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Found 22 result(s)
The Archaeology Data Service supports research, learning and teaching with freely available, high quality and dependable digital resources. It does this by preserving digital data in the long term, and by promoting and disseminating a broad range of data in archaeology. The ADS promotes good practice in the use of digital data in archaeology, it provides technical advice to the research community, and supports the deployment of digital technologies.
Country
BABS include digital reproductions from the digitization of the Munich Digitisation CenterMunich Digitization Center/Digital Library of the Bavarian State Library including digital reproductions from copyright-free works from the BSB collections created by cooperation partners or service providers, such as digital copies from the The google-ProjectGoogle project; official publications of authorities, departments and agencies of the State of Bavaria according to the "Bavarian State Promulgation 2 December 2008 (Az.: B II 2-480-30)" on the delivery of official publications to libraries, the Promulgation Platform Bavaria (Verkündungsplattform), as well as voluntary deliveries of electronic publications of different (mainly Bavarian scientific) publishing houses and other publishers; scientifically relevant literature (open access publications and websites) of national and international origin in the Areas of Collection Emphasis of the BSB (history including classical studies, Eastern Europe, history of France and Italy, music, library science, book studies and information science) as well as Bavarica; electronic publications produced by the BSB specialist departments, especially those of the Center for Electronic Publishing (ZEP); local/regional/national licensed or purchased electronic publications
The Old Bailey Proceedings Online makes available a fully searchable, digitised collection of all surviving editions of the Old Bailey Proceedings from 1674 to 1913, and of the Ordinary of Newgate's Accounts between 1676 and 1772. It allows access to over 197,000 trials and biographical details of approximately 2,500 men and women executed at Tyburn, free of charge for non-commercial use. In addition to the text, accessible through both keyword and structured searching, this website provides digital images of all 190,000 original pages of the Proceedings, 4,000 pages of Ordinary's Accounts, advice on methods of searching this resource, information on the historical and legal background to the Old Bailey court and its Proceedings, and descriptions of published and manuscript materials relating to the trials covered. Contemporary maps, and images have also been provided.
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prometheus is a digital image archive for Art and Cultural Sciences. prometheus enables the convenient search for images on a common user interface within different image archives, variable databases from institutes, research facilities and museums.
The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital repository for the digital records of archaeological investigations. tDAR’s use, development, and maintenance are governed by Digital Antiquity, an organization dedicated to ensuring the long-term preservation of irreplaceable archaeological data and to broadening the access to these data.
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the nation's record keeper. Of all documents and materials created in the course of business conducted by the United States Federal government, only 1%-3% are so important for legal or historical reasons that they are kept by us forever. Those valuable records are preserved and are available to you, whether you want to see if they contain clues about your family’s history, need to prove a veteran’s military service, or are researching an historical topic that interests you.
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS): http://www.iobis.org/, see also: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset
You will find in the Access to Archival Databases (AAD) resource online access to records in a small selection of historic databases preserved permanently in NARA. Out of the nearly 200,000 data files in its holdings, NARA has selected approximately 475 of them for public searching through AAD. We selected these data because the records identify specific persons, geographic areas, organizations, and dates. The records cover a wide variety of civilian and military functions and have many genealogical, social, political, and economic research uses. AAD provides: Access to over 85 million historic electronic records created by more than 30 agencies of the U.S. federal government and from collections of donated historical materials. Both free-text and fielded searching options. The ability to retrieve, print, and download records with the specific information that you seek. Information to help you find and understand the records.
The National Digital Archive of Datasets (NDAD) provides access to archived datasets and documents from United Kingdom government departments which can be searched or browsed by subjects such as armed forces service or wills and death duties. Statistics and information gathered through census data as well as public records are used to compile the available datasets. All datasets are available to download and contain a record summary as well as custodial history, background on the source of the data and whether or not data may be added to the dataset in the future.
Content type(s)
RED is a collection of databases whose aim is to accumulate as much evidence as possible about reading experiences across the world. The search and browse facilities enable you to chart the reading tastes of individual readers as they travel to other countries, and consider how different environments may have affected their reading. You can track the readership of books issued in new editions for new audiences in different countries. Search results are displayed on an interactive map and linked to relevant records in national REDs. Each national RED offers a range of services to users, including profiles of readers, authors, and titles; tutorials on accessing and analysing evidence; and examples of how scholars have used the database to uncover patterns of reading.
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Arachne is the central object-database of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI). In 2004 the DAI and the Research Archive for Ancient Sculpture at the University of Cologne (FA) joined the effort to support Arachne as a tool for free internet-based research. Arachne's database design uses a model that builds on one of the most basic assumptions one can make about archaeology, classical archaeology or art history: all activities in these areas can most generally be described as contextualizing objects. Arachne tries to avoid the basic mistakes of earlier databases, which limited their object modeling to specific project-oriented aspects, thus creating separated containers of only a small number of objects. All objects inside Arachne share a general part of their object model, to which a more class-specific part is added that describes the specialised properties of a category of material like architecture or topography. Seen on the level of the general part, a powerful pool of material can be used for general information retrieval, whereas on the level of categories and properties, very specific structures can be displayed.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
Country
EGO examines 500 years of modern European history by transcending national, disciplinary and methodological boundaries. Ten thematic threads tie together processes of intercultural exchange whose influence extended beyond national and cultural borders. These range from religion, politics, science and law to art and music, as well as to the economy, technology and the military. EGO employs the newest research to present European transfer processes comprehensively in a way that is easy to understand. The articles link to images, sources, statistics, animated and interactive maps, and audio and visual clips. EGO thereby takes full advantage of the Internet's multi-media potential.
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The repository contains all digital data such as images, 3d models and analysis which were acquired in the Ancient Steelyards Project.
The Map Collection at the Faculty of Science CU (formerly the State Map Collection) belongs to one of the most extensive university map collections in Central and East Europe. The map collection is digitized as part of the Czech Ministry of Culture's project NAKI.
The Digital South Asia Library provides digital materials for reference and research on South Asia to scholars, public officials, business leaders, and other users. This program builds upon a two-year pilot project funded by the Association of Research Libraries' Global Resources Program with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
eLaborate is an online work environment in which scholars can upload scans, transcribe and annotate text, and publish the results as on online text edition which is freely available to all users. Short information about and a link to already published editions is presented on the page Editions under Published. Information about editions currently being prepared is posted on the page Ongoing projects. The eLaborate work environment for the creation and publication of online digital editions is developed by the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Although the institute considers itself primarily a research facility and does not maintain a public collection profile, Huygens ING actively maintains almost 200 digitally available resource collections.
Historic Environment Scotland was formed in October 2015 following the merger between Historic Scotland and The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. Historic Environment Scotland is the lead public body established to investigate, care for and promote Scotland’s historic environment. We lead and enable Scotland’s first historic environment strategy Our Place in Time, which sets out how our historic environment will be managed. It ensures our historic environment is cared for, valued and enhanced, both now and for future generations.
The Population Research in Sexual Minority Health (PRISM) Data Archive is a collaborative project of the Center for Population Research in LGBT Health and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR). The PRISM data archive project is a primary initiative of the Center. PRISM makes high quality datasets useful for analysis of issues affecting sexual and gender minority populations in the United States available researchers, scholars, educators and practitioners.