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Found 287 result(s)
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
The twin GRACE satellites were launched on March 17, 2002. Since that time, the GRACE Science Data System (SDS) has produced and distributed estimates of the Earth gravity field on an ongoing basis. These estimates, in conjunction with other data and models, have provided observations of terrestrial water storage changes, ice-mass variations, ocean bottom pressure changes and sea-level variations. This portal, together with PODAAC, is responsible for the distribution of the data and documentation for the GRACE project.
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education. PPBio contributes its data to the DataONE network as a member node: https://search.dataone.org/#profile/PPBIO
Welcome to the GALENOS Data Repository. The GALENOS Data Repository provides access to all the research data produced by the Global Alliance for Living Evidence on aNxiety, depressiOn and pSychosis (GALENOS). If you're interested in learning more about GALENOS, please visit the website at https://galenos.org.uk.
The Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI) has published its updated analytical datasets for 2016. The datasets cover socio-economic, education and employment information for individuals and households in AHRI’s population research area in rural northern KwaZulu-Natal. The datasets also include details on the migration patterns of the individuals and households who migrated into and out of the surveillance area as well as data on probable causes of death for individuals who passed away. Data collection for the 2016 individual interviews – which involves a dried blood spot sample being taken – is still in progress, and therefore datasets on HIV status and General Health only go up to 2015 for now. Over the past 16 years researchers have developed an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, economic, clinical and laboratory information about people over the age of 15 living in the AHRI population research area. During this time researchers have followed more than 160 000 people, of which 92 000 are still in the programme.
-----<<<<< The repository is no longer available. This record is out-dated. The Matter lab provides the archived database version of 2012 and 2013 at https://www.matter.toronto.edu/basic-content-page/data-download. Data linked from the World Community Grid - The Clean Energy Project see at https://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/research/cep1/overview.do and on fighshare https://figshare.com/articles/dataset/moldata_csv/9640427 >>>>>----- The Clean Energy Project Database (CEPDB) is a massive reference database for organic semiconductors with a particular emphasis on photovoltaic applications. It was created to store and provide access to data from computational as well as experimental studies, on both known and virtual compounds. It is a free and open resource designed to support researchers in the field of organic electronics in their scientific pursuits. The CEPDB was established as part of the Harvard Clean Energy Project (CEP), a virtual high-throughput screening initiative to identify promising new candidates for the next generation of carbon-based solar cell materials.
The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File (JEFF) project is a collaboration between NEA Data Bank member countries. The JEFF library combines the efforts of the JEFF and EFF/EAF Working Groups to produce a common sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications. It contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yields, and thermal scattering law data
<<<!!!>>> NVO - National Virtual Observatory is closed now <<<!!! >>> The National Virtual Observatory (NVO) was the predecessor of the VAO. It was a research project aimed at developing the technologies that would be used to build an operational Virtual Observatory. With the NVO era now over, a new organization has been funded in its place, with the explicit goal of creating useful tools for users to take advantage of the groundwork laid by the NVO. To carry on with the NVO's goals, we hereby introduce you to the Virtual Astronomical Observatory http://www.usvao.org/
>>>!!!<<<The IGETS data base at GFZ Potsdam http://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010300 continues the activities of the International Center for Earth Tides (ICET), in particular, in collecting, archiving and distributing Earth tide records from long series of gravimeters, tiltmeters, strainmeters and other geodynamic sensors. >>>!!!<<< The ICET Data Bank contains results from 360 tidal gravity stations: hourly values, main tidal waves obtained by least squares analyses, residual vectors, oceanic attraction and loading vectors. The Data Bank contains also data from tiltmeters and extensometers. ICET is responsible for the Information System and Data Center of the Global Geodynamic Project (GGP). The tasks ascribed to ICET are : to collect all available measurements of Earth tides (which is its task as World Data Centre C), to evaluate these data by convenient methods of analysis in order to reduce the very large amount of measurements to a limited number of parameters which should contain all the desired and needed geophysical information, to compare the data from different instruments and different stations distributed all over the world, evaluate their precision and accuracy from the point of view of internal errors as well as external errors, to help to solve the basic problem of calibrations and to organize reference stations or build reference calibration devices, to fill gaps in information or data as far as feasible, to build a data bank allowing immediate and easy comparison of Earth tide parameters with different Earth models and other geodetical and geophysical parameters like geographical position, Bouguer anomaly, crustal thickness and age, heat flow, ... to ensure a broad diffusion of the results and information to all interested laboratories and individual scientists.
