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Found 27 result(s)
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
Satellite-tracked drifting buoys ("drifters") collect measurements of upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) around the world as part of the Global Drifter Program. Drifter locations are estimated from 16-20 satellite fixes per day, per drifter. The Drifter Data Assembly Center (DAC) at NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) assembles these raw data, applies quality control procedures, and interpolates them via kriging to regular six-hour intervals. The raw observations and processed data are archived at AOML and at the Marine Environmental Data Services (MEDS) in Canada. Two types of data are available: "metadata" contains deployment location and time, time of drogue (sea anchor) loss, date of final transmission, etc. for each drifter. "Interpolated data" contains the quality-controlled, interpolated drifter observations.
The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project is a research and development project focusing on global air-sea heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes. The project is committed to produce high-quality, long-term, global ocean surface forcing datasets from the late 1950s to the present to serve the needs of the ocean and climate communities on the characterization, attribution, modeling, and understanding of variability and long-term change in the atmosphere and the oceans. - Links überprüft 14.6.2017 Re
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LITTERBASE summarises results from 2,046 scientific studies in understandable global maps and figures and opens scientific knowledge on marine litter to the public. In LITTERBASE, we compile information from 2,046 scientific publications on marine litter in a comprehensive data base. This forms the basis of continuously updated maps and figures for policy makers, authorities, scientists, media and the general public on the global amount, distribution and composition of marine litter and its impacts on aquatic life. The portal conveys a broad, fact-based understanding of this environmental problem.
The Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) provides regular and systematic reference information on the physical and biogeochemical state, variability and dynamics of the ocean and marine ecosystems for the global ocean and the European regional seas. The observations and forecasts produced by the service support all marine applications, including: Marine safety; Marine resources; Coastal and marine environment; Weather, seasonal forecasting and climate. For instance, the provision of data on currents, winds and sea ice help to improve ship routing services, offshore operations or search and rescue operations, thus contributing to marine safety. The service also contributes to the protection and the sustainable management of living marine resources in particular for aquaculture, sustainable fisheries management or regional fishery organisations decision-making process. Physical and marine biogeochemical components are useful for water quality monitoring and pollution control. Sea level rise is a key indicator of climate change and helps to assess coastal erosion. Sea surface temperature elevation has direct consequences on marine ecosystems and appearance of tropical cyclones. As a result of this, the service supports a wide range of coastal and marine environment applications. Many of the data delivered by the service (e.g. temperature, salinity, sea level, currents, wind and sea ice) also play a crucial role in the domain of weather, climate and seasonal forecasting.
The primary focus of the Upper Ocean Processes Group is the study of physical processes in the upper ocean and at the air-sea interface using moored surface buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors. UOP Project Map The Upper Ocean Processes Group provides technical support to upper ocean and air-sea interface science programs. Deep-ocean and shallow-water moored surface buoy arrays are designed, fabricated, instrumented, tested, and deployed at sea for periods of up to one year
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) provides and collects multi-year continuous data on atmospheric conditions in the Arctic. International Polar Year (IPY) maintains partnerships with Arctic observatories from Sweden, Canada, United States, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland. Each IASOA observatory features extensive suites of co-located, research grade active, passive and in-situ observing systems. Atmospheric characteristics of interest are standard meteorology, greenhouse gases, atmospheric radiation, clouds, pollutants, chemistry, aerosols, and surface energy balances. IASOA operates within boundaries defined by (1) the Arctic (2) the atmosphere (3) the ground-based vantage point (4) data generated by instrument systems and (5) multi-year continuous records to support climate studies.
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AVISO stands for "Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data". Here, you will find data, articles, news and tools to help you discover or improve your skills in the altimetry domain through four key themes: ocean, coast, hydrology and ice. Altimetry is a technique for measuring height. Satellite altimetry measures the time taken by a radar pulse to travel from the satellite antenna to the surface and back to the satellite receiver. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield sea-surface heights.
MEMENTO aims to become a valuable tool for identifying regions of the world ocean that should be targeted in future work to improve the quality of air-sea flux estimates.
Climate Data Record (CDR) is a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency and continuity to determine climate variability and change. The fundamental CDRs include sensor data, such as calibrated radiances and brightness temperatures, that scientists have improved and quality-controlled along with the data used to calibrate them. The thematic CDRs include geophysical variables derived from the fundamental CDRs, such as sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration, and they are specific to various disciplines.
