Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 22 result(s)
Country
PTB is the national metrology institute of the Federal Republic of Germany. The Open Access Repository of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt grants free access to a number of factual datasets and documents that were elaborated at PTB. This includes publications such as the "PTB-Mitteilungen", the metrological expert journal of PTB, and numerous of documents from the field of legal metrology.
The ASTER Volcano Archive (AVA) is the worlds largest specialty archive of volcano data. For 1,549 recently active volcanos listed by the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program, the AVA has collected the entirety of high-resolution multispectral ASTER data and made it available to the public. Also included are digital elevation maps, NOAA ash advisories, alteration zone imagery, and thermal anomaly reports. LANDSAT7 data are also being processed.
The NASA/GEWEX SRB project is a major component of the GEWEX radiation research. The objective of the NASA/GEWEX SRB project is to determine surface, top-of-atmosphere (TOA), and atmospheric shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes with the precision needed to predict transient climate variations and decadal-to-centennial climate trends.
Country
Indian Space Science Programme has the primary goal of promoting and establishing space science and technology programme. The ISSDC is the primary data center to be retrieved from Indian space science missions. This center is responsible for the collections of payload data and related ancillary data for space science missions such as Chandrayaan, Astrosat, Youthsat, etc. The payload data sets can include a range of information including satellite images, X-ray spectrometer readings, and other space observations.
The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth hosts the best and most complete online collection of astronaut photographs of the Earth from 1961 through the present. This service is provided by the International Space Station program and the JSC Earth Science & Remote Sensing Unit, ARES Division, Exploration Integration Science Directorate.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
On February 24, 2000, Terra began collecting what will ultimately become a new, 15-year global data set on which to base scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Together with the entire fleet of EOS spacecraft, Terra is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change. TERRA's data collection instruments include: Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)
The CALIPSO satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. CALIPSO combines an active lidar instrument with passive infrared and visible imagers to probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. CALIPSO was launched on April 28, 2006, with the CloudSat satellite. CALIPSO and CloudSat are highly complementary and together provide new, never-before-seen 3D perspectives of how clouds and aerosols form, evolve, and affect weather and climate. CALIPSO and CloudSat fly in formation with three other satellites in the A-train constellation to enable an even greater understanding of our climate system.
Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) was launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit on December 18, 1999, aboard TERRA, a NASA satellite orbiting 705 km above the Earth. MOPITT monitors changes in pollution patterns and the effects on Earth’s troposphere. MOPITT uses near-infrared radiation at 2.3 µm and thermal-infrared radiation at 4.7 µm to calculate atmospheric profiles of CO.
GRID-Geneva is a unique platform providing analyses and solutions for a wide range of environmental issues. GRID-Geneva serves primarily the needs of its three institutional partners - UNEP, the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) and the University of Geneva (UniGe) - which are linked by an ongoing, multi-year “Partnership Agreement”, along with other local-to-global stakeholders. GRID-Geneva is also a bilingual English and French centre and the key francophone link within the global GRID network of centres. GRID-Geneva is a key centre of geo-spatial know-how, with strengths in GIS, IP/remote sensing and statistical analyses, integrated through modern spatial data infrastructures and web applications. Working at the interface between scientific information and policy/decision-making, GRID-Geneva also helps to develop capacities in these fields of expertise among target audiences, countries and other groups.
The ASTER Project consists of two parts, each having a Japanese and a U.S. component. Mission operations are split between Japan Space Systems (J-spacesystems) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the U.S. J-spacesystems oversees monitoring instrument performance and health, developing the daily schedule command sequence, processing Level 0 data to Level 1, and providing higher level data processing, archiving, and distribution. The JPL ASTER project provides scheduling support for U.S. investigators, calibration and validation of the instrument and data products, coordinating the U.S. Science Team, and maintaining the science algorithms. The joint Japan/U.S. ASTER Science Team has about 40 scientists and researchers. Data access via NASA Reverb, ASTER Japan site, earth explorer, GloVis,GDEx and LP DAAC. See here https://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/data.asp. In Addition data are availabe through the newly implemented ASTER Volcano archive (AVA) https://ava.jpl.nasa.gov/ .
HITRAN is an acronym for high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database. The HITRAN compilation of the SAO (HIgh resolution TRANmission molecular absorption database) is used for predicting and simulating transmission and emission of light in atmospheres. It is the world-standard database in molecular spectroscopy. The journal article describing it is the most cited reference in the geosciences. There are presently about 5000 HITRAN users world-wide. Its associated database HITEMP (high-temperature spectroscopic absorption parameters) is accessible by the HITRAN website.
