DataCite, re3data.org, and Databib Announce Collaboration

Databib and “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” are pleased to announce their plan to merge their two projects into one service that will be managed under the auspices of DataCite by the end of 2015. Their joint proposal to the DataCite General Assembly was approved today, in advance of the 3rd Plenary Meeting of the Research Data Alliance (RDA) in Dublin, Ireland.

The aim of this merger is to reduce duplication of effort and to better serve the research community with a single, sustainable registry of research data repositories that incorporates the best features of both projects.

re3data.org and Databib have agreed to the following five principles for successful cooperation:

  1. Openness: the metadata and the interfaces of the joint registry will be openly accessible. Metadata records will be made accessible under terms of the Creative Commons CC0 protocol;

  2. Optimal quality assurance: a two-stage workflow, with a first review of submissions by an international editorial board plus a second one for consistency, will guarantee the quality and currency of records;

  3. Development of innovative functionalities: cooperative development of new functionality for the joint registry and further integration with a global ecosystem of infrastructures that meet the needs of data-driven research and open science;

  4. Shared leadership: the joint registry will be lead by two representatives (one from each project) as equal partners;

  5. Sustainability: both projects will work together on a sustainable governance structure and a permanent infrastructure for the joint registry.

The joint registry will be operated under the name “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” with its editorial board retaining the name of Databib. Both registries have posted a Memorandum of Understanding on their respective websites and have exchanged metadata records in advance of fully merging their platforms and processes. By the end of 2015, the merged registry will become an imprint of DataCite and be included in its suite of services.

March 25, 2014

Dublin, Ireland; Karlsruhe, Germany; and West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

More Information:

Databib (http://databib.org) is a tool for helping researchers identify and locate online repositories of research data that has been online since April 2012. It was initially developed by Purdue University in collaboration with Penn State University and with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the United States. Its international, multidisciplinary editorial board identifies, catalogs, and curates a searchable index of research data repositories.

Since early 2012, “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” (http://re3data.org) has been indexing research data repositories. Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). re3data.org is funded from 2012 to 2015 by the German Research Foundation DFG.

DataCite (http://datacite.org) is a not-for-profit organization formed in London on December 1, 2009, with an aim to establish easier access to research data on the Internet, increase acceptance of research data as legitimate, citable contributions to the scholarly record, and support data archiving that will permit results to be verified and re-purposed for future study. To date, it has registered over 3 million datasets with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI).

re3data.org – from Funding to Growing

Good news: re3data.org has received another two year grant. The German Research Foundation (DFG) has extended the funding of re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories for two years.

Until the end of 2015 new functionalities will be implemented and more research data repositories will be indexed to offer researchers, funding organizations and libraries all over the world an easy-to-use overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape.

Currently the registry lists 634 research data repositories from around the world covering all academic disciplines. 586 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org schema. An innovative icon system helps researchers to easily identify an adequate research data repository for the storage of their research data.

At the moment our developers are working on a workflow system that will allow repository operators to edit the entries of their research data infrastructure.

Already in December 2013 the re3data.org project team released the version 2.1 of the comprehensive “Schema for the Description of Research Data Repositories” (http://doi.org/10.2312/re3.004).

More and more funders and research institutions recommend the use of re3data.org. Two examples from the past months: re3data.org is recommended in the European Commission’s “Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020″ (PDF) and, on a national level, in the University Bielefeld’s “Resolution on Research Data Management“.

Since early 2012 re3data.org has been indexing research data repositories. Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

BioSharing and re3data.org cooperate on the collection and description of data repositories

Researchers need infrastructures that ensure a maximum of accessibility, stability and reliability in terms of working with and sharing data. Such infrastructures are being called research data repositories. Today BioSharing and re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories have agreed, in a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), to map and describe the emerging data repository landscape in a joint effort.

The cooperation between the partners will help to build a comprehensive overview of data repositories worldwide, to (i) assist users in the navigation and search of both services, and (ii) maximize cross-references and exchange of records between the two services. This cooperation aims at developing a vital ecosystem of research data repositories and at maximizing the accessibility of research data for scholarship and society.

