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Found 24 result(s)
The repository of the Hamburg Centre for Speech Corpora is used for archiving, maintenance, distribution and development of spoken language corpora. These usually consist of audio and / or video recordings, transcriptions and other data and structured metadata. The corpora treat the focus on multilingualism and are generally freely available for research and teaching. Most of the measures maintained by the HZSK corpora were created in the years 2000-2011 in the framework of the SFB 538 "Multilingualism" at the University of Hamburg. The HZSK however also strives to take linguistic data from other projects or contexts, and to provide also the scientific community for research and teaching are available, provided that they are compatible with the current focus of HZSK, ie especially spoken language and multilingualism.
The Bavarian Archive for Speech Signals (BAS) is a public institution hosted by the University of Munich. This institution was founded with the aim of making corpora of current spoken German available to both the basic research and the speech technology communities via a maximally comprehensive digital speech-signal database. The speech material will be structured in a manner allowing flexible and precise access, with acoustic-phonetic and linguistic-phonetic evaluation forming an integral part of it.
The Language Bank features text and speech corpora with different kinds of annotations in over 60 languages. There is also a selection of tools for working with them, from linguistic analyzers to programming environments. Corpora are also available via web interfaces, and users can be allowed to download some of them. The IP holders can monitor the use of their resources and view user statistics.
The Text Laboratory provides assistance with databases, word lists, corpora and tailored solutions for language technology. We also work on research and development projects alone or in cooperation with others - locally, nationally and internationally. Services and tools: Word and frequency lists, Written corpora, Speech corpora, Multilingual corpora, Databases, Glossa Search Tool, The Oslo-Bergen Tagger, GREI grammar games, Audio files: dialects from Norway and America etc., Nordic Atlas of Language Structures (NALS) Journal, Norwegian in America, NEALT, Ethiopian Language Technology, Access to Corpora
MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements. Additional access: https://lsa.umich.edu/eli/language-resources/micase-micusp.html
The focus of CLARIN INT Portal is on resources that are relevant to the lexicological study of the Dutch language and on resources relevant for research in and development of language and speech technology. For Example: lexicons, lexical databases, text corpora, speech corpora, language and speech technology tools, etc. The resources are: Cornetto-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Corpus of Contemporary Dutch (Corpus Hedendaags Nederlands), Corpus Gysseling, Corpus VU-DNC (VU University Diachronic News text Corpus), Dictionary of the Frisian Language (Woordenboek der Friese Taal), DuELME-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Language Portal (Taalportaal), Namescape, NERD (Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation) and TICCLops (Text-Induced Corpus Clean-up online processing system).
As a member of SWE-CLARIN, the Humanities Lab will provide tools and expertise related to language archiving, corpus and (meta)data management, with a continued emphasis on multimodal corpora, many of which contain Swedish resources, but also other (often endangered) languages, multilingual or learner corpora. As a CLARIN K-centre we provide advice on multimodal and sensor-based methods, including EEG, eye-tracking, articulography, virtual reality, motion capture, av-recording. Current work targets automatic data retrieval from multimodal data sets, as well as the linking of measurement data (e.g. EEG, fMRI) or geo-demographic data (GIS, GPS) to language data (audio, video, text, annotations). We also provide assistance with speech and language technology related matters to various projects. A primary resource in the Lab is The Humanities Lab corpus server, containing a varied set of multimodal language corpora with standardised metadata and linked layers of annotations and other resources.
