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Found 8 result(s)
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Jülich DATA is a registry service to index all research data created at or in the context of Forschungszentrum Jülich. As an institutionial repository, it may also be used for data and software publications.
MorphoSource is a data repository specialized for 3D representing physical objects used in research in education (e.g., from museum or laboratory collections). It allows researchers and museum collection staff to store and organize, share, and distribute their own 3d data. Furthermore any registered user can immediately search for and download 3d morphological data sets that have been made accessible through the consent of data authors.
Country
DataverseNO (https://dataverse.no) is a curated, FAIR-aligned national generic repository for open research data from all academic disciplines. DataverseNO commits to facilitate that published data remain accessible and (re)usable in a long-term perspective. The repository is owned and operated by UiT The Arctic University of Norway. DataverseNO accepts submissions from researchers primarily from Norwegian research institutions. Datasets in DataverseNO are grouped into institutional collections as well as special collections. The technical infrastructure of the repository is based on the open source application Dataverse (https://dataverse.org), which is developed by an international developer and user community led by Harvard University.
The US BRAIN Initiative archive for publishing and sharing neurophysiology data including electrophysiology, optophysiology, and behavioral time-series, and images from immunostaining experiments.
The DesignSafe Data Depot Repository (DDR) is the platform for curation and publication of datasets generated in the course of natural hazards research. The DDR is an open access data repository that enables data producers to safely store, share, organize, and describe research data, towards permanent publication, distribution, and impact evaluation. The DDR allows data consumers to discover, search for, access, and reuse published data in an effort to accelerate research discovery. It is a component of the DesignSafe cyberinfrastructure, which represents a comprehensive research environment that provides cloud-based tools to manage, analyze, curate, and publish critical data for research to understand the impacts of natural hazards. DesignSafe is part of the NSF-supported Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI), and aligns with its mission to provide the natural hazards research community with open access, shared-use scholarship, education, and community resources aimed at supporting civil and social infrastructure prior to, during, and following natural disasters. It serves a broad national and international audience of natural hazard researchers (both engineers and social scientists), students, practitioners, policy makers, as well as the general public. It has been in operation since 2016, and also provides access to legacy data dating from about 2005. These legacy data were generated as part of the NSF-supported Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES), a predecessor to NHERI. Legacy data and metadata belonging to NEES were transferred to the DDR for continuous preservation and access.
The Rotterdam Ophthalmic Data Repository (ROD-Rep) contains data sets related to ophthalmology that the Rotterdam Ophthalmic Institute has made freely available for researchers worldwide. This portal is an initiative of the Rotterdam Ophthalmic Institute, which is the research institute of the Rotterdam Eye Hospital. It provides the datasets from ophthalmic research (includes measurements such as visual fields and various imaging modalities, grades, etc.) for sharing and re-use to accelerate multi-disciplinary research, resulting in better ophthalmic care. The portal is the successor of the ORGIDS (or Open Rotterdam Glaucoma Imaging Data Sets site); which was an initiative of Koen Vermeer, Hans Lemij and Netty Dorrestijn and initial financial support was provided by Stichting Glaucoomfonds (The Netherlands).
The Tromsø Repository of Language and Linguistics (TROLLing) is a FAIR-aligned repository of linguistic data and statistical code. The archive is open access, which means that all information is available to everyone. All data are accompanied by searchable metadata that identify the researchers, the languages and linguistic phenomena involved, the statistical methods applied, and scholarly publications based on the data (where relevant). Linguists worldwide are invited to deposit data and statistical code used in their linguistic research. TROLLing is a special collection within DataverseNO (http://doi.org/10.17616/R3TV17), and C Centre within CLARIN (Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure, a networked federation of European data repositories; http://www.clarin.eu/), and harvested by their Virtual Language Observatory (VLO; https://vlo.clarin.eu/).
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.