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Climate Data Record (CDR) is a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency and continuity to determine climate variability and change. The fundamental CDRs include sensor data, such as calibrated radiances and brightness temperatures, that scientists have improved and quality-controlled along with the data used to calibrate them. The thematic CDRs include geophysical variables derived from the fundamental CDRs, such as sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration, and they are specific to various disciplines.
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
TemperateReefBase is a resource for temperate reef researchers worldwide to use and contribute data. Unique in its role as a one-stop-shop for global temperate reef data, TemperateReefBase was initially established by IMAS in collaboration with the Kelp Ecology Ecosystem Network (KEEN). KEEN was instigated through a National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group which assembled experts from around the world to examine the impacts of global change on kelp-bed ecosystem worldwide. The group has assembled significant global data for kelps, other seaweeds and associated species including fishes, and has embarked on unprecedented global experiments and surveys in which identical experiments and surveys are being conducted at sites in kelp beds around the world to determine global trends and examine the capacity of kelps to respond to disturbance in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is an online discovery interface showcasing temperate reef data collected from around the globe. The portal aims to make this data freely and openly available for the benefit of marine and environmental science as a whole. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is hosted and maintained by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, Australia.
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
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The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
CESM is a fully-coupled, community, global climate model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states.
EOL’s platforms and instruments collect large and often unique data sets that must be validated, archived and made available to the research community. The goal of EOL data services is to advance science through delivering high-quality project data and metadata in ways that are as transparent, secure, and easily accessible as possible - today and into the future. By adhering to accepted standards in data formats and data services, EOL provides infrastructure to facilitate discovery and direct access to data and software from state-of-the-art commercial and locally-developed applications. EOL’s data services are committed to the highest standard of data stewardship from collection to validation to archival.
The CAS Data Catalog contains a variety of atmospheric and oceanic energy budget calculations derived from satellites and Reanalysis products.