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
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The KiezDeutsch-Korpus (KiDKo) has been developed by project B6 (PI: Heike Wiese) of the collaborative research centre Information Structure (SFB 632) at the University of Potsdam from 2008 to 2015. KiDKo is a multi-modal digital corpus of spontaneous discourse data from informal, oral peer group situations in multi- and monoethnic speech communities. KiDKo contains audio data from self-recordings, with aligned transcriptions (i.e., at every point in a transcript, one can access the corresponding area in the audio file). The corpus provides parts-of-speech tags as well as an orthographically normalised layer (Rehbein & Schalowski 2013). Another annotation level provides information on syntactic chunks and topological fields. There are several complementary corpora: KiDKo/E (Einstellungen - "attitudes") captures spontaneous data from the public discussion on Kiezdeutsch: it assembles emails and readers' comments posted in reaction to media reports on Kiezdeutsch. By doing so, KiDKo/E provides data on language attitudes, language perceptions, and language ideologies, which became apparent in the context of the debate on Kiezdeutsch, but which frequently related to such broader domains as multilingualism, standard language, language prestige, and social class. KiDKo/LL ("Linguistic Landscape") assembles photos of written language productions in public space from the context of Kiezdeutsch, for instance love notes on walls, park benches, and playgrounds, graffiti in house entrances, and scribbled messages on toilet walls. Contains materials in following languages: Spanish, Italian, Greek, Kurdish, Swedish, French, Croatian, Arabic, Turkish. The corpus is available online via the Hamburger Zentrum für Sprachkorpora (HZSK) https://corpora.uni-hamburg.de/secure/annis-switch.php?instance=kidko .
Språkbanken is a collection of Norwegian language technology resources, and a national infrastructure for language technology and research. Our mandate is to collect and develop language resources, and to make these available for researchers, students and the ICT industry which works with the development of language-based ICT solutions. Språkbanken was established as a language policy initiative, designed to ensure that language technology solutions based on the Norwegian language will be developed, and thereby prevent domain loss of Norwegian in technology-dependent areas, cf. Mål og meining (Report 35, 2007 – 2008). As of today the collection contains resources in both Norwegian Bokmål and Nynorsk, as well as in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian Sign Language (NTS).
The domain of the IDS repository is the German language, mainly in its current form (contemporary New High German). Its designated community are national and international researchers in German and general linguistics. As an institutional repository, the repository provides long term archival of two important IDS projects: the Deutsches Referenzkorpus (‘German Reference Corpus’, DeReKo), which curates a large corpus of written German language, and the Archiv für Gesprochenes Deutsch (‘Archive of Spoken German’, AGD), which curates several corpora of spoken German. In addition, the repository enables germanistic researchers from IDS and from other research facilities and universities to deposit their research data for long term archival of data and metadata arising from research projects.
>>>>>!!!<<<<< As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .>>>>>!!!<<<<<
ORTOLANG is an EQUIPEX project accepted in February 2012 in the framework of investissements d’avenir. Its aim is to construct a network infrastructure including a repository of language data (corpora, lexicons, dictionaries etc.) and readily available, well-documented tools for its processing. Expected outcomes comprize: promoting research on analysis, modelling and automatic processing of our language to their highest international levels thanks to effective resource pooling; facilitating the use and transfer of resources and tools set up within public laboratories to industrial partners, notably SMEs which often cannot develop such resources and tools for language processing given the cost of investment; promoting French language and the regional languages of France by sharing expertise acquired by public laboratories. ORTOLANG is a service for the language, which is complementary to the service offered by Huma-Num (très grande infrastructure de recherche). Ortolang gives access to SLDR for speech, and CNRTL for text resources.
CLARIN-UK is a consortium of centres of expertise involved in research and resource creation involving digital language data and tools. The consortium includes the national library, and academic departments and university centres in linguistics, languages, literature and computer science.
HunCLARIN is a strategic research infrastructure of Hungary’s leading knowledge centres involved in R&D in speech- and language processing. It contains linguistic resources and tools that form the basis of research. The infrastructure has obtained an “SKI” qualification (Strategic Research Infrastructure) in 2010, and has been significantly expanded since. Currently comprising 36 members, the infrastructure includes several general- and specific-purpose text corpora, different language processing tools and analysers, linguistic databases as well as ontologies. RIL HAS was a co-founder of the European CLARIN project, which aims at supporting humanities and social sciences research with the help of language technology and by making digital linguistic resources more easily available. In accordance with these goals HunClarin makes the research infrastructures developed by the respective centres directly accessible for researchers through a common network entry point. A general goal of the infrastructure is to realise the interoperability of the collected research infrastructures and to enable comparing the performance of the respective alternatives and to coordinate different foci in R&D. The coordinator and contact person of the infrastructure is Tamás Váradi, RIL HAS.
