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Found 48 result(s)
Here you will find a collection of atomic microstructures that have been built by the atomic modeling community. Feel free to download any of these and use them in your own scientific explorations.The focus of this cyberinfrastructure is to advance the field of atomic-scale modeling of materials by acting as a forum for disseminating new atomistic scale methodologies, educating non-experts and the next generation of computational materials scientists, and serving as a bridge between the atomistic and complementary (electronic structure, mesoscale) modeling communities.
BindingDB is a public, web-accessible database of measured binding affinities, focusing chiefly on the interactions of proteins considered to be candidate drug-targets with ligands that are small, drug-like molecules. BindingDB supports medicinal chemistry and drug discovery via literature awareness and development of structure-activity relations (SAR and QSAR); validation of computational chemistry and molecular modeling approaches such as docking, scoring and free energy methods; chemical biology and chemical genomics; and basic studies of the physical chemistry of molecular recognition. BindingDB also includes a small collection of host-guest binding data of interest to chemists studying supramolecular systems. The data collection derives from a variety of measurement techniques, including enzyme inhibition and kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and radioligand and competition assays. BindingDB includes data extracted from the literature by the BindingDB project, selected PubChem confirmatory BioAssays, and ChEMBL entries for which a well defined protein target ("TARGET_TYPE='PROTEIN'") is provided. Data extracted by BindingDB typically includes more details regarding experimental conditions, etc
The RRUFF Project is creating a complete set of high quality spectral data from well characterized minerals and is developing the technology to share this information with the world. The collected data provides a standard for mineralogists, geoscientists, gemologists and the general public for the identification of minerals both on earth and for planetary exploration.Electron microprobe analysis is used to determine the chemistry of each mineral.
Online materials database (known as PAULING FILE project) with nearly 2 million entries: physical properties, crystal structures, phase diagrams, available via API, ready for modern data-intensive applications. The source of these entries are about 300,000 peer-reviewed publications in materials science, processed during the last 16 years by an international team of PhD editors. The results are presented online with a quick search interface. The basic access is provided for free.
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The UWA Research Repository contains research publications, research datasets and theses created by researchers and postgraduates affiliated with UWA. It is managed by the University Library and provides access to research datasets held at the University of Western Australia. The information about each dataset has been provided by UWA research groups. Dataset metadata is harvested into Research Data Australia (RDA: https://researchdata.ands.org.au/). Language: The user interface language of the research data repository.
The Durham High Energy Physics Database (HEPData), formerly: the Durham HEPData Project, has been built up over the past four decades as a unique open-access repository for scattering data from experimental particle physics. It currently comprises the data points from plots and tables related to several thousand publications including those from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Durham HepData Project has for more than 25 years compiled the Reactions Database containing what can be loosly described as cross sections from HEP scattering experiments. The data comprise total and differential cross sections, structure functions, fragmentation functions, distributions of jet measures, polarisations, etc... from a wide range of interactions. In the new HEPData site (hepdata.net), you can explore new functionalities for data providers and data consumers, as well as the submission interface. HEPData is operated by CERN and IPPP at Durham University and is based on the digital library framework Invenio.
---<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out-dated >>>--- The ONS challenge contains open solubility data, experiments with raw data from different scientists and institutions. It is part of the The Open Notebook Science wiki community, ideally suited for community-wide collaborative research projects involving mathematical modeling and computer simulation work, as it allows researchers to document model development in a step-by-step fashion, then link model prediction to experiments that test the model, and in turn, use feeback from experiments to evolve the model. By making our laboratory notebooks public, the evolutionary process of a model can be followed in its totality by the interested reader. Researchers from laboratories around the world can now follow the progress of our research day-to-day, borrow models at various stages of development, comment or advice on model developments, discuss experiments, ask questions, provide feedback, or otherwise contribute to the progress of science in any manner possible.
