DataCite to Manage and Develop re3data.org

The DataCite General Assembly met at the British Library last week and approved the inclusion of the re3data.org registry of research data repositories into the portfolio of services that are managed by the DataCite organization.

DataCite and re3data.orgOver 1,200 data repositories have been indexed by re3data.org and can be searched and accessed at its website or by using its API. Bringing this service together with DataCite, who mints and manages Digital Object Identifiers for datasets, will yield new opportunities to explore in combining a registry of data repositories with information about persisted datasets to create new value for the research community.

A new re3data.org Working Group within DataCite will be co-chaired by Michael Witt and Frank Scholze, who will also lead the editorial board that evaluates new additions and maintains the records in the registry. Members of the working group will be appointed by the DataCite Executive Board and include equal participation from the original re3data.org project partners and DataCite member institutions. The working group will convene in September to migrate the operation of re3data.org to DataCite at the end of the year. Infrastructure and technical support for re3data.org will continue to be provided by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

Project partners in re3data.org include the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Purdue University, and KIT. The work of re3data.org has been funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in Germany and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the United States.

Merger of Databib and re3data.org, first version of API available

On the occasion of the Research Data Alliance’s Fifth Plenary Meeting, we are pleased to report progress in the consolidation of the Databib and re3data.org initiatives into a shared registry and website and to announce the availability of an Application Programming Interface (API) to enable machine access to the merged registry.

The registry and collective effort are now known as re3data.org, while Databib has become the name of the editorial board of volunteers who review and enhance records for inclusion in the registry. The consolidated registry contains information for more than 1,130 data repositories that are accessed by over 5,000 unique visitors each month. On average, 10 new repositories are added every week.

A new REST-API is currently being beta tested that provides the full list of repositories and enables retrieval of full, structured records describing individual repositories. The interface aims to implement a RESTful application architecture. In line with the HATEOAS concept, the data can be discovered automatically and retrieved in XML by following hypermedia links. The interface, currently being beta, supports versioning and will be extended with future requirements. The schema and developer documentation for the API are available online. Feedback on the API and suggestions for new functionality for the API specification are welcomed by sending email to info@re3data.org.

re3data-orgAbout re3data.org

re3data.org strives offers reliable orientation in the heterogeneous landscape of research data repositories and provides a point of integration with other components of global cyberinfrastructure and “data fabric”.

Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the Purdue University Libraries and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

The work of re3data.org has been funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in Germany and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the United States.

re3data.org is transitioning to become an imprint of DataCite and to be included in its suite of services by the end of 2015.

Version 2.2 of the Schema for the Description of Research Data Repositories published

 Schema for the description of research data repositories. Version 2.2Following a successful RFC period we are happy to announce the publication of version 2.2 of the “Schema for the Description of Research Data Repositories”.

We managed to integrate most of the ideas that we received. In version 2.2 new properties and controlled vocabularies were added and some definitions changed.

We thank all contributors for their comments, suggestions and ideas improving the schema and re3data.org.

Vierkant, P., Spier, S., Ruecknagel, J., Pampel, H., Fritze, F., Gundlach, J., Fichtmüller, D., Kindling, M., Kirchhoff, A., Göbelbecker, H.-J., Klump, J., Kloska, G., Reuter, E., Semrau, A., Schnepf, E., Skarupianski, M., Bertelmann, R., Schirmbacher, P., Scholze, F., Kramer, C., Witt, M., Fuchs, C., Ulrich, R. (2014): Description of Research Data Repositories Version 2.2 , 27 p. DOI: http://doi.org/10.2312/re3.006

Over 1,000 research data repositories indexed in re3data.org

In August 2012 re3data.org – the Registry of Research Data Repositories went online with 23 entries. Two years later the registry provides researchers, funding organisations, libraries and publishers with over 1,000 listed research data repositories from all over the world making it the largest and most comprehensive online catalog of research data repositories on the web. re3data.org provides detailed information about the research data repositories, and its distinctive icons help researchers easily identify relevant repositories for accessing and depositing data sets.

