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Found 19 result(s)
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PsychArchives is a disciplinary repository preserving a variety of digital research objects (DROs), with 21 different publication types (preprints, primary, and secondary publications), research data, tests, preregistrations, multimedia and code. We provide easy and free access to DROs according to the FAIR principles, which implies the commitment to ensure that research and research data are findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable.
cIRcle is an open access digital repository for published and unpublished material created by the UBC community and its partners. In BIRS there are thousands of mathematics videos, which are primary research data. Our repository is the largest source of mathematics data with more than 10TB of primary research by the best mathematicians in the world, coming from more than 600 institutions.
Catena, the Digital Archive of Historic Gardens and Landscapes, is a collection of historic and contemporary images, including plans, engravings, and photographs, intended to support research and teaching in the fields of garden history and landscape studies. Created through the collaborative efforts of landscape historians and institutions, the initial offering of images is focused on the Villas as a Landscape Type.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
The UCI Machine Learning Repository is a collection of databases, domain theories, and data generators that are used by the machine learning community for the empirical analysis of machine learning algorithms. It is used by students, educators, and researchers all over the world as a primary source of machine learning data sets. As an indication of the impact of the archive, it has been cited over 1000 times.
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Figshare has been chosen as the University of Adelaide's official data and digital object repository with unlimited local storage. All current staff and HDR students can access and publish research data and digital objects on the University of Adelaide's Figshare site. Because Figshare is cloud-based, you can access it anywhere and at any time.
This unique resource covers the entire field of astronomy and astrophysics and this online version includes the full text of over 2,750 articles, plus sophisticated search and retrieval functionality, links to the primary literature, and is frequently updated with new material. An active editorial team, headed by the Encyclopedia's editor-in-chief, Paul Murdin, oversees the continual commissioning, reviewing and loading of new and revised content.In a unique collaboration, Nature Publishing Group and Institute of Physics Publishing published the most extensive and comprehensive reference work in astronomy and astrophysics in both print and online formats. First published as a four volume print edition in 2001, the initial Web version went live in 2002, and contained the original print material and was rapidly supplemented with numerous updates and newly commissioned material. Since July 2006 the Encyclopedia is published solely by Taylor & Francis.
The Paleobiology Database (PaleoBioDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.
The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) is a public database which contains frequency information of several immune genes such as Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related (MIC) genes, and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) provides a central source, freely available to all, for the storage of allele frequencies from different polymorphic areas in the Human Genome. Users can contribute the results of their work into one common database and can perform database searches on information already available. We have currently collected data in allele, haplotype and genotype format. However, the success of this website will depend on you to contribute your data.
The African Development Bank Group (AfDB) is committed to supporting statistical development in Africa as a sound basis for designing and managing effective development policies for reducing poverty on the continent. Reliable and timely data is critical to setting goals and targets as well as evaluating project impact. Reliable data constitutes the single most convincing way of getting the people involved in what their leaders and institutions are doing. It also helps them to get involved in the development process, thus giving them a sense of ownership of the entire development process. The AfDB has a large team of researchers who focus on the production of statistical data on economic and social situations. The data produced by the institution’s statistics department constitutes the background information in the Bank’s flagship development publications. Besides its own publication, the AfDB also finances studies in collaboration with its partners. The Statistics Department aims to stand as the primary source of relevant, reliable and timely data on African development processes, starting with the data generated from its current management of the Africa component of the International Comparison Program (ICP-Africa). The Department discharges its responsibilities through two divisions: The Economic and Social Statistics Division (ESTA1); The Statistical Capacity Building Division (ESTA2)
The range of CIRAD's research has given rise to numerous datasets and databases associating various types of data: primary (collected), secondary (analysed, aggregated, used for scientific articles, etc), qualitative and quantitative. These "collections" of research data are used for comparisons, to study processes and analyse change. They include: genetics and genomics data, data generated by trials and measurements (using laboratory instruments), data generated by modelling (interpolations, predictive models), long-term observation data (remote sensing, observatories, etc), data from surveys, cohorts, interviews with players.
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The objective of this project is to generate the most comprehensive description of human chromosome 7 to facilitate biological discovery, disease gene research and medical genetic applications. In our vision, the DNA sequence of chromosome 7 should be made available in a user-friendly manner having every biological and medically relevant feature annotated along its length. We have established this website and database as one step towards this goal. In addition to being a primary data source we foresee this site serving as a "weighing station" for testing community ideas and information to produce highly curated data to be submitted to other databases such as NCBI, Ensembl, and UCSC. Therefore, any useful data submitted to us will be curated and shown in this database.
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, documents or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. Direct access to the ETH Data Archive is intended only for customers who need to deposit software source code within the framework of ETH transfer Software Registration. An automated connection to the ETH Data Archive in the background ensures the medium to long-term preservation of all publications and research data.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.