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Found 72 result(s)
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Discuss Data is an open repository for storing, sharing and discussing research data on Eastern Europe, the South Caucasus and Central Asia. The platform, launched in September 2020, is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and operated by the Research Centre for East European Studies at the University of Bremen (FSO) and the Göttingen State and University Library (SUB). Discuss Data goes beyond ordinary repositories and offers an interactive online platform for the discussion and quality assessment of research data. Our aim is to create a space for academic communication and for the community-specific publication, curation, annotation and discussion of research data.
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The TRR228DB is the project-database of the Collaborative Research Centre 228 "Future Rural Africa: Future-making and social-ecological transformation" (CRC/Transregio 228, https://www.crc228.de) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG, German Research Foundation – Project number 328966760). The project-database is a new implementation of the TR32DB and online since 2018. It handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne and Bonn) and research fields (e.g. anthropology, agroeconomics, ecology, ethnology, geography, politics and soil sciences). The data is resulting from several field campaigns, interviews, surveys, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected.
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The Social Science Japan Data Archive (SSJDA) collects, maintains, and provides access to the academic community, a vast archive of social science data (quantitative data obtained from social surveys) for secondary analyses.
The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Data and Specimen Hub (DASH) is a centralized resource that allows researchers to share and access de-identified data from studies funded by NICHD. DASH also serves as a portal for requesting biospecimens from selected DASH studies.
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The “ICSSR Data Service” is culmination of signing of Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR) and Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation (MoSPI). The MoU provides for setting-up of “ICSSR Data Service: Social Science Data Repository” and host NSS and ASI datasets generated by MoSPI. Under the initiative, social science research institutes, NGOs, individuals and others dealing with social science research are also being approached to deposit / provide their research datasets for hosting into the repository of ICSSR Data Service. The ICSSR Data Service includes social science and statistical datasets of various national-level surveys on debt & investment, domestic tourism, enterprise survey, employment and unemployment, housing condition, household consumer expenditure, health care, etc., into its repository. ICSSR Data Service aims to facilitate data sharing, preservation, accessibility and reuse of social science research data collected from entire social science community in India & abroad. The Information and Library Network (INFLIBNET) Centre, Gandhinagar has been assigned the task of setting-up the data repository.
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GESIS preserves (mainly quantitative) social research data to make it available to the scientific research community. The data is described in a standardized way, secured for the long term, provided with a permanent identifier (DOI), and can be easily found and reused through browser-optimized catalogs (https://search.gesis.org/).
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The Research Data Center for Higher Education Research and Science Studies (FDZ-DZHW) at the German Centre for Higher Education Research and Science Studies (DZHW) in Hannover provides the scientific community with quantitative and qualitative research data from the field of higher education and science studies for research and teaching purposes. The data pool of the Research Data Centre is based on two sources: Firstly, it contains the current surveys of the panels conducted in-house (especially DZHW Graduate Panel, Social Survey, DZHW Panel Study of School Leavers with a Higher Education Entrance Qualification, DZHW Scientists Survey), which are integrated by default. Secondly, the Research Data Centre constantly processes, documents and integrates inventory data of the DZHW and its prior organisations. External data from the research area is also integrated into the FDZ data pool.
The MRC National Survey of Health and Development 1946 (NSHD) was the first ever British birth cohort study. It has collected information from birth to the current day on the health and life circumstances of five and a half thousand men and women born during a week in March 1946 throughout England, Wales, and Scotland. The study explores differences in child development by factors like social class, biological factors, health and education. Due to the length of the study it has developed into a study of ageing.
The Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) is a multi-center, longitudinal, prospective observational study of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The overall aim of the OAI is to develop a public domain research resource to facilitate the scientific evaluation of biomarkers for osteoarthritis as potential surrogate endpoints for disease onset and progression.
The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study changed its name to The Future of Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS). Note that all documentation issued prior to January 2023 contains the study’s former name. Any further reference to FFCWS should kindly observe this name change. The Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study is following a cohort of nearly 5,000 children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 (roughly three-quarters of whom were born to unmarried parents). We refer to unmarried parents and their children as “fragile families” to underscore that they are families and that they are at greater risk of breaking up and living in poverty than more traditional families. The core Study was originally designed to primarily address four questions of great interest to researchers and policy makers: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?
The Twenty-07 Study was set up in 1986 in order to investigate the reasons for differences in health by socio-economic circumstances, gender, area of residence, age, ethnic group, and family type. 4510 people are being followed for 20 years. The initial wave of data collection took place in 1987/8, when respondents were aged 15, 35 and 55. The final wave of data collection took place in 2007/08 when respondents were aged 35, 55 and 75. In this way the Twenty-07 Study provides us with unique opportunities to investigate both the changes in people's lives over 20 years and how they affect their health, and the differences in people's experiences at the same ages 20 years apart, and how these have different effects on their health.
The Whitehall II study was established to explore the relationship between socio-economic status, stress and cardiovascular disease. A cohort of 10,308 participants aged 35-55, of whom 3,413 were women and 6,895 men, was recruited from the British Civil Service in 1985. Since this first wave of data collection, self-completion questionnaires and clinical data have been collected from the cohort every two to five years with a high level of participation. Data collection is intended to continue until 2030.
