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The Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon by Bowker and Hughes (NASA SP-206) is considered the definitive reference manual to the global photographic coverage of the Moon. The images contained within the atlas are excellent for studying lunar morphology because they were obtained at low to moderate Sun angles. The digital Lunar Orbiter Atlas of the Moon is a reproduction of the 675 plates contained in Bowker and Hughes. The digital archive, however, offers many improvements upon its original hardbound predecessor. Multiple search capabilities were added to the database to expedite locating images and features of interest. For accuracy and usability, surface feature information has been updated and improved. Lastly, to aid in feature identification, a companion image containing feature annotation has been included. The symbols on the annotated overlays, however, should only be used as locators and not for precise measurements. More detailed information about the digital archive process can be read in abstracts presented at the 30th and 31st Lunar and Planetary Science Conferences.
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DARTS primarily archives high-level data products obtained by JAXA's space science missions in astrophysics (X-rays, radio, infrared), solar physics, solar-terrestrial physics, and lunar and planetary science. In addition, we archive related space science data products obtained by other domestic or foreign institutes, and provide data services to facilitate use of these data.
Country
NSSDC is the nation-level space science data center which recognized by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China. As a repository for space science data, NSSDC assumes the responsibility of the long-term stewardship and offering a reliable service of space science data in China. It also has been the Chinese center for space science of the World Data Center (WDC) since 1988. In 2013, NSSDC became a regular member of World Data System. Data resources are concentrated in the following fields of space physics and space environment, space astronomy, lunar and planetary science, space application and engineering. In space physics, the NSSDC maintains space-based observation data and ground-based observation data of the middle and upper atmosphere, ionosphere and earth surface, from Geo-space Double Star Exploration Program and Meridian Project. In space astronomy, NSSDC archived pointed observation data of Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope. In lunar and planetary science, space application and engineering, NSSDC also collects detection data of Chang’E from Lunar Exploration Program and science products of BeiDou satellites.
The NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive serves as the permanent archive for NASA space science mission data. "Space science" means astronomy and astrophysics, solar and space plasma physics, and planetary and lunar science. As permanent archive, NSSDCA teams with NASA's discipline-specific space science "active archives" which provide access to data to researchers and, in some cases, to the general public. NSSDCA also serves as NASA's permanent archive for space physics mission data. It provides access to several geophysical models and to data from some non-NASA mission data. In addition to supporting active space physics and astrophysics researchers, NSSDCA also supports the general public both via several public-interest web-based services (e.g., the Photo Gallery) and via the offline mailing of CD-ROMs, photoprints, and other items.
The primary function of this database is to provide authoritative information about meteorite names. The correct spelling, complete with punctuation and diacritical marks, of all known meteorites recognized by the Meteoritical Society may be found in this compilation. Official abbreviations for many meteorites are documented here as well. The database also contains status information for meteorites with provisional names, and listings for specimens of doubtful origin and pseudometeorites. A seconday purpose of this database is to provide an interface to map services for the display of geographic information about meteorites. Two are currently implemented here. If the user has installed the free NASA program World Wind, links are provided for each meteorite to zoom the program to the find location. The database also provides links to the Google Maps service for the display of find locations.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.