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Found 12 result(s)
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).
The HEASARC is a multi-mission astronomy archive for the EUV, X-ray, and Gamma ray wave bands. Because EUV, X and Gamma rays cannot reach the Earth's surface it is necessary to place the telescopes and sensors on spacecraft. The HEASARC now holds the data from 25 observatories covering over 30 years of X-ray, extreme-ultraviolet and gamma-ray astronomy. Data and software from many of the older missions were restored by the HEASARC staff. Examples of these archived missions include ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, Compton GRO, HEAO 1, Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2), EUVE, EXOSAT, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, ROSAT, Rossi XTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton.
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"Seanoe (SEA scieNtific Open data Edition) is a publisher of scientific data in the field of marine sciences. It is operated by Ifremer (http://wwz.ifremer.fr/). Data published by SEANOE are available free. They can be used in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons license selected by the author of data. Seance contributes to Open Access / Open Science movement for a free access for everyone to all scientific data financed by public funds for the benefit of research. An embargo limited to 2 years on a set of data is possible; for example to restrict access to data of a publication under scientific review. Each data set published by SEANOE has a DOI which enables it to be cited in a publication in a reliable and sustainable way. The long-term preservation of data filed in SEANOE is ensured by Ifremer infrastructure. "
BioMagResBank (BMRB) is the publicly-accessible depository for NMR results from peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids recognized by the International Society of Magnetic Resonance and by the IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB Inter-Union Task Group on the Standardization of Data Bases of Protein and Nucleic Acid Structures Determined by NMR Spectroscopy. In addition, BMRB provides reference information and maintains a collection of NMR pulse sequences and computer software for biomolecular NMR
The CALIPSO satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. CALIPSO combines an active lidar instrument with passive infrared and visible imagers to probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. CALIPSO was launched on April 28, 2006, with the CloudSat satellite. CALIPSO and CloudSat are highly complementary and together provide new, never-before-seen 3D perspectives of how clouds and aerosols form, evolve, and affect weather and climate. CALIPSO and CloudSat fly in formation with three other satellites in the A-train constellation to enable an even greater understanding of our climate system.
A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z ≤ 100), at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.
The Innsbruck Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) DataBase node holds relative cross sections for dissociative electron attachment processes of the form: AB + e– –> A– + B, where AB is a molecule. It hence supports querying by various identifiers for molecules and atoms, such as chemical names, stoichiometric formulae, InChI (-keys) and CAS registry numbers. These identifiers are searched both in products and reactants of the processes. It then returns XSAMS files describing the processes found including numeric values for the relative cross sections of the processes. Alternatively, cross sections can be exported as plain ASCII files.
The Open Exoplanet Catalogue is a catalogue of all discovered extra-solar planets. It is a new kind of astronomical database. It is decentralized and completely open. We welcome contributions and corrections from both professional astronomers and the general public.
The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) was initially developed to provide a central data bank for NASA's Crustal Dynamics Project (CDP). The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data products in a central data bank, to maintain information about the archival of these data, and to disseminate these data and information in a timely manner to NASA investigators and cooperating institutions.
Network Repository is the first interactive data repository for graph and network data. It hosts graph and network datasets, containing hundreds of real-world networks and benchmark datasets. Unlike other data repositories, Network Repository provides interactive analysis and visualization capabilities to allow researchers to explore, compare, and investigate graph data in real-time on the web.