!!! <<< the repository is offline, please use: https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100011650 >>> !!! The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
OpenWorm aims to build the first comprehensive computational model of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a microscopic roundworm. With only a thousand cells, it solves basic problems such as feeding, mate-finding and predator avoidance. Despite being extremely well studied in biology, this organism still eludes a deep, principled understanding of its biology. We are using a bottom-up approach, aimed at observing the worm behaviour emerge from a simulation of data derived from scientific experiments carried out over the past decade. To do so we are incorporating the data available in the scientific community into software models. We are engineering Geppetto and Sibernetic, open-source simulation platforms, to be able to run these different models in concert. We are also forging new collaborations with universities and research institutes to collect data that fill in the gaps All the code we produce in the OpenWorm project is Open Source and available on GitHub.
The International Ocean Discovery Program’s (IODP) Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) is located in the Research Park on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station, Texas. This repository stores DSDP, ODP, and IODP cores from the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, and the Southern Ocean. A satellite repository at Rutgers University houses New Jersey/Delaware land cores 150X and 174AX.
The Analytical Geomagnetic Data Center of the Trans-Regional INTERMAGNET Segment is operated by the Geophysical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (GC RAS). Geomagnetic data are transmitted from observatories and stations located in Russia and near-abroad countries. The Center also provides access to spaceborne data products. The MAGNUS hardware-software system underlies the operation of the Center. Its particular feature is the automated real-time recognition of artificial (anthropogenic) disturbances in incoming data. Being based on fuzzy logic approach, this quality control service facilitates the preparation of the definitive magnetograms from preliminary records carried out by data experts manually. The MAGNUS system also performs on-the-fly multi-criteria estimation of geomagnetic activity using several indicators and provides online tools for modeling electromagnetic parameters in the near-Earth space. The collected geomagnetic data are stored using relational database management system. The geomagnetic database is intended for storing both 1-minute and 1-second data. The results of anthropogenic and natural disturbance recognition are also stored in the database.
The goal of the NeuroElectro Project is to extract information about the electrophysiological properties (e.g. resting membrane potentials and membrane time constants) of diverse neuron types from the existing literature and place it into a centralized database.
<<<!!!<<< OFFLINE >>>!!!>>> A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
<<<!!!<<< This repository is no longer available. >>>!!!>>> BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
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Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring. In 2007, RADARSAT-2 was launched, producing over 75,000 images per year since. In 2019, the RADARSAT Constellation Mission was deployed, using its three-satellite configuration for all-condition coverage. More information about RADARSAT-2 see https://mda.space/en/geo-intelligence/ RADARSAT-2 PORTAL see https://gsiportal.mda.space/gc_cp/#/map
TemperateReefBase is a resource for temperate reef researchers worldwide to use and contribute data. Unique in its role as a one-stop-shop for global temperate reef data, TemperateReefBase was initially established by IMAS in collaboration with the Kelp Ecology Ecosystem Network (KEEN). KEEN was instigated through a National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group which assembled experts from around the world to examine the impacts of global change on kelp-bed ecosystem worldwide. The group has assembled significant global data for kelps, other seaweeds and associated species including fishes, and has embarked on unprecedented global experiments and surveys in which identical experiments and surveys are being conducted at sites in kelp beds around the world to determine global trends and examine the capacity of kelps to respond to disturbance in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is an online discovery interface showcasing temperate reef data collected from around the globe. The portal aims to make this data freely and openly available for the benefit of marine and environmental science as a whole. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is hosted and maintained by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, Australia.
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation
The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken.
STRENDA DB is a storage and search platform supported by the Beilstein-Institut that incorporates the STRENDA Guidelines in a user-friendly, web-based system. If you are an author who is preparing a manuscript containing functional enzymology data, STRENDA DB provides you the means to ensure that your data sets are complete and valid before you submit them as part of a publication to a journal. Data entered in the STRENDA DB submission form are automatically checked for compliance with the STRENDA Guidelines; users receive warnings informing them when necessary information is missing.
The Australian National University undertake work to collect and publish metadata about research data held by ANU, and in the case of four discipline areas, Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Phenomics and Digital Humanities to develop pipelines and tools to enable the publication of research data using a common and repeatable approach. Aims and outcomes: To identify and describe research data held at ANU, to develop a consistent approach to the publication of metadata on the University's data holdings: Identification and curation of significant orphan data sets that might otherwise be lost or inadvertently destroyed, to develop a culture of data data sharing and data re-use.
arthistoricum.net@heiDATA is the research data repository of arthistoricum.net (Specialized Information Service Art - Photography - Design). It provides art historians with the opportunity to permanently publish and archive research data in the field of art history in connection with an open access online publication (e.g. article, ejournal, ebook) hosted by Heidelberg University Library. All research data e.g. images, videos, audio files, tables, graphics etc. receive a DOI (Digital Object Identifier). The data publications can be cited, viewed and permanently linked to as distinct academic output.