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Found 45 result(s)
The World Ocean Database (WOD) provides access to scientifically quality-controlled global ocean profile and plankton data that includes measured in situ variables gathered since 1773. WOD contains the World Ocean Database 2013 (WOD13) with the full set of quality control used to create World Ocean Atlas 2013 (WOA13) and all updates to the database (Apr. 2013 to present) with only initial quality control. Note: The WOD13 has extended standard depth levels.
Thousands of Temperature and salinity profiles obtained by means of Nansen hydrographic casts and available earlier only as station sheets have been digitized at the German Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). In a cooperative effort between the KlimaCampus of the University of Hamburg and the German Oceanographic Data Centre (DOD, Hamburg) about 7500 hydrographic profiles were checked and identified as missing in the international oceanographic databases. Since most of the profiles were obtained in the decades before the second World War they represent an important extension of the international historical database and a respective contribution to the IOC Global Oceanographic Data Archeology and Rescue Project (GODAR). Since 2009 our efforts resulted in locating about 7500 hydrographic profiles that are not yet available for the oceanographic community.
The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) site offers operational data in near-real time and historic contexts. Focus is on tides and currents but also includes information on harmful algal blooms and weather, etc. Data access is made possible through geopspatial web interfaces as well as OPeNDAP services, etc.
The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) is a component of NASAs Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). LP DAAC processes, archives, and distributes land data and products derived from the EOS sensors. Located just outside Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the LP DAAC handles data from three EOS instruments aboard two operational satellite platforms: ASTER and MODIS from Terra, and MODIS from Aqua. ASTER data are received, processed, distributed, and archived while MODIS land products are received, distributed, and archived.
AIRS moves climate research and weather prediction into the 21st century. AIRS is one of six instruments on board the Aqua satellite, part of the NASA Earth Observing System. AIRS along with its partner microwave instrument the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit AMSU-A, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. Together these instruments observe the global water and energy cycles, climate variation and trends, and the response of the climate system to increased greenhouse gases.
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
Climate4impact: a dedicated interface to ESGF for the climate impact community The portal Climate4impact, part of the ENES Data Infrastructure, provides access to data and quick looks of global and regional climate models and downscaled higher resolution climate data. The portal provides data transformation tooling and mapping & plotting capabilities, guidance, documentation, FAQ and examples.
!!!! We're planning to retire the Community Data Portal (CDP) after nearly 15 years of service. The most active datasets will be migrated to the Climate Data Gateway website. We tentatively plan to shutdown the CDP service by Jan 31, 2018. Please contact us with questions or concerns. !!!! The Community Data Portal (CDP) is a collection of earth science datasets from NCAR, UCAR, UOP, and participating organizations.
The Precipitation Processing System (PPS) evolved from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Science Data and Information System (TSDIS). The purpose of the PPS is to process, analyze and archive data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, partner satellites and the TRMM mission. The PPS also supports TRMM by providing validation products from TRMM ground radar sites. All GPM, TRMM and Partner public data products are available to the science community and the general public from the TRMM/GPM FTP Data Archive. Please note that you need to register to be able to access this data. Registered users can also search for GPM, partner and TRMM data, order custom subsets and set up subscriptions using our PPS Data Products Ordering Interface (STORM)
MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (originally known as EOS AM-1) and Aqua (originally known as EOS PM-1) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. Terra MODIS and Aqua MODIS are viewing the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands, or groups of wavelengths (see MODIS Technical Specifications). These data will improve our understanding of global dynamics and processes occurring on the land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. MODIS is playing a vital role in the development of validated, global, interactive Earth system models able to predict global change accurately enough to assist policy makers in making sound decisions concerning the protection of our environment.
AVISO stands for "Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data". Here, you will find data, articles, news and tools to help you discover or improve your skills in the altimetry domain through four key themes: ocean, coast, hydrology and ice. Altimetry is a technique for measuring height. Satellite altimetry measures the time taken by a radar pulse to travel from the satellite antenna to the surface and back to the satellite receiver. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield sea-surface heights.
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MISTRALS database is a distributed system, that enables users to access datasets produced by all the projects (ChArMEx, HyMeX, MERMex, TerMex, CORSiCA, EMSO and MOOSE) and stored in different data centres. MISTRALS (Mediterranean Integrated STudies at Regional And Local Scales) is a decennial program for systematic observations and research dedicated to the understanding of the Mediterranean Basin environmental process under the planet global change. It aims to coordinate, across the Mediterranean Basin, interdisciplinary research on atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and paleo-climate, including environmental ecology and social sciences. The objective is to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms shaping and influencing landscape, environment and human impact of this eco-region.
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Building upon the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the GPM concept centers on the deployment of a “Core” satellite carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites.
The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through managing data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis. The CEDA Archive operates the atmospheric and earth observation data centre functions on behalf of NERC for the UK atmospheric science and earth observation communities. It covers climate, composition, observations and NWP data as well as various earth observation datasets, including airborne and satellite data and imagery. Prior to November 2016 these functions were operted by CEDA under the titles of the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) and the NERC Earth Observation Data Centre (NEODC). CEDA also operates the UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC), which curates and provides access to archives of data from the upper atmosphere, ionosphere and Earth's solar environment.
Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
On February 24, 2000, Terra began collecting what will ultimately become a new, 15-year global data set on which to base scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Together with the entire fleet of EOS spacecraft, Terra is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change. TERRA's data collection instruments include: Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)
One of twelve NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Data Centers that provide Earth science data, information, and services to research scientists, applications scientists, applications users, and students. The GES DISC is the home (archive) of NASA Precipitation and Hydrology, as well as Atmospheric Composition and Dynamics remote sensing data and information. The DISC also houses the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data assimilation datasets (generated by GSFC’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office), and the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) data products (both generated by GSFC's Hydrological Sciences Branch).
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
U.S. IOOS is a vital tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. A primary focus of U.S. IOOS is integration of, and expedited access to, ocean observation data for improved decision making. The Data Management and Communication (DMAC) subsystem of U.S. IOOS serves as a central mechanism for integrating all existing and projected data sources.
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
The KNMI Data Centre (KDC) provides access to weather, climate and seismological datasets of KNMI. For each dataset descriptive information is available (metadata), including a point of contact. The KNMI Data Centre (KDC) provides access to KNMI data on weather, climate and seismology. You will find KNMI data on various topics such as: the most recent 10 minutes of observations, historical data, data on meteorological stations, modeling, earthquake data and satellite products.
The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
The IRI/LDEO Climate Data Library is a collection of climate data sets with the focus of climate change monitoring and mitigation. Browse data by category and source, navigate and analyze datasets using maps, and the Ingrid Data Analysis Language. The IRI/LDEO also includes web tutorials.
The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).