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The World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) collects standardized observations on changes in mass, volume, area and length of glaciers with time (glacier fluctuations), as well as statistical information on the distribution of perennial surface ice in space (glacier inventories). Such glacier fluctuation and inventory data are high priority key variables in climate system monitoring; they form a basis for hydrological modelling with respect to possible effects of atmospheric warming, and provide fundamental information in glaciology, glacial geomorphology and quaternary geology. The highest information density is found for the Alps and Scandinavia, where long and uninterrupted records are available. As a contribution to the Global Terrestrial/Climate Observing System (GTOS, GCOS), the Division of Early Warning and Assessment and the Global Environment Outlook of UNEP, and the International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO, the WGMS collects and publishes worldwide standardized glacier data.
The MGDS MediaBank contains high quality images, illustrations, animations and video clips that are organized into galleries. Media can be sorted by category, and keyword and map-based search options are provided. Each item in the MediaBank is accompanied by metadata that provides access into our cruise catalog and data repository.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
EarthScope is an Earth science program to explore the 4-dimensional structure of the North American continent. The EarthScope Program provides a framework for broad, integrated studies across the Earth sciences, including research on fault properties and the earthquake process, strain transfer, magmatic and hydrous fluids in the crust and mantle, plate boundary processes, large-scale continental deformation, continental structure and evolution, and composition and structure of the deep Earth. In addition, EarthScope offers a centralized forum for Earth science education at all levels and an excellent opportunity to develop cyberinfrastructure to integrate, distribute, and analyze diverse data set.
In its 10-year tenure, NCED has made major contributions to the growth of Earth-Surface Dynamics (ESD) through direct research in three Integrated Programs (IP) of Streams, Watersheds and Deltas. These contributions include: Establishment of experimental geomorphology and stratigraphy as a major source of insight in ESD, Integration of quantitative methods from engineering, physics, and applied math into ESD, Advances in the coupling of life, especially vegetation, and landscape dynamics, Integration of a variety of novel methods from stochastic hydrology, including nonlocal transport and multifractal spatial signatures, into ESD, Advances in providing the scientific basis for restoring streams, and Integration of subsurface structure and stratigraphic records into understanding present-day delta dynamics. All data created or compiled by NCED-funded scientists is archived here.
The goal of NGEE–Arctic is to reduce uncertainty in projections of future climate by developing and validating a model representation of permafrost ecosystems and incorporating that representation into Earth system models. The new modeling capabilities will improve our confidence in model projections and will enable scientist to better respond to questions about processes and interactions now and in the future. It also will allow them to better communicate important results concerning climate change to decision makers and the general public. And let's not forget about summer in the Antarctic, which happens during our winter months.