To more than 5,000 unique visitors per month re3data.org offers reliable orientation in the heterogeneous landscape of research data repositories. An average of 10 repositories are added to the registry every week. The latest indexed data infrastructure is the new CERN Open Data Portal.

The project partners from the US and Germany are very happy about the steady growth and the success of the project.

Growth of re3data.org

re3data.org encourages funders, libraries and publishers to refer to re3data.org in their policies and guidelines as the primary source for identifying research data repositories.

Initial partners in re3data.org are the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

This march re3data.org started a process of merging with Databib, a similar initative at the University Purdue (West Lafayette, Indiana, USA). The aim of this cooperation is to serve the research community with a single, sustainable registry of research data repositories that incorporates the best features of both initiatives.

All records from Databib are now integrated in re3data.org. The process of merging will be finalised in the next months. By the end of 2015, re3data.org will become an imprint of DataCite and be included in its suite of services.

The work of re3data.org is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in Germany and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the United States.

Request for Comments: Schema for the Description of Research Data Repositories Version 2.2

re3data.org, the Registry of Research Data Repositories, has identified and described over 900 data repositories from around the world covering all academic disciplines. Data repositories are currently described in the registry using the Description of Research Data Repositories Version 2.1 metadata schema that was published in December 2013.

Schema for the Description of Research Data Repositories - RFC Version 2.2An update to the schema, Version 2.2, has been proposed based on experience and community input. Further review and comments are requested.

The draft schema can be accessed at http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11748.

The new version includes additional properties and controlled terms as well as new and revised definitions.

Comments can be submitted before October 20, 2014, by commenting on this blog entry or by emailing info [@] re3data.org. Input from the community is appreciated and will be incorporated into the final release, which is expected in December 2014.

Thank you for your contribution!

Wikipedia Entry for re3data.org

As of May 11th, you can find an article with basic information about re3data.org in the English version of Wikipedia. Feel free to link it to other Wikipedia articles on research data management or otherwise use it as a reference.

Growth of re3data.org

Looking back over two years of development and growth of re3data.org, we began in August 2012 with 23 entries. At the time of our official launch, 171 research data repositories had been cataloged. By December 2013, the team had indexed 387 repositories.

Growth of re3data.orgWith the merger of Databib and re3data.org, we have become the most comprehensive registry of research data repositories with nearly 650 repositories represented worldwide. An average of 10 repositories are added to our registry every week. By improving our internal workflows and integrating Databib’s international board of editors, growth and quality are expected to continue as we anticipated reaching 1,000 repositories indexed before the end of the year.

DataCite, re3data.org, and Databib Announce Collaboration

Databib and “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” are pleased to announce their plan to merge their two projects into one service that will be managed under the auspices of DataCite by the end of 2015. Their joint proposal to the DataCite General Assembly was approved today, in advance of the 3rd Plenary Meeting of the Research Data Alliance (RDA) in Dublin, Ireland.

The aim of this merger is to reduce duplication of effort and to better serve the research community with a single, sustainable registry of research data repositories that incorporates the best features of both projects.

re3data.org and Databib have agreed to the following five principles for successful cooperation:

  1. Openness: the metadata and the interfaces of the joint registry will be openly accessible. Metadata records will be made accessible under terms of the Creative Commons CC0 protocol;

  2. Optimal quality assurance: a two-stage workflow, with a first review of submissions by an international editorial board plus a second one for consistency, will guarantee the quality and currency of records;

  3. Development of innovative functionalities: cooperative development of new functionality for the joint registry and further integration with a global ecosystem of infrastructures that meet the needs of data-driven research and open science;

  4. Shared leadership: the joint registry will be lead by two representatives (one from each project) as equal partners;

  5. Sustainability: both projects will work together on a sustainable governance structure and a permanent infrastructure for the joint registry.

The joint registry will be operated under the name “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” with its editorial board retaining the name of Databib. Both registries have posted a Memorandum of Understanding on their respective websites and have exchanged metadata records in advance of fully merging their platforms and processes. By the end of 2015, the merged registry will become an imprint of DataCite and be included in its suite of services.

