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Found 568 result(s)
The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is designed to provide detailed infrared properties of selected Galactic and extragalactic sources. The sensitivity of the telescopic system is about one thousand times superior to that of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), since the ISO telescope enables integration of infrared flux from a source for several hours. Density waves in the interstellar medium, its role in star formation, the giant planets, asteroids, and comets of the solar system are among the objects of investigation. ISO was operated as an observatory with the majority of its observing time being distributed to the general astronomical community. One of the consequences of this is that the data set is not homogeneous, as would be expected from a survey. The observational data underwent sophisticated data processing, including validation and accuracy analysis. In total, the ISO Data Archive contains about 30,000 standard observations, 120,000 parallel, serendipity and calibration observations and 17,000 engineering measurements. In addition to the observational data products, the archive also contains satellite data, documentation, data of historic aspects and externally derived products, for a total of more than 400 GBytes stored on magnetic disks. The ISO Data Archive is constantly being improved both in contents and functionality throughout the Active Archive Phase, ending in December 2006.
STRING is a database of known and predicted protein interactions. The interactions include direct (physical) and indirect (functional) associations; they are derived from four sources: - Genomic Context - High-throughput Experiments - (Conserved) Coexpression - Previous Knowledge STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data from these sources for a large number of organisms, and transfers information between these organisms where applicable.
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BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
ScholarSphere is a secure repository service enabling the Penn State community to share its research and scholarly work with a worldwide audience. Faculty, staff, and students can use ScholarSphere to collect their work in one location and create a durable and citeable record of their papers, presentations, publications, data sets, or other scholarly creations. Through this service, Penn State researchers can also comply with grant-funding-agency requirements for sharing and managing research data.
Pubchem contains 3 databases. 1. PubChem BioAssay: The PubChem BioAssay Database contains bioactivity screens of chemical substances described in PubChem Substance. It provides searchable descriptions of each bioassay, including descriptions of the conditions and readouts specific to that screening procedure. 2. PubChem Compound: The PubChem Compound Database contains validated chemical depiction information provided to describe substances in PubChem Substance. Structures stored within PubChem Compounds are pre-clustered and cross-referenced by identity and similarity groups. 3. PubChem Substance. The PubChem Substance Database contains descriptions of samples, from a variety of sources, and links to biological screening results that are available in PubChem BioAssay. If the chemical contents of a sample are known, the description includes links to PubChem Compound.
VegBank is the vegetation plot database of the Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification. VegBank consists of three linked databases that contain the actual plot records, vegetation types recognized in the U.S. National Vegetation Classification and other vegetation types submitted by users, and all plant taxa recognized by ITIS/USDA as well as all other plant taxa recorded in plot records. Vegetation records, community types and plant taxa may be submitted to VegBank and may be subsequently searched, viewed, annotated, revised, interpreted, downloaded, and cited. VegBank receives its data from the VegBank community of users.
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The World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS) is a large database of structural (phonological, grammatical, lexical) properties of languages gathered from descriptive materials (such as reference grammars) by a team of 55 authors (many of them the leading authorities on the subject).
The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) leads in the design and implementation of unique multi-mission and multi-disciplinary data services and software to strategically advance NASA's solar-terrestrial program, to extend our science understanding of the structure, physics and dynamics of the Heliosphere of our Sun and to support the science missions of NASA's Heliophysics Great Observatory. Major SPDF efforts include multi-mission data services such as Heliophysics Data Portal (formerly VSPO), CDAWeb and CDAWeb Inside IDL,and OMNIWeb Plus (including COHOWeb, ATMOWeb, HelioWeb and CGM) , science planning and orbit services such as SSCWeb, data tools such as the CDF software and tools, and a range of other science and technology research efforts. The staff supporting SPDF includes scientists and information technology experts.
MIT’s implementation of OpenGeoportal is called MIT Geoweb. It was collaboratively developed as an open source, federated web application to discover, preview, and retrieve geospatial data from different repositories. Several of the country's leading universities and a state agency have formed a partnership to make thousands of geospatial data layers available through a single, open source interface. The application also incorporates some new innovative search techniques. Partners include Tufts, Harvard, MIT, Princeton, MassGIS, Stanford and UC Berkeley. The single interface is skinnable and may have slight differences in appearance based on the institution hosting the application. You can search for GIS data held in the MIT Geodata Repository and other local colleges.
A collection of data at Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) supporting research that helps people make more informed decisions and improves the quality of health care services. The portal contains U.S.Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) and other sources concerning cost, quality, accesibility and evaluation of healthcare and medical insurance.
bugwood.org is the host website of the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia (Formerly: Bugwood Network). The Center aims to develop, consolidate and disseminate information and programmes focused on invasive species, forest health, natural resources and agricultural management through technology development, programmes implementation, training, applied research and public awareness at state, regional, national and international levels. The site gives details of its products (Bugwood Image Database; Early Detection and Distribution Mapping and Bugwoodwiki). Details of its projects, services and personnel are provided. Users can also access image databases on Forestry, Insects, IPM, Invasive Species, Forest Pests, weed and Bark Beetle.
