoys, and hand-held instruments, and manufacturers on a variety of platforms, including ships and moorings.
The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite measures the ozone layer in our upper atmosphere—tracking the status of global ozone distributions, including the ‘ozone hole.’ It also monitors ozone levels in the troposphere, the lowest layer of our atmosphere. OMPS extends out 40-year long record ozone layer measurements while also providing improved vertical resolution compared to previous operational instruments. Closer to the ground, OMPS’s measurements of harmful ozone improve air quality monitoring and when combined with cloud predictions; help to create the Ultraviolet Index, a guide to safe levels of sunlight exposure. OMPS has two sensors, both new designs, composed of three advanced hyperspectralimaging spectrometers.The three spectrometers: a downward-looking nadir mapper, nadir profiler and limb profiler. The entire OMPS suite currently fly on board the Suomi NPP spacecraft and are scheduled to fly on the JPSS-2 satellite mission. NASA will provide the OMPS-Limb profiler.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
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The Coriolis Data Centre handles operational oceanography measurements made in situ, complementing the measurement of the ocean surface made using instruments aboard satellites. This work is realised through the establishment of permanent networks with data collected by ships or autonomous systems that are either fixed or drifting. This data can be used to construct a snapshot of water mass structure and current intensity.
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Science Data Centre (SDC) is a service launched by Leibniz-Institute for Solarphysics (KIS). Its primary purpose is to provide a common platform for the solar community to store, access, analyse and archive solar data produced by a heterogeneous group of scientific instruments. ChroTel is a telescope to observe the solar chromosphere across the full disk. ChroTel observes the Sun pseudo-simultaneously in three channels at Ca II K, H-alpha and Helium 1083. GRIS is the spectrograph developed by IAC, installed in the German solar telescope GREGOR of the Teide Observatory. LARS is an Absolute Reference Spectrograph. It performs fiber-coupled solar observations with the high-resolution Echelle Spectrograph of the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at the Observatorio del Teide on Tenerife.
The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth’s atmosphere from three broadband channels. CERES products include both solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation from the top of the atmosphere to the Earth's surface.
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Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-features/). This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
The Keck Observatory Archive (KOA)is a collaboration between the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO). This collaboration is founded by the NASA. KOA has been archiving data from the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) since August 2004 and data acquired with the Near InfraRed echelle SPECtrograph (NIRSPEC) since May 2010. The archived data extend back to 1994 for HIRES and 1999 for NIRSPEC. The W. M. Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) ingests and curates data from the following instruments: DEIMOS, ESI, HIRES, KI, LRIS, MOSFIRE, NIRC2, and NIRSPEC.
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The Résif-EPOS Seismic data repository hosts and distributes seismological data from permanent and temporary seismic networks operated all over the world by French research institutions and international partners, to support research on source processes and imaging of the Earth's interior at all scales. Résif-EPOS (French seismologic and geodetic network) is a French national equipment for the observation and understanding of the solid Earth.
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>>>!!!<<<VENUS coastal network, is now part of the Ocean Networks Canada Observatory>>>!!!<<< VENUS is a cabled undersea laboratory for ocean researchers and explorers. VENUS delivers real time information from seafloor instruments via fibre optic cables to the University of Victoria, BC. You can see ocean data live, recent and archived as well as learn more about on-going research
UNAVCO promotes research by providing access to data that our community of geodetic scientists uses for quantifying the motions of rock, ice and water that are monitored by a variety of sensor types at or near the Earth's surface. After processing, these data enable millimeter-scale surface motion detection and monitoring at discrete points, and high-resolution strain imagery over areas of tens of square meters to hundreds of square kilometers. The data types include GPS/GNSS, imaging data such as from SAR and TLS, strain and seismic borehole data, and meteorological data. Most of these can be accessed via web services. In addition, GPS/GNSS datasets, TLS datasets, and InSAR products are assigned digital object identifiers.
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
SHARE - Stations at High Altitude for Research on the Environment - is an integrated Project for environmental monitoring and research in the mountain areas of Europe, Asia, Africa and South America responding to the call for improving environmental research and policies for adaptation to the effects of climate changes, as requested by International and Intergovernmental institutions.
On February 24, 2000, Terra began collecting what will ultimately become a new, 15-year global data set on which to base scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Together with the entire fleet of EOS spacecraft, Terra is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change. TERRA's data collection instruments include: Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)
The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) is a publicly accessible earth science data repository created to curate, publicly serve (publish), and archive digital data and information from biological, chemical and biogeochemical research conducted in coastal, marine, great lakes and laboratory environments. The BCO-DMO repository works closely with investigators funded through the NSF OCE Division’s Biological and Chemical Sections and the Division of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems. The office provides services that span the full data life cycle, from data management planning support and DOI creation, to archive with appropriate national facilities.