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WHIP is a database of individual work histories, based on Inps administrative archives. The reference population is made up by all the people – Italian and foreign – who have worked in Italy even only for only a part of their working career. A large representative sample has been extracted from this population: in the standard file the sampling coefficient is about 1: 180, for a dynamic population of about 370,000 people (figures will be doubled in the full edition). For each of these people the main episodes of their working careers are observed. The complete list of observations includes: private employee working contracts, atypical contracts, self-employment activities as artisan, trader and some activities as freelancer, retirement spells, as well as non-working spells in which the individual received social benefits, like unemployment subsidies or mobility benefits. The workers for whom activity is not observed in WHIP are those who worked in the public sector or as freelancers (lawyers or notaries) – who have an autonomous security fund. The WHIP section concerning employee contracts is a Linked Employer Employee Database: in addition to the data about the contract, thanks to a linkage with the Inps Firm Observatory, data concerning the firm in which the worker is employed is also available.
The Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS) are population based studies of individuals aged 65 years and over living in the community, including institutions, which is the only large multi-centred population-based study in the UK that has reached sufficient maturity. There are three main studies within the CFAS group. MRC CFAS, the original study began in 1989, with three of its sites providing a parent subset for the comparison two decades later with CFAS II (2008 onwards). Subsequently another CFAS study, CFAS Wales began in 2011.
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<<<!!!<<< This is an archived site (as of 30 June 2016) >>>!!!>>> The Research Data Center (RDC) of the Collaborative Research Center 882 "From heterogeneities to inequalities" at Bielefeld University provides external scientists access to the research data generated in the CRC 882. It provides access to both qualitative and quantitative data from the field of inequality research. The CRC 882 RDC supports external researchers who are reusing the data, as well as gives advice on data documentation and anonymization procedures to the researchers of the CRC to ensure high data quality. The datasets include, for example, a panel on youth crime, different series of interviews on ethnicity, paternal life and recalls of employees, as well as other panels, interview data and experimental data. In the further course of the Collaborative Research Center the database will be expanded with the data of future projects. External scientists can make an application for the scientific use of CRC 882 Research Data. In accordance with data privacy requirements, the access will be organized via controlled remote data access or via on-site use. For this purpose, the RDC provides workplaces for guest researchers.
The Research Data Center PIAAC (RDC PIAAC) has been accredited by the German Data Forum (RatSWD). The RDC PIAAC makes research data accessible to the scientific community and offers advice to the users. The RDC PIAAC provides German and international datasets in the educational field focusing on the adult population, especially on the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).
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More than a quarter of a million people — one in 10 NSW men and women aged over 45 — have been recruited to our 45 and Up Study, the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere. The baseline information collected from all of our participants is available in the Study’s Data Book. This information, which researchers use as the basis for their analyses, contains information on key variables such as height, weight, smoking status, family history of disease and levels of physical activity. By following such a large group of people over the long term, we are developing a world-class research resource that can be used to boost our understanding of how Australians are ageing. This will answer important health and quality-of-life questions and help manage and prevent illness through improved knowledge of conditions such as cancer, heart disease, depression, obesity and diabetes.
The National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) is an NHLBI-supported repository for sharing large amounts of sleep data (polysomnography, actigraphy and questionnaire-based) from multiple cohorts, clinical trials, and other data sources. Launched in April 2014, the mission of the NSRR is to advance sleep and circadian science by supporting secondary data analysis, algorithmic development, and signal processing through the sharing of high-quality data sets.
Polish CLARIN node – CLARIN-PL Language Technology Centre – is being built at Wrocław University of Technology. The LTC is addressed to scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Registered users are granted free access to digital language resources and advanced tools to explore them. They can also archive and share their own language data (in written, spoken, video or multimodal form).
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Research Data Centres offer a secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada's surveys, and to Canadian censuses' data, as well as to an increasing number of administrative data sets. The search engine was designed to help you find out more easily which dataset among all the surveys available in the RDCs best suits your research needs.
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, digitised content, archival records, or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. An automated connection to the ETH Data Archive in the background ensures the medium to long-term preservation of all publications and research data. Direct access to the ETH Data Archive is intended only for customers who need to deposit software source code within the framework of ETH transfer Software Registration. Open Source code packages and other content from legacy workflows can be accessed via ETH Library @ swisscovery (https://library.ethz.ch/en/).
TRAILS is a prospective cohort study, which started in 2001 with population cohort and 2004 with a clinical cohort (CC). Since then, a group of 2500 young people from the Northern part of the Netherlands has been closely monitored in order to chart and explain their mental, physical, and social development. These TRAILS participants have been measured every two to three years, by means of questionnaires, interviews, and all kinds of tests. By now, we have collected information that spans the total period from preadolescence up until young adulthood. One of the main goals of TRAILS is to contribute to the knowledge of the development of emotional and behavioral problems and the (social) functioning of preadolescents into adulthood, their determinants, and underlying mechanisms.
INDEPTH is a global network of research centres that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). INDEPTH aims to strengthen global capacity for Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs), and to mount multi-site research to guide health priorities and policies in LMICs, based on up-to-date scientific evidence. The data collected by the INDEPTH Network members constitute a valuable resource of population and health data for LMIC countries. This repository aims to make well documented anonymised longitudinal microdata from these Centres available to data users.