The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded Landmap service which ran from 2001 to July 2014 collected, modified and hosted a large amount of earth observation data for the majority of the UK, including imagery from ERS satellites, ENVISAT and ALOS, high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and aerial photography dating back to 1930. After removal of JISC funding in 2013, the Landmap service is no longer operational, with the data now held at the NEODC. Aside from the thermal imagery data which stands alone, the data reside in four collections: optical, elevation, radar and feature.
As part of the Copernicus Space Component programme, ESA manages the coordinated access to the data procured from the various Contributing Missions and the Sentinels, in response to the Copernicus users requirements. The Data Access Portfolio documents the data offer and the access rights per user category. The CSCDA portal is the access point to all data, including Sentinel missions, for Copernicus Core Users as defined in the EU Copernicus Programme Regulation (e.g. Copernicus Services).The Copernicus Space Component (CSC) Data Access system is the interface for accessing the Earth Observation products from the Copernicus Space Component. The system overall space capacity relies on several EO missions contributing to Copernicus, and it is continuously evolving, with new missions becoming available along time and others ending and/or being replaced.
The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) onboard the ENVISAT satellite provided atmospheric infrared limb emission spectra. From these, profiles of temperature and atmospheric trace gases were retrieved using the research data processor developed at the Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung (IMK), which is complemented by the component of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) treatment from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA). The MIPAS data products on this server are commonly known as IMK/IAA MIPAS Level2 data products. The MIPAS instrument measured during two time frames: from 2002 to 2004 in full spectral resolution (high resolution = HR aka full resolution = FR), and from 2005 to 2012 in reduced spectral, but improved spatial resolution (reduced resolution = RR aka optimized resolution = OR). For this reason, there are different version numbers covering the full MIPAS mission period: xx for the HR/FR period, and 2xx for the RR/OR period (example: 61 for HR/FR, 261 for RR/OR). Beyond this, measurements were conducted in different modes covering different altitude ranges during the RR period: Nominal (6 – 70 km), MA (18 – 102 km), NLC (39 – 102 km), UA (42 – 172 km), UTLS-1 (5.5 – 19 km), UTLS-2 (12 – 42 km), AE (7 – 38 km). The non-nominal modes are identified by the following version numbers: MA = 5xx, NLC = 7xx, UA = 6xx, UTLS-1/2 = 1xx (no retrievals for AE mode).
Content type(s)
Country
Sextant is a marine and coastal geographic data infrastructure. It is operated by Scientific Information Systems for the Sea (SISMER) of Ifremer (https://www.ifremer.fr/). Sextant aims to document, disseminate and promote a catalog of data related to the marine environment. For Ifremer's laboratories and partners, as well as for national and European actors working in the marine and coastal field, Sextant provides tools that promote and facilitate the archiving, consultation and availability of these geographical data. Data published by Sextant are available free or restricted. They can be used in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons license selected by the author of data. Sextant infrastructure and the technologies used are in line with the implementation of the INSPIRE Directive and make it possible to follow the Open Data approach. Some data set published by Sextant has a DOI which enables it to be cited in a publication in a reliable and sustainable way. The long-term preservation of data filed in Sextant is ensured by Ifremer infrastructure.
Content type(s)
The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
The name Earth Online derives from ESA's Earthnet programme. Earthnet prepares and attracts new ESA Earth Observation missions by setting the international cooperation scheme, preparing the basic infrastructure, building the scientific and application Community and competency in Europe to define and set-up own European Programmes in consultation with member states. Earth Online is the entry point for scientific-technical information on Earth Observation activities by the European Space Agency (ESA). The web portal provides a vast amount of content, grown and collected over more than a decade: Detailed technical information on Earth Observation (EO) missions; Satellites and sensors; EO data products & services; Online resources such as catalogues and library; Applications of satellite data; Access to promotional satellite imagery. After 10 years of operations on distinct sites, the two principal portals of ESA Earth Observation - Earth Online (earth.esa.int) and the Principal Investigator's Portal (eopi.esa.int) have moved to a new platform. ESA's technical and scientific earth observation user communities will from now on be served from a single portal, providing a modern and easy-to-use interface to our services and data.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.