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Found 114 result(s)
CLARIN is a European Research Infrastructure for the Humanities and Social Sciences, focusing on language resources (data and tools). It is being implemented and constantly improved at leading institutions in a large and growing number of European countries, aiming at improving Europe's multi-linguality competence. CLARIN provides several services, such as access to language data and tools to analyze data, and offers to deposit research data, as well as direct access to knowledge about relevant topics in relation to (research on and with) language resources. The main tool is the 'Virtual Language Observatory' providing metadata and access to the different national CLARIN centers and their data.
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PARADISEC (the Pacific And Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) offers a facility for digital conservation and access to endangered materials from all over the world. Our research group has developed models to ensure that the archive can provide access to interested communities, and conforms with emerging international standards for digital archiving. We have established a framework for accessioning, cataloguing and digitising audio, text and visual material, and preserving digital copies. The primary focus of this initial stage is safe preservation of material that would otherwise be lost, especially field tapes from the 1950s and 1960s.
OLAC, the Open Language Archives Community, is an international partnership of institutions and individuals who are creating a worldwide virtual library of language resources by: (i) developing consensus on best current practice for the digital archiving of language resources, and (ii) developing a network of interoperating repositories and services for housing and accessing such resources.
The Buckeye Corpus of conversational speech contains high-quality recordings from 40 speakers in Columbus OH conversing freely with an interviewer. The speech has been orthographically transcribed and phonetically labeled. The audio and text files, together with time-aligned phonetic labels, are stored in a format for use with speech analysis software (Xwaves and Wavesurfer). Software for searching the transcription files is currently being written.
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The Universitat de Barcelona Digital Repository is an institutional resource containing open-access digital versions of publications related to the teaching, research and institutional activities of the UB's teaching staff and other members of the university community, including research data.
The Eurac Research CLARIN Centre (ERCC) is a dedicated repository for language data. It is hosted by the Institute for Applied Linguistics (IAL) at Eurac Research, a private research centre based in Bolzano, South Tyrol. The Centre is part of the Europe-wide CLARIN infrastructure, which means that it follows well-defined international standards for (meta)data and procedures and is well-embedded in the wider European Linguistics infrastructure. The repository hosts data collected at the IAL, but is also open for data deposits from external collaborators.
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The KiezDeutsch-Korpus (KiDKo) has been developed by project B6 (PI: Heike Wiese) of the collaborative research centre Information Structure (SFB 632) at the University of Potsdam from 2008 to 2015. KiDKo is a multi-modal digital corpus of spontaneous discourse data from informal, oral peer group situations in multi- and monoethnic speech communities. KiDKo contains audio data from self-recordings, with aligned transcriptions (i.e., at every point in a transcript, one can access the corresponding area in the audio file). The corpus provides parts-of-speech tags as well as an orthographically normalised layer (Rehbein & Schalowski 2013). Another annotation level provides information on syntactic chunks and topological fields. There are several complementary corpora: KiDKo/E (Einstellungen - "attitudes") captures spontaneous data from the public discussion on Kiezdeutsch: it assembles emails and readers' comments posted in reaction to media reports on Kiezdeutsch. By doing so, KiDKo/E provides data on language attitudes, language perceptions, and language ideologies, which became apparent in the context of the debate on Kiezdeutsch, but which frequently related to such broader domains as multilingualism, standard language, language prestige, and social class. KiDKo/LL ("Linguistic Landscape") assembles photos of written language productions in public space from the context of Kiezdeutsch, for instance love notes on walls, park benches, and playgrounds, graffiti in house entrances, and scribbled messages on toilet walls. Contains materials in following languages: Spanish, Italian, Greek, Kurdish, Swedish, French, Croatian, Arabic, Turkish. The corpus is available online via the Hamburger Zentrum für Sprachkorpora (HZSK) https://corpora.uni-hamburg.de/secure/annis-switch.php?instance=kidko .
ARCHE (A Resource Centre for the HumanitiEs) is a service aimed at offering stable and persistent hosting as well as dissemination of digital research data and resources for the Austrian humanities community. ARCHE welcomes data from all humanities fields. ARCHE is the successor of the Language Resources Portal (LRP) and acts as Austria’s connection point to the European network of CLARIN Centres for language resources.
The Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR) is a digital repository for preserving multimedia collections of endangered languages from all over the world, making them available for future generations. In ELAR’s collections you can find recordings of every-day conversations, instructions on how to build fish traps or boats, explanations of kinship systems and the use of medicinal plants, and learn about art forms like string figures and sand drawings. ELAR’s collections are unique records of local knowledge systems encoded in their languages, described by the holders of the knowledge themselves.
