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Found 18 result(s)
<<<!!!<<< The repository is no longer available. >>>!!!>>> The website is archived: https://web.archive.org/web/20161118010932/http:/ourocean.jpl.nasa.gov/ You can follow links to navigate further into archived content from that site.
The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) was developed to support hurricane research. There are three components to TCIS; a global archive of multi-satellite hurricane observations 1999-2010 (Tropical Cyclone Data Archive), North Atlantic Hurricane Watch and ASA Convective Processes Experiment (CPEX) aircraft campaign. Together, data and visualizations from the real time system and data archive can be used to study hurricane process, validate and improve models, and assist in developing new algorithms and data assimilation techniques.
Country
Volare is the repository of the Vorarlberger Landesbibliothek (Vorarlberg State Library). Digital Objects are made end-user-friendly available and they are secured in a long term. Pupils, students, patrimonial researchers but also the general public can use the imagery for various purposes. Volare facilitates access to regional, social and cultural history research. Volare encourages those who rediscover their native place or their holiday desination or just generally want to browse in the past.
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Building upon the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the GPM concept centers on the deployment of a “Core” satellite carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites.
Country
ISDC's online service portal is an access point for all manner of geoscientific geodata, its corresponding metadata, scientific documentation and software tools. The majority of the data and information, the portal currently offers to the public, are global geomonitoring products such as satellite orbit and Earth gravity field data as well as geomagnetic and atmospheric data for the exploration. These products for Earths changing system are provided via state-of-the art retrieval techniques. The projects hosted are: CHAMP, GGP, GRACE, GNSS, GGSP, GGOS, GPS-PDR, ICGEM, TerraSAR-x (TSX-TOR) and TanDEM-X.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
The twin GRACE satellites were launched on March 17, 2002. Since that time, the GRACE Science Data System (SDS) has produced and distributed estimates of the Earth gravity field on an ongoing basis. These estimates, in conjunction with other data and models, have provided observations of terrestrial water storage changes, ice-mass variations, ocean bottom pressure changes and sea-level variations. This portal, together with PODAAC, is responsible for the distribution of the data and documentation for the GRACE project.
Country
HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiemnt. Considering the science and societal issues motivating HyMeX, the programme aims to : improve our understanding of the water cycle, with emphasis on extreme events, by monitoring and modelling the Mediterranean atmosphere-land-ocean coupled system, its variability from the event to the seasonal and interannual scales, and its characteristics over one decade (2010-2020) in the context of global change, assess the social and economic vulnerability to extreme events and adaptation capacity.The multidisciplinary research and the database developed within HyMeX should contribute to: improve observational and modelling systems, especially for coupled systems, better predict extreme events, simulate the long-term water-cycle more accurately, provide guidelines for adaptation measures, especially in the context of global change.
The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) provides global satellite and lunar laser ranging data and their related products to support geodetic and geophysical research activities as well as IERS products important to the maintenance of an accurate International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). The service develops the necessary global standards/specifications and encourages international adherence to its conventions. The ILRS is one of the space geodetic services of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). The ILRS collects, merges, archives and distributes Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) observation data sets of sufficient accuracy to satisfy the objectives of a wide range of scientific, engineering, and operational applications and experimentation.
UNAVCO promotes research by providing access to data that our community of geodetic scientists uses for quantifying the motions of rock, ice and water that are monitored by a variety of sensor types at or near the Earth's surface. After processing, these data enable millimeter-scale surface motion detection and monitoring at discrete points, and high-resolution strain imagery over areas of tens of square meters to hundreds of square kilometers. The data types include GPS/GNSS, imaging data such as from SAR and TLS, strain and seismic borehole data, and meteorological data. Most of these can be accessed via web services. In addition, GPS/GNSS datasets, TLS datasets, and InSAR products are assigned digital object identifiers.
Remote Sensing Systems is a world leader in processing and analyzing microwave data from satellite microwave sensors. We specialize in algorithm development, instrument calibration, ocean product development, and product validation. We have worked with more than 30 satellite microwave radiometer, sounder, and scatterometer instruments over the past 40 years. Currently, we operationally produce satellite retrievals for SSMIS, AMSR2, WindSat, and ASCAT. The geophysical retrievals obtained from these sensors are made available in near-real-time (NRT) to the global scientific community and general public via FTP and this web site.
The IGS global system of satellite tracking stations, Data Centers, and Analysis Centers puts high-quality GPS data and data products on line in near real time to meet the objectives of a wide range of scientific and engineering applications and studies. The IGS collects, archives, and distributes GPS observation data sets of sufficient accuracy to satisfy the objectives of a wide range of applications and experimentation. These data sets are used by the IGS to generate the data products mentioned above which are made available to interested users through the Internet. In particular, the accuracies of IGS products are sufficient for the improvement and extension of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), the monitoring of solid Earth deformations, the monitoring of Earth rotation and variations in the liquid Earth (sea level, ice-sheets, etc.), for scientific satellite orbit determinations, ionosphere monitoring, and recovery of precipitable water vapor measurements.
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
The objective of this database is to stimulate the exchange of information and the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community. However, this community is not exclusive and researchers not directly involved in ChArMEx, but who wish to contribute to the achievements of ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals are welcome to join-in. The database is a depository for all the data collected during the various projects that contribute to ChArMEx coordinated program. It aims at documenting, storing and distributing the data produced or used by the project community. However, it is also intended to host datasets that were produced outside the ChArMEx program but which are meaningful to ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals. Any data owner who wishes to add or link his dataset to ChArMEx database is welcome to contact the database manager in order to get help and support. The ChArMEx database includes past and recent geophysical in situ observations, satellite products and model outputs. The database organizes the data management and provides data services to end-users of ChArMEx data. The database system provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats whenever it is possible. It defines the access rules to the data and details the mutual rights and obligations of data providers and users (see ChArMEx data and publication policy). The database is being developed jointly by : SEDOO, OMP Toulouse , ICARE, Lille and ESPRI, IPSL Paris
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
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The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which flew aboard NASA's Space Shuttle Endeavour during an 11-day mission in 2000, made the first near-global topographical map of Earth, collecting data on nearly 80 percent of Earth's land surfaces. The instrument's design was essentially a modified version of the earlier Shuttle Imaging Radar instruments with a second antenna added to allow for topographic mapping using a technique similar to stereo photography.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.