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Found 19 result(s)
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ISDC's online service portal is an access point for all manner of geoscientific geodata, its corresponding metadata, scientific documentation and software tools. The majority of the data and information, the portal currently offers to the public, are global geomonitoring products such as satellite orbit and Earth gravity field data as well as geomagnetic and atmospheric data for the exploration. These products for Earths changing system are provided via state-of-the art retrieval techniques. The projects hosted are: CHAMP, GGP, GRACE, GNSS, GGSP, GGOS, GPS-PDR, ICGEM, TerraSAR-x (TSX-TOR) and TanDEM-X.
LAMBDA is a part of NASA's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC). LAMBDA is a multi-mission NASA center of expertise for cosmic microwave background radiation research. LAMBDA exists to serve the CMB research community, and the greater cosmological research community.
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CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) is a German small satellite mission for geoscientific and atmospheric research and applications, managed by GFZ. With its highly precise, multifunctional and complementary payload elements (magnetometer, accelerometer, star sensor, GPS receiver, laser retro reflector, ion drift meter) and its orbit characteristics (near polar, low altitude, long duration) CHAMP will generate for the first time simultaneously highly precise gravity and magnetic field measurements over a 5 years period. This will allow to detect besides the spatial variations of both fields also their variability with time. The CHAMP mission had opened a new era in geopotential research and had become a significant contributor to the Decade of Geopotentials. In addition with the radio occultation measurements onboard the spacecraft and the infrastructure developed on ground, CHAMP had become a pilot mission for the pre-operational use of space-borne GPS observations for atmospheric and ionospheric research and applications in weather prediction and space weather monitoring. End of the mission of CHAMP was at September 19 2010, after ten years, two month and four days, after 58277 orbits.
The GOES Space Environment Monitor archive is an important component of the National Space Weather Program --a interagency program to provide timely and reliable space environment observations and forecasts. GOES satellites carry onboard a Space Environment Monitor subsystem that measures X-rays, Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field at the Spacecraft.
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Indian Space Science Programme has the primary goal of promoting and establishing space science and technology programme. The ISSDC is the primary data center to be retrieved from Indian space science missions. This center is responsible for the collections of payload data and related ancillary data for space science missions such as Chandrayaan, Astrosat, Youthsat, etc. The payload data sets can include a range of information including satellite images, X-ray spectrometer readings, and other space observations.
MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (originally known as EOS AM-1) and Aqua (originally known as EOS PM-1) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. Terra MODIS and Aqua MODIS are viewing the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands, or groups of wavelengths (see MODIS Technical Specifications). These data will improve our understanding of global dynamics and processes occurring on the land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. MODIS is playing a vital role in the development of validated, global, interactive Earth system models able to predict global change accurately enough to assist policy makers in making sound decisions concerning the protection of our environment.
CDAAC is responsible for processing the science data received from COSMIC. This data is currently being processed not long after the data is received, i.e. approximately eighty percent of radio occultation profiles are delivered to operational weather centers within 3 hours of observation as well as in a more accurate post-processed mode (within 8 weeks of observation).
The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) was initially developed to provide a central data bank for NASA's Crustal Dynamics Project (CDP). The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data products in a central data bank, to maintain information about the archival of these data, and to disseminate these data and information in a timely manner to NASA investigators and cooperating institutions.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) was launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit on December 18, 1999, aboard TERRA, a NASA satellite orbiting 705 km above the Earth. MOPITT monitors changes in pollution patterns and the effects on Earth’s troposphere. MOPITT uses near-infrared radiation at 2.3 µm and thermal-infrared radiation at 4.7 µm to calculate atmospheric profiles of CO.
