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Found 13 result(s)
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) is a catalogue/compendium of inherited disorders, other (single-locus) traits, and genes in 218 animal species (other than human and mouse and rats, which have their own resources) authored by Professor Frank Nicholas of the University of Sydney, Australia, with help from many people over the years. OMIA information is stored in a database that contains textual information and references, as well as links to relevant PubMed and Gene records at the NCBI, and to OMIM and Ensembl.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
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Background: Many studies have been conducted to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in dairy cattle. However, these studies are diverse in terms of their differing resource populations, marker maps, phenotypes, etc, and one of the challenges is to be able to synthesise this diverse information. This web page has been constructed to provide an accessible database of studies, providing a summary of each study, facilitating an easier comparison across studies. However, it also highlights the need for uniform reporting of results of studies, to facilitate more direct comparisons being made. Description: Studies recorded in this database include complete and partial genome scans, single chromosome scans, as well as fine mapping studies, and contain all known reports that were published in peer-reviewed journals and readily available conference proceedings, initially up to April 2005. However, this data base is being added to, as indicated by the last web update. Note that some duplication of results will occur, in that there may be a number of reports on the same resource population, but utilising different marker densities or different statistical methodologies. The traits recorded in this map are milk yield, milk composition (protein yield, protein %, fat yield, fat %), and somatic cell score (SCS).
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The TERN Data Discovery Portal (TDDP) is a gateway to search and access all the datasets published by Australian Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. In the TERN data discovery portal, users can conduct textual and graphical searches on the metadata catalogue using a web interface with temporal, spatial, and eco science related controlled vocabulary keywords. Requests to download data discovered through the portal are serviced by an individual TERN facility hosting the data. Downloading, using and sharing data will be subjected to the TERN data licensing framework (http://tern.org.au/datalicence).
As with most biomedical databases, the first step is to identify relevant data from the research community. The Monarch Initiative is focused primarily on phenotype-related resources. We bring in data associated with those phenotypes so that our users can begin to make connections among other biological entities of interest. We import data from a variety of data sources. With many resources integrated into a single database, we can join across the various data sources to produce integrated views. We have started with the big players including ClinVar and OMIM, but are equally interested in boutique databases. You can learn more about the sources of data that populate our system from our data sources page https://monarchinitiative.org/about/sources.
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TERN's AEKOS data portal is the original gateway to Australian ecology data. It is a ‘data and research methods’ data portal for Australia’s land-dwelling plants, animals and their environments. The primary focus of data content is raw co-located ‘species and environment’ ecological survey data that has been collected at the ‘plot’ level to describe biodiversity, its patterns and ecological processes. It is openly accessible with standard discovery metadata and user-oriented, contextual metadata critical for data reuse. Our services support the ecosystem science community, land managers and governments seeking to publish under COPE publishing ethics and the FAIR data publishing principles. AEKOS is registered with Thomson & Reuters Data Citation Index and is a recommended repository of Nature Publishing’s Scientific Data. There are currently 97,037 sites covering mostly plant biodiversity and co-located environmental data of Australia. The AEKOS initiative is supported by TERN (tern.org.au), hosted by The University of Adelaide and funded by the Australian Government’s National Research Infrastructure for Australia.
REFOLD has merged to REFOLDdb. REFOLDdb is a unique database for the life sciences research community, providing annotated information for designing new refolding protocols and customizing existing methodologies. We envisage that this resource will find wide utility across broad disciplines that rely on the production of pure, active, recombinant proteins. Furthermore, the database also provides a useful overview of the recent trends and statistics in refolding technology development.We based our resource on the existing REFOLD database, which has not been updated since 2009. We redesigned the data format to be more concise, allowing consistent representations among data entries compared with the original REFOLD database. The remodeled data architecture enhances the search efficiency and improves the sustainability of the database. After an exhaustive literature search we added experimental refolding protocols from reports published 2009 to early 2017. In addition to this new data, we fully converted and integrated existing REFOLD data into our new resource.
The Australian Drosophila Ecology and Evolution Resource (ADEER) from the Hoffmann lab and other contributors is a nationally significant life science collection. The Drosophila Clinal Data Collection contains data on populations along the eastern coast of Australia. It remains an excellent resource for understanding past and future evolutionary responses to climate change. The Drosophila Genomic Data Collection hosts Drosophila genomes sequenced as part of the Genomic Basis for Adaptation to Climate Change Project. 23 genomes have been sequenced as part of this project. Currently assemblies and annotations are available for Drosophila birchii, D. bunnanda, D. hydei, and D. repleta. The Drosophila Species Distribution Data Collection contains distribution data of nine drosophilid species that have been collected in Australia by the Hoffmann lab and other research groups between 1924 and 2005. More than 300 drosophilid species have been identified in the tropical and temperate forests located on the east coast of Australia. Many species are restricted to the tropics, a few are temperate specialists, and some have broad distributions across climatic regions. Their varied distribution along the tropical - temperate cline provide a powerful tool for studying climate adaptation and species distribution limits.
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Stemformatics is a collaboration between the stem cell and bioinformatics community. We were motivated by the plethora of exciting cell models in the public and private domains, and the realisation that for many biologists these were mostly inaccessible. We wanted a fast way to find and visualise interesting genes in these exemplar stem cell datasets. We'd like you to explore. You'll find data from leading stem cell laboratories in a format that is easy to search, easy to visualise and easy to export.
InnateDB is a publicly available database of the genes, proteins, experimentally-verified interactions and signaling pathways involved in the innate immune response of humans, mice and bovines to microbial infection. The database captures an improved coverage of the innate immunity interactome by integrating known interactions and pathways from major public databases together with manually-curated data into a centralised resource. The database can be mined as a knowledgebase or used with our integrated bioinformatics and visualization tools for the systems level analysis of the innate immune response.
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Store.Synchrotron is a fully functional, cloud computing based solution to raw X-ray data archival and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, largest stand-alone piece of scientific infrastructure in the southern hemisphere. Store.Synchrotron represents the logical extension of a long-standing effort in the macromolecular crystallography community to ensure that satisfactory evidence is provided to support the interpretation of structural experiments.