BioSharing

BioSharing is a registry of (i) community-developed, data and metadata reporting standards and (ii) databases linked to (iii) policies related to data preservation, management and sharing policies by funders and regulators in the life sciences (broadly covering biological, natural and biomedical sciences). BioSharing’s goal is to ensure these three type of resources are informative, discoverable and cross-linked, where appropriate, progressively adding metrics to monitor their use, development, evolution and integration. The description of the standards for describing and sharing life science experiments (minimal information checklists, terminologies and exchange formats) also leverages on the MIBBI portal – now part of this larger effort – and links to the entries in the BioPortal. Standards are progressively linked to public repositories described according to the bioDBcore community-defined description of their core attributes, leveraging on a collaboration with Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and the DATABASE journals. Website: http://www.biosharing.org

re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories provides an overview on existing research data repositories. Since 2012 re3data.org has indexed research data repositories offering researchers, funding organizations, libraries and publishers an overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape. Currently re3data.org lists over 600 research data repositories.  Around 400 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary. An innovative icon system helps researchers to easily identify an adequate research data repository for the storage of their research data. re3data.org is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Website: http://www.re3data.org

In the MoU both partners agree that for the life science communities, BioSharing will be the central submission point and service for data repositories, reporting standards and policies. For all other sciences, re3data.org will be the central submission point and service for data repositories.

To this purpose and as a first step of the cooperation re3data.org will integrate the database records from BioSharing, tracking provenance and progressively working together to ensure complementarity and harmonization of the metadata fields and icons.

Beyond that BioSharing and re3data.org will intensify their dialogue on common approaches and standards in the research data repository area.

Oxford, UK and Karlsruhe, Germany

November 2013

Memorandum of Understanding between OpenAIRE and re3data.org

October 2013 – Athens and Karlsruhe

In order to foster the sharing of research data in science and humanities, digital research infrastructures need to be in place to ensure the permanent accessibility and re-use of research data. A number of these infrastructures, often referred to as research data repositories, have been, or are in the process of, being developed  at both institutional and discipline levels.

 

With this Memorandum of Understanding, OpenAIRE and re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories – agree to work jointly to facilitate research data registration, discovery, access and re-use. By their joint effort, the two partners will contribute to the development of a vital data-sharing ecosystem, that supports scientists in their efforts to meet the growing demand of Open Science.

 

re3data.org provides an overview of existing research data repositories. Since 2012, re3data.org has indexed research data repositories offering researchers, funding organizations, libraries and publishers an overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape. An innovative icon system helps researchers to easily identify a suitable research data repository for the storage of their research data. re3data.org is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

 

OpenAIRE_logo_high_resolutionOpenAIRE is an open access infrastructure, which promotes open research and measures the impact of funding streams. This is done both through its Europe-wide network of National Open Access Desks and via services for data deposit and discovery through its data repository ZENODO. Moreover, through harvesting repositories and mining techniques OpenAIRE infers links between publications, research funding and research data. This enables discovery and re-use, as well as monitoring and the ability to provide metrics. OpenAIREplus is funded by the EC 7th Framework Programme.

 

As a first step re3data.org and OpenAIREplus will exchange metadata to enable the easy identification of appropriate research data repositories for the access and storage of research data. OpenAIREplus will integrate data repositories indexed in the re3data.org registry and in turn return information about usage statistics for datasets and inferred links between data and publications. Moreover OpenAIREplus and re3data.org will intensify their dialogue on best-practices and possible standards and guidelines for the emerging research data repository landscape.

 

October 2013, Berlin

 

re3data.org: new repositories and functionalities

We’ve been busy during the summertime. The number of indexed research data repositories has grown significantly. Currently re3data.org lists 611 research data repositories. 398 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary.

We’ve also improved the functionalities and the design of the registry. It’s now possible to browse through the indexed data repositories (1. by subject, 2. by content type and 3. by country). Furthermore we re-designed the detail view of a repository by splitting all information into the following categories: general, institutions, policies and miscellaneous. Check out the example of DRYAD.

Beyond that, re3data.org is now also part of Nature’s Scientific Data’s deposition policy. The policy states that:

“We also encourage life science and biomedical repositories and communities to register their services and reporting standards at BioSharing. Physics, astrophysics, astronomy and geoscience databases should be registered with re3data.org.”

Currently BioSharing and re3data.org are in the process of finalizing an agreement to ensure complementarity between their records. BioSharing offers a catalogue of databases in the life sciences. These databases are described according to the BioDBcore guidelines.

re3data.org was mentioned in an report on “Open Data Access Policies and Strategies in the European Research Area and Beyond” for the European Commission. Furthermore re3data.org was referenced in journal policies (e.g. Copernicus Publications) and repository guidelines (e.g. PREPARDE).