Seafloor Sediments Data Collection is a collection of more than 14,000 archived marine geological samples recovered from the seafloor. The inventory includes long, stratified sediment cores, as well as rock dredges, surface grabs, and samples collected by the submersible Alvin.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
ERDDAP is a data server that gives you a simple, consistent way to download subsets of gridded and tabular scientific datasets in common file formats and make graphs and maps. This particular ERDDAP installation has oceanographic data (for example, data from satellites and buoys).
ReefTEMPS is a temperature, pressure, salinity and other observables sensor network in coastal area of South, West and South West of Pacific ocean, driven by UMR ENTROPIE. It is an observatory service from the French national research infrastructure ILICO for “coastal environments”. Some of the network’s sensors have been deployed since 1958. Nearly hundred sensors are actually deployed in 14 countries covering an area of more than 8000 km from East to West. The data are acquired at different rates (from 1sec to 30 mn) depending on sensors and sites. They are processed and described using Climate and Forecast Metadata Convention at the end of oceanographic campaigns organized for sensors replacement every 6 months to 2 years.
The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) serves as the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for all Ocean Biology (OB) data produced or collected under NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This website thus serves as the primary data access portal to the NASA OB.DAAC. The links below provide a variety of methods to access the holdings of the OB.DAAC, including visual browsers that enable point-and-click access by data levels and direct access for bulk download. In agreement with partner organizations, some data access requires user registration to enable better tracking of usage metrics.
Seafloor data at these locations include multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution scanning altimetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar, seafloor digital photographs, sample locations, deep-towed magnetic data, and more. Each dataset is geospatially registered and incorporates metadata (e.g., sample geochemistry and time and depth of collection) that can be interactively accessed by the user. The user can control which datasets are shown on a map view of the area and the scale at which the map is viewed. Datasets with resolutions inappropriate for the scale at which they are being viewed are automatically removed from the map.
The TropFlux provides surface heat and momentum flux data of tropical oceans (30°N-30°S) between January 1979 and September 2011. The TropFlux data is produced under a collaboration between Laboratoire d’Océanographie: Expérimentation et Approches Numériques (LOCEAN) from Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL, Paris, France) and National Institute of Oceanography/CSIR (NIO, Goa, India), and supported by Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD, France). TropFlux relies on data provided by the ECMWF Re-Analysis interim (ERA-I) and ISCCP projects. Since 2014 located at Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services.
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>>>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada is now part of Ocean Networks Canada and this website is being phased out. Please visit us on our new website at oceannetworks.ca >>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada, the North-East Pacific Time-series Undersea Networked Experiments, is the world's first regional scale cabled deep ocean observing network. It consists of an 800km network of electro‐optic cable laid on the seabed over the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, off the coast of British Columbia. This tectonic plate serves as an exceptional natural laboratory for ocean observation and experiments. NEPTUNE Canada instruments yield continuous real‐time data and imagery from the ocean surface to beneath the seafloor, and from the coast to the deep sea. They respond to events such as earthquakes, tsunamis, fish migrations, plankton blooms, storms and volcanic eruptions. NEPTUNE Canada offers a unique and exciting approach to ocean science.
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The Coriolis Data Centre handles operational oceanography measurements made in situ, complementing the measurement of the ocean surface made using instruments aboard satellites. This work is realised through the establishment of permanent networks with data collected by ships or autonomous systems that are either fixed or drifting. This data can be used to construct a snapshot of water mass structure and current intensity.
The National Oceanographic Data Center, which includes the National Coastal Data Development Center—have merged into the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). NCEI is responsible for hosting and providing access to one of the most significant archives on Earth, with comprehensive oceanic, atmospheric, and geophysical data. From the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun and from million-year-old sediment records to near real-time satellite images, NCEI is the Nation's leading authority for environmental information. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), which hosts the World Data Service for Oceanography is a national environmental data center operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NCEI are responsible for hosting and providing access to one of the most significant archives on earth, with comprehensive oceanic, atmospheric, and geophysical data. The primary mission of the World Data Service for Oceanography is to ensure that global oceanographic datasets collected at great cost are maintained in a permanent archive that is easily and openly accessible to the world science community and to other users.
The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken.
Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) is the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) core project responsible for understanding how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations. The programme was initiated by SCOR and the IOC of UNESCO in 1991, to understand how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations comprising a major component of oceanic ecosystems. The aim of GLOBEC is to advance our understanding of the structure and functioning of the global ocean ecosystem, its major subsystems, and its response to physical forcing so that a capability can be developed to forecast the responses of the marine ecosystem to global change. U.S. GLOBEC Programm includes the Georges Bank / NW Atlantic Programm, the Northeast Pacific Programm and the Southern Ocean Program.