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The Economics & Business Data Center (EBDC) is a combined platform for empirical research in business administration and economics of the Ludwig–Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) and the Ifo Institute and aims at opening new fields for empirical research in business administration and economics. In this regard, the EBDC provides innovative datasets of German companies, containing both survey data of the Ifo Institute as well as external balance sheet data. Therefore, the tasks of the EBDC also include the procurement and administration of data sources for research and teaching, the central provision, updating and documentation of external databases, as well as the acquisition of corresponding support tools. Beyond that, the EBDC serves as a contact and central coordinator on licensing economic firm-level datasets for LMU’s Munich School of Management and LMU’s Department of Economics and supports researchers and guests of the LMU and the Ifo Institute on site. In the future, it will also conduct academic conferences on research with company data.
The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) is a component of NASAs Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). LP DAAC processes, archives, and distributes land data and products derived from the EOS sensors. Located just outside Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the LP DAAC handles data from three EOS instruments aboard two operational satellite platforms: ASTER and MODIS from Terra, and MODIS from Aqua. ASTER data are received, processed, distributed, and archived while MODIS land products are received, distributed, and archived.
The IMSR is a searchable online database of mouse strains, stocks, and mutant ES cell lines available worldwide, including inbred, mutant, and genetically engineered strains. The goal of the IMSR is to assist the international scientific community in locating and obtaining mouse resources for research. Note that the data content found in the IMSR is as supplied by strain repository holders. For each strain or cell line listed in the IMSR, users can obtain information about: Where that resource is available (Repository Site); What state(s) the resource is available as (e.g. live, cryopreserved embryo or germplasm, ES cells); Links to descriptive information about a strain or ES cell line; Links to mutant alleles carried by a strain or ES cell line; Links for ordering a strain or ES cell line from a Repository; Links for contacting the Repository to send a query
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With ARS - Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance in Germany - the infrastructure for a nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial resistance has been established, which covers both the inpatient medical care and the ambulatory care sector. This is intended to reliable data on the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in Germany and differential statements provided by structural features of the health care and by region are possible. ARS is designed as a laboratory-based surveillance system for continuous collection of resistance data from routine for the full range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Project participants and thus data suppliers are laboratories that analyze samples of medical facilities and doctors' offices microbiologically.
Chempound is a new generation repository architecture based on RDF, semantic dictionaries and linked data. It has been developed to hold any type of chemical object expressible in CML and is exemplified by crystallographic experiments and computational chemistry calculations. In both examples, the repository can hold >50k entries which can be searched by SPARQL endpoints and pre-indexing of key fields. The Chempound architecture is general and adaptable to other fields of data-rich science.
This Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database (Animal QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and trait mapping data (i.e. trait and genome location association data; collectively called "QTL data" on this site) on livestock animal species for easily locating and making comparisons within and between species. New database tools are continuely added to align the QTL and association data to other types of genome information, such as annotated genes, RH / SNP markers, and human genome maps. Besides the QTL data from species listed below, the QTLdb is open to house QTL/association date from other animal species where feasible. Note that the JAS along with other journals, now require that new QTL/association data be entered into a QTL database as part of their publication requirements.
>>>>!!!<<< As stated 2017-06-27 The website http://researchcompendia.org is no longer available; repository software is archived on github https://github.com/researchcompendia >>>!!!<<< The ResearchCompendia platform is an attempt to use the web to enhance the reproducibility and verifiability—and thus the reliability—of scientific research. we provide the tools to publish the "actual scholarship" by hosting data, code, and methods in a form that is accessible, trackable, and persistent. Some of our short term goals include: To expand and enhance the platform including adding executability for a greater variety of coding languages and frameworks, and enhancing output presentation. To expand usership and to test the ResearchCompendia model in a number of additional fields, including computational mathematics, statistics, and biostatistics. To pilot integration with existing scholarly platforms, enabling researchers to discover relevant Research Compendia websites when looking at online articles, code repositories, or data archives.
The RRUFF Project is creating a complete set of high quality spectral data from well characterized minerals and is developing the technology to share this information with the world. The collected data provides a standard for mineralogists, geoscientists, gemologists and the general public for the identification of minerals both on earth and for planetary exploration.Electron microprobe analysis is used to determine the chemistry of each mineral.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
TeachingWithData.org is a portal where faculty can find resources and ideas to reduce the challenges of bringing real data into post-secondary classes. It allows faculty to introduce and build students' quantitative reasoning abilities with readily available, user-friendly, data-driven teaching materials.