CHILDES is the child language component of the TalkBank system. TalkBank is a system for sharing and studying conversational interactions.
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The Diccionario del Español Medieval electrónico (DEMel) provides a lemmatised and semantically pre-structured electronic data archive on medieval Spanish. The basis of the digitised data collection is the material archived in card indexes of the Diccionario del Español Medieval (DEM), which was discontinued at the end of 2007 for financial reasons. The DEM covers the history of the development of Spanish vocabulary between the 10th and the beginning of the 15th century on the basis of far more than 600 literary and non-literary works or collections of texts and documents.
Currently, the IMS repository focuses on resources provided by the Institute for Natural Language Processing in Stuttgart (IMS) and other CLARIN-D related institutions such as the local Collaborative Research Centre 732 (SFB 732) as well as institutions and/or organizations that belong to the CLARIN-D extended scientific community. Comprehensive guidelines and workflows for submission by external contributors are being compiled based on the experiences in archiving such in-house resources.
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The World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS) is a large database of structural (phonological, grammatical, lexical) properties of languages gathered from descriptive materials (such as reference grammars) by a team of 55 authors (many of them the leading authorities on the subject).
Competence Centre IULA-UPF-CC CLARIN manages, disseminates and facilitates this catalogue, which provides access to reference information on the use of language technology projects and studies in different disciplines, especially with regard to Humanities and Social Sciences. The Catalog relates information that is organized by Áreas, (disciplines and research topics), Projects (of research that use or have used language technologies), Tasks (that make the tools), Tools (of language technology), Documentation (articles regarding the tools and how they are used) and resources such as Corpora (collections of annotated texts) and Lexica (collections of words for different uses).
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
Cocoon "COllections de COrpus Oraux Numériques" is a technical platform that accompanies the oral resource producers, create, organize and archive their corpus; a corpus can consist of records (usually audio) possibly accompanied by annotations of these records. The resources registered are first cataloged and stored while, and then, secondly archived in the archive of the TGIR Huma-Num. The author and his institution are responsible for filings and may benefit from a restricted and secure access to their data for a defined period, if the content of the information is considered sensitive. The COCOON platform is jointly operated by two joint research units: Laboratoire de Langues et civilisations à tradition orale (LACITO - UMR7107 - Université Paris3 / INALCO / CNRS) and Laboratoire Ligérien de Linguistique (LLL - UMR7270 - Universités d'Orléans et de Tours, BnF, CNRS).
Språkbanken was established in 1975 as a national center located in the Faculty of Arts, University of Gothenburg. Allén's groundbreaking corpus linguistic research resulted in the creation of one of the first large electronic text corpora in another language than English, with one million words of newspaper text. The task of Språkbanken is to collect, develop, and store (Swedish) text corpora, and to make linguistic data extracted from the corpora available to researchers and to the public.
Lithuania became a full member of CLARIN ERIC in January of 2015 and soon CLARIN-LT consortium was founded by three partner universities: Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas Technology University and Vilnius University. The main goal of the consortium is to become a CLARIN B centre, which will be able to serve language users in Lithuania and Europe for storing and accessing language resources.
This website constitutes a repository of tools and resources for researchers and teachers that are interested in second language speech acquisition and pronunciation teaching in diverse educational contexts. If you are a RESEARCHER in the field of second language acquisition (SLA), here you will find a wide range of validated tools that may be useful for your individual differences, SLA or L2 speech studies. If you are a passionate second language pronunciation TEACHER interested in communicative methods, here you will be able to download several carefully designed explicit instruction, communicative form-focused activities and pronunciation-based tasks that are ready to be used in your classroom
LAUDATIO has developed an open access research data repository for historical corpora. For the access and (re-)use of historical corpora, the LAUDATIO repository uses a flexible and appropriate documentation schema with a subset of TEI customized by TEI ODD. The extensive metadata schema contains information about the preparation and checking methods applied to the data, tools, formats and annotation guidelines used in the project, as well as bibliographic metadata, and information on the research context (e.g. the research project). To provide complex and comprehensive search in the annotation data, the search and visualization tool ANNIS is integrated in the LAUDATIO-Repository.
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The Australian National Corpus collates and provides access to assorted examples of Australian English text, transcriptions, audio and audio-visual materials. Text analysis tools are embedded in the interface allowing analysis and downloads in *.CSV format.
MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements. Additional access: https://lsa.umich.edu/eli/language-resources/micase-micusp.html
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.