March 25, 2014

Dublin, Ireland; Karlsruhe, Germany; and West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

More Information:

Databib (http://databib.org) is a tool for helping researchers identify and locate online repositories of research data that has been online since April 2012. It was initially developed by Purdue University in collaboration with Penn State University and with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the United States. Its international, multidisciplinary editorial board identifies, catalogs, and curates a searchable index of research data repositories.

Since early 2012, “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” (http://re3data.org) has been indexing research data repositories. Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). re3data.org is funded from 2012 to 2015 by the German Research Foundation DFG.

DataCite (http://datacite.org) is a not-for-profit organization formed in London on December 1, 2009, with an aim to establish easier access to research data on the Internet, increase acceptance of research data as legitimate, citable contributions to the scholarly record, and support data archiving that will permit results to be verified and re-purposed for future study. To date, it has registered over 3 million datasets with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI).

re3data.org – from Funding to Growing

Good news: re3data.org has received another two year grant. The German Research Foundation (DFG) has extended the funding of re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories for two years.

Until the end of 2015 new functionalities will be implemented and more research data repositories will be indexed to offer researchers, funding organizations and libraries all over the world an easy-to-use overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape.

Currently the registry lists 634 research data repositories from around the world covering all academic disciplines. 586 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org schema. An innovative icon system helps researchers to easily identify an adequate research data repository for the storage of their research data.

At the moment our developers are working on a workflow system that will allow repository operators to edit the entries of their research data infrastructure.

Already in December 2013 the re3data.org project team released the version 2.1 of the comprehensive “Schema for the Description of Research Data Repositories” (http://doi.org/10.2312/re3.004).

More and more funders and research institutions recommend the use of re3data.org. Two examples from the past months: re3data.org is recommended in the European Commission’s “Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020″ (PDF) and, on a national level, in the University Bielefeld’s “Resolution on Research Data Management“.

Since early 2012 re3data.org has been indexing research data repositories. Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

BioSharing and re3data.org cooperate on the collection and description of data repositories

Researchers need infrastructures that ensure a maximum of accessibility, stability and reliability in terms of working with and sharing data. Such infrastructures are being called research data repositories. Today BioSharing and re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories have agreed, in a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), to map and describe the emerging data repository landscape in a joint effort.

The cooperation between the partners will help to build a comprehensive overview of data repositories worldwide, to (i) assist users in the navigation and search of both services, and (ii) maximize cross-references and exchange of records between the two services. This cooperation aims at developing a vital ecosystem of research data repositories and at maximizing the accessibility of research data for scholarship and society.

BioSharing

BioSharing is a registry of (i) community-developed, data and metadata reporting standards and (ii) databases linked to (iii) policies related to data preservation, management and sharing policies by funders and regulators in the life sciences (broadly covering biological, natural and biomedical sciences). BioSharing’s goal is to ensure these three type of resources are informative, discoverable and cross-linked, where appropriate, progressively adding metrics to monitor their use, development, evolution and integration. The description of the standards for describing and sharing life science experiments (minimal information checklists, terminologies and exchange formats) also leverages on the MIBBI portal – now part of this larger effort – and links to the entries in the BioPortal. Standards are progressively linked to public repositories described according to the bioDBcore community-defined description of their core attributes, leveraging on a collaboration with Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and the DATABASE journals. Website: http://www.biosharing.org

re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories provides an overview on existing research data repositories. Since 2012 re3data.org has indexed research data repositories offering researchers, funding organizations, libraries and publishers an overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape. Currently re3data.org lists over 600 research data repositories.  Around 400 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary. An innovative icon system helps researchers to easily identify an adequate research data repository for the storage of their research data. re3data.org is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Website: http://www.re3data.org

In the MoU both partners agree that for the life science communities, BioSharing will be the central submission point and service for data repositories, reporting standards and policies. For all other sciences, re3data.org will be the central submission point and service for data repositories.

To this purpose and as a first step of the cooperation re3data.org will integrate the database records from BioSharing, tracking provenance and progressively working together to ensure complementarity and harmonization of the metadata fields and icons.

Beyond that BioSharing and re3data.org will intensify their dialogue on common approaches and standards in the research data repository area.

Oxford, UK and Karlsruhe, Germany

November 2013