Chempound is a new generation repository architecture based on RDF, semantic dictionaries and linked data. It has been developed to hold any type of chemical object expressible in CML and is exemplified by crystallographic experiments and computational chemistry calculations. In both examples, the repository can hold >50k entries which can be searched by SPARQL endpoints and pre-indexing of key fields. The Chempound architecture is general and adaptable to other fields of data-rich science.
nmrshiftdb is a NMR database (web database) for organic structures and their nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectra. It allows for spectrum prediction (13C, 1H and other nuclei) as well as for searching spectra, structures and other properties. Last not least, it features peer-reviewed submission of datasets by its users. The nmrshiftdb2 software is open source, the data is published under an open content license. Please consult the documentation for more detailed information. nmrshiftdb2 is the continuation of the NMRShiftDB project with additional data and bugfixes and changes in the software.
The Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is a national user facility with massive-scale DNA sequencing and analysis capabilities dedicated to advancing genomics for bioenergy and environmental applications. Beyond generating tens of trillions of DNA bases annually, the Institute develops and maintains data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data sets, and to enable an expanding community of users around the world to analyze these data in different contexts over the web. The JGI Genome Portal provides a unified access point to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. A user can find all DOE JGI sequencing projects and their status, search for and download assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes, and interactively explore those genomes and compare them with other sequenced microbes, fungi, plants or metagenomes using specialized systems tailored to each particular class of organisms. Databases: Genome Online Database (GOLD), Integrated Microbial Genomes (IGM), MycoCosm, Phytozome
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
SUNScholarData is an institutional research data repository which can be used for the registration, archival storage, sharing and dissemination of research data produced or collected in relation to research conducted under the auspices of Stellenbosch University. The repository has a public interface which can be used for finding content. It also has private user accounts which can be used by Stellenbosch University users in order to upload, share or publish their research data. In addition to this Stellenbosch University researchers can also use SUNScholarData in order to collaborate with researchers from other institutions whilst working on their research projects. The repository creates a medium through which Stellenbosch University’s research data can be made findable and accessible. It also facilitates the interoperability and re-usability of the university’s research data.
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The repository was esteblished to host, organize, and share materials data. It contains ab initio electronic-structure data from density-functional theory and methods beyond.
The ZINC Database contains commercially available compounds for structure based virtual screening. It currently has about 21 million compounds that can simply be purchased. It is provided in ready-to-dock, 3D formats with molecules represented in biologically relevant forms. It is available in subsets for general screening as well as target-, chemotype- and vendor-focused subsets. ZINC is free for everyone to use and download at the website zinc.docking.org.
The Reciprocal Net is a distributed database used by research crystallographers to store information about molecular structures; much of the data is available to the general public. The Reciprocal Net project is still under development. Currently, there are 18 participating crystallography laboratories online. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and part of the National Science Digital Library. The contents of this collection will come principally from structures contributed by participating crystallography laboratories, thus providing a means for teachers, students, and the general public to connect better with current chemistry research. The Reciprocal Net's emphasis is on obtaining structures of general interest and usefulness to those several classes of digital library users.
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, documents or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. In the following cases, a direct data upload into the ETH Data Archive though, has to be considered: - Upload and registration of software code according to ETH transfer’s requirements for Software Disclosure. - A substantial number of files, have to be regularly submitted for long-term archiving and/or publishing and browser-based upload is not an option: the ETH Data Archive may offer automated data and metadata transfers from source applications (e.g. from a LIMS) via API. - Files for a project on a local computer have to be collected and metadata has to be added before uploading the data to the ETH Data Archive: -- we provide you with the local file editor docuteam packer. Docuteam packer allows to structure, describe, and organise data for an upload into the ETH Data Archive and the depositor decides when submission is due.
Database of mass spectra of known, unknown and provisionally identified substances. MassBank is the first public repository of mass spectral data for sharing them among scientific research community. MassBank data are useful for the chemical identification and structure elucidation of chemical compounds detected by mass spectrometry.
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
The University of Cape Town (UCT) uses Figshare for institutions for their data repository, which was launched in 2017 and is called ZivaHub: Open Data UCT. ZivaHub serves principal investigators at the University of Cape Town who are in need of a repository to store and openly disseminate the data that support their published research findings. The repository service is provided in terms of the UCT Research Data Management Policy. It provides open access to supplementary research data files and links to their respective scholarly publications (e.g. theses, dissertations, papers et al) hosted on other platforms, such as OpenUCT.