The ASTER Project consists of two parts, each having a Japanese and a U.S. component. Mission operations are split between Japan Space Systems (J-spacesystems) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the U.S. J-spacesystems oversees monitoring instrument performance and health, developing the daily schedule command sequence, processing Level 0 data to Level 1, and providing higher level data processing, archiving, and distribution. The JPL ASTER project provides scheduling support for U.S. investigators, calibration and validation of the instrument and data products, coordinating the U.S. Science Team, and maintaining the science algorithms. The joint Japan/U.S. ASTER Science Team has about 40 scientists and researchers. Data access via NASA Reverb, ASTER Japan site, earth explorer, GloVis,GDEx and LP DAAC. See here https://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/data.asp. In Addition data are availabe through the newly implemented ASTER Volcano archive (AVA) https://ava.jpl.nasa.gov/ .
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The company RapidEye AG of Brandenburg brought on 29 August 2008 five satellites into orbit that can be aligned within a day to any point on Earth. The data are interesting for a number of large and small companies for applications from harvest planning to assessment of insurance claims case of natural disasters. Via the Rapid Eye Science Archive (RESA) science users can receive, free of charge, optical image data of the RapidEye satellite fleet. Imagery is allocated based on a proposal to be submitted via the RESA Portal which will be evaluated by independent experts.
The NASA Exoplanet Archive collects and serves public data to support the search for and characterization of extra-solar planets (exoplanets) and their host stars. The data include published light curves, images, spectra and parameters, and time-series data from surveys that aim to discover transiting exoplanets. Tools are provided to work with the data, particularly the display and analysis of transit data sets from Kepler and CoRoT. All data are validated by the Exoplanet Archive science staff and traced to their sources. The Exoplanet Archive is the U.S. data portal for the CoRoT mission.
The IGS global system of satellite tracking stations, Data Centers, and Analysis Centers puts high-quality GPS data and data products on line in near real time to meet the objectives of a wide range of scientific and engineering applications and studies. The IGS collects, archives, and distributes GPS observation data sets of sufficient accuracy to satisfy the objectives of a wide range of applications and experimentation. These data sets are used by the IGS to generate the data products mentioned above which are made available to interested users through the Internet. In particular, the accuracies of IGS products are sufficient for the improvement and extension of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), the monitoring of solid Earth deformations, the monitoring of Earth rotation and variations in the liquid Earth (sea level, ice-sheets, etc.), for scientific satellite orbit determinations, ionosphere monitoring, and recovery of precipitable water vapor measurements.
The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) develops, produces, archives and disseminates satellite-data-based products in support to climate monitoring. The product suite mainly covers parameters related to the energy & water cycle and addresses many of the Essential Climate Variables as defined by GCOS (GCOS 138). The CM SAF produces both Enviromental Data Records and Climate Data Records.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.
On June 1, 1990 the German X-ray observatory ROSAT started its mission to open a new era in X-ray astronomy. Doubtless, this is the most ambitious project realized up to now in the short history of this young astronomical discipline. Equipped with the largest imaging X-ray telescope ever inserted into an earth orbit ROSAT has provided a tremendous amount of new scientific data and insights.
The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) leads in the design and implementation of unique multi-mission and multi-disciplinary data services and software to strategically advance NASA's solar-terrestrial program, to extend our science understanding of the structure, physics and dynamics of the Heliosphere of our Sun and to support the science missions of NASA's Heliophysics Great Observatory. Major SPDF efforts include multi-mission data services such as Heliophysics Data Portal (formerly VSPO), CDAWeb and CDAWeb Inside IDL,and OMNIWeb Plus (including COHOWeb, ATMOWeb, HelioWeb and CGM) , science planning and orbit services such as SSCWeb, data tools such as the CDF software and tools, and a range of other science and technology research efforts. The staff supporting SPDF includes scientists and information technology experts.
The International Center for Global Earth Models collects and distributes historical and actual global gravity field models of the Earth and offers calculation service for derived quantities. In particular the tasks include: collecting and archiving of all existing global gravity field models, web interface for getting access to global gravity field models, web based visualization of the gravity field models their differences and their time variation, web based service for calculating different functionals of the gravity field models, web site for tutorials on spherical harmonics and the theory of the calculation service. As new service since 2016, ICGEM is providing a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for the data set of the model (the coefficients).