CLARIN-LV is a national node of Clarin ERIC (Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure). The mission of the repository is to ensure the availability and long­ term preservation of language resources. The data stored in the repository are being actively used and cited in scientific publications.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
The South African Centre for Digital Language Resources (SADiLaR) is a national centre supported by the Department of Science and Technology (DST). SADiLaR has an enabling function, with a focus on all official languages of South Africa, supporting research and development in the domains of language technologies and language-related studies in the humanities and social sciences.
The goal of the Center of Estonian Language Resources (CELR) is to create and manage an infrastructure to make the Estonian language digital resources (dictionaries, corpora – both text and speech –, various language databases) and language technology tools (software) available to everyone working with digital language materials. CELR coordinates and organises the documentation and archiving of the resources as well as develops language technology standards and draws up necessary legal contracts and licences for different types of users (public, academic, commercial, etc.). In addition to collecting language resources, a system will be launched for introducing the resources to, informing and educating the potential users. The main users of CELR are researchers from Estonian R&D institutions and Social Sciences and Humanities researchers all over the world via the CLARIN ERIC network of similar centers in Europe. Access to data is provided through different sites: Public Repository https://entu.keeleressursid.ee/public-document, Language resources https://keeleressursid.ee/en/resources/corpora, and MetaShare CELR https://metashare.ut.ee/.
An increasing number of Language Resources (LT) in the various fields of Human Language Technology (HLT) are distributed on behalf of ELRA via its operational body ELDA, thanks to the contribution of various players of the HLT community. Our aim is to provide Language Resources, by means of this repository, so as to prevent researchers and developers from investing efforts to rebuild resources which already exist as well as help them identify and access those resources.
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Created in 2005 by the CNRS, CNRTL unites in a single portal, a set of linguistic resources and tools for language processing. The CNRTL includes the identification, documentation (metadata), standardization, storage, enhancement and dissemination of resources. The sustainability of the service and the data is guaranteed by the backing of the UMR ATILF (CNRS - Université Nancy), support of the CNRS and its integration in the excellence equipment project ORTOLANG .
The repository is part of the National Research Data Infrastructure initiative Text+, in which the University of Tübingen is a partner. It is housed at the Department of General and Computational Linguistics. The infrastructure is maintained in close cooperation with the Digital Humanities Centre, which is a core facility of the university, colaborating with the library and computing center of the university. Integration of the repository into the national CLARIN-D and international CLARIN infrastructures gives it wide exposure, increasing the likelihood that the resources will be used and further developed beyond the lifetime of the projects in which they were developed. Among the resources currently available in the Tübingen Center Repository, researchers can find widely used treebanks of German (e.g. TüBa-D/Z), the German wordnet (GermaNet), the first manually annotated digital treebank (Index Thomisticus), as well as descriptions of the tools used by the WebLicht ecosystem for natural language processing.
The CLARIN Centre at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, hosts and manages a data repository (CLARIN-DK-UCPH Repository), which is part of a research infrastructure for humanities and social sciences financed by the University of Copenhagen. The CLARIN-DK-UCPH Repository provides easy and sustainable access for scholars in the humanities and social sciences to digital language data (in written, spoken, video or multimodal form) and provides advanced tools for discovering, exploring, exploiting, annotating, and analyzing data. CLARIN-DK also shares knowledge on Danish language technology and resources and is the Danish node in the European Research Infrastructure Consortium, CLARIN ERIC.
LINDAT/CLARIN is designed as a Czech “node” of Clarin ERIC (Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure). It also supports the goals of the META-NET language technology network. Both networks aim at collection, annotation, development and free sharing of language data and basic technologies between institutions and individuals both in science and in all types of research. The Clarin ERIC infrastructural project is more focused on humanities, while META-NET aims at the development of language technologies and applications. The data stored in the repository are already being used in scientific publications in the Czech Republic. In 2019 LINDAT/CLARIAH-CZ was established as a unification of two research infrastructures, LINDAT/CLARIN and DARIAH-CZ.