We are happy to see that re3data.org is on its way to become the useful tool for researchers, research data repository operators, publishers and funders, that we planned it to be. We’re not finished yet and will continue to improve our registry also thanks to your feedback that is more appreciated than ever.

re3data.org is moving forward

We appreciate all feedback that we received since our launch in May 2013. Thanks for all the tweets and blog posts! Beside comments and suggestions we also received interesting requests for cooperation that we try to realize to enhance our registry. Our to-do list is now filled with numerous tasks and we are working hard to improve the functionalities of re3data.org.

We were also very pleased that an Editorial on Open Access in Nature mentioned our registry (doi:10.1038/498005a).

It is great that some publishers like Copernicus Publications, PeerJ and Springer refer to re3data.org in their Editorial Policies as a tool for the easy identification of appropriate research data repositories to store data. This confirms our assumption that researchers need a service such as re3data.org.

Copernicus Publications:

“Please find your appropriate data repository in the Registry for Research Data Repositories re3data.org.”

Springer:

“Appropriate repositories from all academic disciplines for the storage of data sets can be found at re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories.”

The number of indexed research data repositories increases steadily: currently re3data.org lists 400 research data repositories and counting. 288 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary.

If you find a research data repository missing from our list, please use our online form. The re3data.org team reviews and lists the proposed repositories in the registry.

re3data.org launched

An increasing number of universities and research organisations are starting to build research data repositories to allow permanent access in a trustworthy environment to data sets resulting from research at their institutions. Due to varying disciplinary requirements, the landscape of research data repositories is very heterogeneous. This makes it difficult for researchers, funding bodies, publishers, and scholarly institutions to select an appropriate repository for storage of research data or to search for data.

The re3data.org registry allows the easy identification of appropriate research data repositories, both for data producers and users. The registry covers research data repositories from all academic disciplines. Information icons display the principal attributes of a repository, allowing users to identify the functionalities and qualities of a data repository. These attributes can be used for multi-faceted searches, for instance to find a repository for geoscience data using a Creative Commons licence.

By April 2013, 338 research data repositories were indexed in re3data.org. 171 of these are described by a comprehensive vocabulary, which was developed by involving the data repository community (http://doi.org/kv3).

The re3data.org search at can be found at: http://service.re3data.org/search
The information icons are explained at: http://www.re3data.org/faq

Repository operators can suggest their infrastructures to be listed in re3data.org via a simple application form: http://www.re3data.org/suggest The re3data.org team reviews and then lists the proposed repositories in the registry. A repository is indexed when the minimum requirements are met, i.e. mode of access to the data and repository, as well as the terms of use must be clearly explained on the repository pages.

re3data.org is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). re3data.org cooperates with the German Initiative for Network Information (DINI). The three partners with their expertise in information infrastructures guarantee the sustainability of the registry in the future.

Detailed information can be found in the following PeerJ preprint: http://doi.org/mnn

Session at the “5th Congress Library and Information” in Leipzig

re3data.org will host a session on research data management at the “5th Congress Library and Information” in Leipzig, Germany.

The session “Research Data Repositories – Infrastructures for the Permanent Access to Research Data” will focus on the current development of the re3data.org registry as well as on institutional and disciplinary strategies of research data management.

Speakers from Berlin School of Library and Information Science, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and PANGAEA – Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science and will give a broad overview of the data management landscape.

The session will take place on 11th March 2013, 9:00 AM – 11:30 AM at the Congress Centre Leipzig. The Conference language will be German.

Update, 2013-03-17: The presentation slides are online:

Symposium on Research Data Infrastructures, 22 January 2013

re3data.org is co-organiser of the symposium “Research Data Infrastructure (FDI 2013)”. The symposium will take place on 22 January 2013 at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, Germany.

The symposium FDI 2013 deals with the challenges and opportunities of the ever-growing amount of digital research data. The program centres on research data infrastructures. In talks and workshops organisational, financial, technological and legal aspects of research data infrastructures and data management services will be addressed.

The working language of the symposium will be German. The agenda is online. A registration is required.

The symposium is jointly organised by the DFG-funded projects Radieschen,
re3data.org, KomFor, EWIG und BoKeLa.