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Found 68 result(s)
World Data Center for Oceanography serves to store and provide to users data on physical, chemical and dynamical parameters of the global ocean as well as oceanography-related papers and publications, which are either came from other countries through the international exchange or provided to the international exchange by organizations of the Russian Federation
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<<<!!!<<< There are no more data available. >>>!!!>>> HalOcAt brings together global oceanic and atmospheric data of mainly short-lived brominated and iodinated trace gases.
The mission of the GDC is to curate and provide access to oceanographic data, especially from Scripps expeditions, making them accessible for scientific and educational use worldwide. Originally launched by Bill Menard, the GDC has been in operation for more than 40 years. While many historic physical artifacts are carefully preserved, the current emphasis is on digital archiving, in coordination with other national and international programs.
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Data are the key to successful scientific work. A sophisticated data management will guarantee the long-term availability of observational data and metadata, and will allow for an easy data search and retrieval, to supplement the international data exchange and to provide data products for scientific, political, industrial and public stakeholders.
MEMENTO aims to become a valuable tool for identifying regions of the world ocean that should be targeted in future work to improve the quality of air-sea flux estimates.
The NOAA/ESRL Physical Sciences Division (PSD) conducts weather and climate research to observe and understand Earth's physical environment, and to improve weather and climate predictions on global-to-local scales. PSD archives a wide range of data ranging from gridded climate datasets extending hundreds of years to real-time wind profiler data at a single location. The data or products derived from this data, organized by type, are available to scientists and the general public .
The primary focus of the Upper Ocean Processes Group is the study of physical processes in the upper ocean and at the air-sea interface using moored surface buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors. UOP Project Map The Upper Ocean Processes Group provides technical support to upper ocean and air-sea interface science programs. Deep-ocean and shallow-water moored surface buoy arrays are designed, fabricated, instrumented, tested, and deployed at sea for periods of up to one year
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
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The data page makes the data that PCIC collects and produces publicly available with an open license. The page presently provides access to BC Station Data, High-Resolution Climatology, Downscaled Climate Scenarios and VIC Hydrologic Model Output and Extreme Indices calculated from CMIP5.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
The Seamount Catalog is a digital archive for bathymetric seamount maps from all the oceans that can be viewed and downloaded in various formats. This catalog contains morphological data, sample information, related grid and multibeam data files, as well as user-contributed files that all can be downloaded.
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Hakai Data stores and shares research information associated with Hakai Institute. The Hakai Institute is a scientific research institution that advances long-term research at remote locations on the coastal margin of British Columbia, Canada. Hakai Data Systems: Data Catalogue, Sensor Network, Geospatial Data, Weather Stations and Webcams, ERDDAP Data Server
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GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel is one of the leading marine science institutions in Europe. GEOMAR investigates the chemical, physical, biological, and geological processes in the oceans, as well as their interactions with the seafloor and the atmosphere. OceanRep is an open access digital collection containing the research output of GEOMAR staff and students. Included are journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, theses and more, - with fulltext, if available. Research data are linked to the publications entries.
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
PISCO researchers collect biological, chemical, and physical data about ocean ecosystems in the nearshore portions of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. Data are archived and used to create summaries and graphics, in order to ensure that the data can be used and understood by a diverse audience of managers, policy makers, scientists and the general public.
Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) is the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) core project responsible for understanding how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations. The programme was initiated by SCOR and the IOC of UNESCO in 1991, to understand how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations comprising a major component of oceanic ecosystems. The aim of GLOBEC is to advance our understanding of the structure and functioning of the global ocean ecosystem, its major subsystems, and its response to physical forcing so that a capability can be developed to forecast the responses of the marine ecosystem to global change. U.S. GLOBEC Programm includes the Georges Bank / NW Atlantic Programm, the Northeast Pacific Programm and the Southern Ocean Program.
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The CSIRO National Collections and Marine Infrastructure (NCMI) Information and Data Centre has managed marine data for Australia's government research organisation for over 30 years. They have an enduring archive of marine and climate research data, and regularly publish data (including physical, chemical, bathymetric and biological data) collected on board RV Investigator as part of the Marine National Facility. Data from the MNF is freely and publicly available.
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The main objective of the Bolin Centre Database is to ensure the preservation, interoperability and open access of climate research data for members of the Bolin Centre for Climate Research. The Bolin Centre Database also provides expert advice and guidance on data management. The Bolin Centre itself is a multi-disciplinary consortium in Sweden that conducts research and graduate education related to the Earth´s climate, in collaboration between Stockholm University, The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
The Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) provides regular and systematic reference information on the physical and biogeochemical state, variability and dynamics of the ocean and marine ecosystems for the global ocean and the European regional seas. The observations and forecasts produced by the service support all marine applications, including: Marine safety; Marine resources; Coastal and marine environment; Weather, seasonal forecasting and climate. For instance, the provision of data on currents, winds and sea ice help to improve ship routing services, offshore operations or search and rescue operations, thus contributing to marine safety. The service also contributes to the protection and the sustainable management of living marine resources in particular for aquaculture, sustainable fisheries management or regional fishery organisations decision-making process. Physical and marine biogeochemical components are useful for water quality monitoring and pollution control. Sea level rise is a key indicator of climate change and helps to assess coastal erosion. Sea surface temperature elevation has direct consequences on marine ecosystems and appearance of tropical cyclones. As a result of this, the service supports a wide range of coastal and marine environment applications. Many of the data delivered by the service (e.g. temperature, salinity, sea level, currents, wind and sea ice) also play a crucial role in the domain of weather, climate and seasonal forecasting.
The British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) is a national facility for looking after and distributing data concerning the marine environmentWe deal with biological, chemical, physical and geophysical data, and our databases contain measurements of nearly 22,000 different variables. Many of our staff have direct experience of marine data collection and analysis. They work alongside information technology specialists to ensure that data are documented and stored for current and future use.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
Satellite-tracked drifting buoys ("drifters") collect measurements of upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) around the world as part of the Global Drifter Program. Drifter locations are estimated from 16-20 satellite fixes per day, per drifter. The Drifter Data Assembly Center (DAC) at NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) assembles these raw data, applies quality control procedures, and interpolates them via kriging to regular six-hour intervals. The raw observations and processed data are archived at AOML and at the Marine Environmental Data Services (MEDS) in Canada. Two types of data are available: "metadata" contains deployment location and time, time of drogue (sea anchor) loss, date of final transmission, etc. for each drifter. "Interpolated data" contains the quality-controlled, interpolated drifter observations.
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The Ocean Date and Information System provides information on physical, chemical, biological and geological parameters of ocean and coasts on spatial and temporal domains that is vital for both research and operational oceanography. In-situ and remote sensing data are included. The Ocean Information Bank is supported by the data received from Ocean Observing Systems in the Indian Ocean (both the in-situ platforms and satellites) as well as by a chain of Marine Data Centres. Ocean and coastal measurements are available. Data products are accessible through various portals on the site and are largely available by data type (in situ or remote sensing) and then by parameter.