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Found 302 result(s)
The BGS is a data-rich organisation with over 400 datasets in its care; including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives. Our data is managed by the National Geoscience Data Centre.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) is a public database that archives and disseminates genetic and protein interaction data from model organisms and humans. BioGRID is an online interaction repository with data compiled through comprehensive curation efforts. All interaction data are freely provided through our search index and available via download in a wide variety of standardized formats.
VADS is the online resource for visual arts. It has provided services to the academic community for 12 years and has built up a considerable portfolio of visual art collections comprising over 100,000 images that are freely available and copyright cleared for use in learning, teaching and research in the UK. VADS provides: expert guidance and help for digital projects in art education; resource development and hosting for art education; project management and consultancy for art education; leadership in the innovative use of ICT in education through its research and development activities. VADS offers advice and guidance to the visual arts research, teaching and learning communities on all aspects of digital resource management from funding, through delivery and use, to preservation.
UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot is the manually annotated and reviewed section of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). It is a high quality annotated and non-redundant protein sequence database, which brings together experimental results, computed features and scientific conclusions. Since 2002, it is maintained by the UniProt consortium and is accessible via the UniProt website.
Gramene is a platform for comparative genomic analysis of agriculturally important grasses, including maize, rice, sorghum, wheat and barley. Relationships between cereals are queried and displayed using controlled vocabularies (Gene, Plant, Trait, Environment, and Gramene Taxonomy) and web-based displays, including the Genes and Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) modules.
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
Chempound is a new generation repository architecture based on RDF, semantic dictionaries and linked data. It has been developed to hold any type of chemical object expressible in CML and is exemplified by crystallographic experiments and computational chemistry calculations. In both examples, the repository can hold >50k entries which can be searched by SPARQL endpoints and pre-indexing of key fields. The Chempound architecture is general and adaptable to other fields of data-rich science. The Chempound software is hosted at http://bitbucket.org/chempound and is available under the Apache License, Version 2.0
MGnify (formerly: EBI Metagenomics) offers an automated pipeline for the analysis and archiving of microbiome data to help determine the taxonomic diversity and functional & metabolic potential of environmental samples. Users can submit their own data for analysis or freely browse all of the analysed public datasets held within the repository. In addition, users can request analysis of any appropriate dataset within the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA). User-submitted or ENA-derived datasets can also be assembled on request, prior to analysis.
eCrystals - Southampton is the archive for Crystal Structures generated by the Southampton Chemical Crystallography Group and the EPSRC UK National Crystallography Service.
ForestPlots.net is a web-accessible secure repository for forest plot inventories in South America, Africa and Asia. The database includes plot geographical information; location, taxonomic information and diameter measurements of trees inside each plot; and participants in plot establishment and re-measurement, including principal investigators, field assistants, students.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) is a collaborative platform generating innovative resources and reliable evidence to inform the malaria community on the factors affecting the efficacy of antimalarial medicines. Access to data is provided through diverse Tools and Resources: WWARN Explorer, Molecular Surveyor K13 Methodology, Molecular Surveyor pfmdr1 & pfcrt, Molecular Surveyor dhfr & dhps.
The University has followed all of the children born in Aberdeen in 1921, 1936, and 1950-1956 as they grow and age. Collectively these groups are known as the ABERDEEN BIRTH COHORTS, and are a jewel in the crown of Scottish health research and have helped to advance our understanding of aging well. The Children of the 1950s study is a population-based resource for the study of biological and social influences on health across the life-course and between generations.
The Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS) are population based studies of individuals aged 65 years and over living in the community, including institutions, which is the only large multi-centred population-based study in the UK that has reached sufficient maturity. There are three main studies within the CFAS group. MRC CFAS, the original study began in 1989, with three of its sites providing a parent subset for the comparison two decades later with CFAS II (2008 onwards). Subsequently another CFAS study, CFAS Wales began in 2011.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
CRAWDAD is the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data, a wireless network data resource for the research community. This archive has the capacity to store wireless trace data from many contributing locations, and staff to develop better tools for collecting, anonymizing, and analyzing the data. We work with community leaders to ensure that the archive meets the needs of the research community.
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
The Data Catalogue is a service that allows University of Liverpool Researchers to create records of information about their finalised research data, and save those data in a secure online environment. The Data Catalogue provides a good means of making that data available in a structured way, in a form that can be discovered by both general search engines and academic search tools. There are two types of record that can be created in the Data Catalogue: A discovery-only record – in these cases, the research data may be held somewhere else but a record is provided to help people find it. A record is created that alerts users to the existence of the data, and provides a link to where those data are held. A discovery and data record – in these cases, a record is created to help people discover the data exist, and the data themselves are deposited into the Data Catalogue. This process creates a unique Digital Object identifier (DOI) which can be used in citations to the data.
The Spiral Digital Repository is the Imperial College London institutional open access repository. This system allows you, as an author, to make your research documents open access without incurring additional publication costs. When you self-archive a research document in Spiral it becomes free for anyone to read. You can upload copies of your publications to Spiral using Symplectic Elements. All deposited content becomes searchable online.
----<<<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out dated >>>>>----- The aim of FlyReactome, based in the Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, is to develop a curated repository for Drosophila melanogaster pathways and reactions. The information in this database is authored by biological researchers with expertise in their fields, maintained by the FlyReactome staff.