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The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI) is in charge of the elaboration and dissemination of geomagnetic indices, and of tables of remarkable magnetic events, based on the report of magnetic observatories distributed all over the planet, with the help of ISGI Collaborating Institutes. The interaction between the solar wind, including plasma and interplanetary magnetic field, and the Earth's magnetosphere results in a transfer of energy and particles inside the magnetosphere. Solar wind characteristics are highly variable, and they have actually a direct influence on the shape and size of the magnetosphere, on the amount of transferred energy, and on the way this energy is dissipated. It is clear that the great diversity of sources of magnetic variations give rise to a great complexity in ground magnetic signatures. Geomagnetic indices aim at describing the geomagnetic activity or some of its components. Each geomagnetic index is related to different phenomena occurring in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and deep in the Earth in its own unique way. The location of a measurement, the timing of the measurement and the way the index is calculated all affect the type of phenomenon the index relates to. The IAGA endorsed geomagnetic indices and lists of remarkable geomagnetic events constitute unique temporal and spatial coverage data series homogeneous since middle of 19th century.
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Among the basic tasks of WDC for Geophysics, Beijing there is collection, handling and storage of science data and giving access to it for usage both in science research and study process. That includes remote access to own information resources for the scientists from the universities and institutions.
Originally named the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), the mission was re-named the Van Allen Probes, following successful launch and commissioning. For simplicity and continuity, the RBSP short-form has been retained for existing documentation, file naming, and data product identification purposes. The RBSPICE investigation including the RBSPICE Instrument SOC maintains compliance with requirements levied in all applicable mission control documents.
Country
The task of WDC geomagnetism is to collect geomagnetic data from all over the globe and distribute those data to researchers and data users, as a World Data Center for Geomagnetism.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.
The Space Physics Interactive Data Resource from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center allows solar terrestrial physics customers to intelligently access and manage historical space physics data for integration with environment models and space weather forecasts.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
SuperDARN is an international HF radar network designed to measure global-scale magnetospheric convection by observing plasma motion in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. This network consists of more than 20 radars operating on frequencies between 8 and 20 MHz that look into the polar regions of Earth. These radars can measure the position and velocity of charged particles in our ionosphere, the highest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, and provide scientists with information regarding Earth's interaction with the space environment.
The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership based at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland and a component of the National Space Weather Program. The CCMC provides, to the international research community, access to modern space science simulations. In addition, the CCMC supports the transition to space weather operations of modern space research models.
The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) leads in the design and implementation of unique multi-mission and multi-disciplinary data services and software to strategically advance NASA's solar-terrestrial program, to extend our science understanding of the structure, physics and dynamics of the Heliosphere of our Sun and to support the science missions of NASA's Heliophysics Great Observatory. Major SPDF efforts include multi-mission data services such as Heliophysics Data Portal (formerly VSPO), CDAWeb and CDAWeb Inside IDL,and OMNIWeb Plus (including COHOWeb, ATMOWeb, HelioWeb and CGM) , science planning and orbit services such as SSCWeb, data tools such as the CDF software and tools, and a range of other science and technology research efforts. The staff supporting SPDF includes scientists and information technology experts.
The WDC has a FTP-server to distribute the PCN index derived from the geomagnetic observatory Qaanaaq (THL) and the Kp-index data products derived at the geomagnetic observatory Niemegk (NGK). The WDC is also holding extensive archives of magnetograms and other geomagnetic observatory data products that predate the introduction of digital data recording. The material is in analogue form such as film or microfiche. The Polar Cap index (abbreviation PC index) consists of the Polar Cap North (PCN) and the Polar Cap South (PCS) index, which are derived from magnetic measurements taken at the geomagnetic observatories Qaanaaq (THL, Greenland, +85o magnetic latitude) and Vostok (VOS, Antarctica, -83o magnetic latitude), respectively. The idea behind these indices is to estimate the intensity of anti-sunward plasma convection in the polar caps. This convection is associated with electric Hall currents and consequent magnetic field variations perpendicular to the antisunward plasma flow (and related Hall current) which can be monitored at the Qaanaaq and Vostok magnetic observatories. PC aims at monitoring the energy input from solar wind to the magnetosphere (loading activity). The index is constructed in such a way that it has a linear relationship with the merging Electric Field at the magnetopause; consequently PC is given in units of mV/m as for the electric field. In August 2013, the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) endorsed the PC index. The endorsed PC index is accessible at pcindex.org or through WDC Copenhagen.