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Found 27 result(s)
VegBank is the vegetation plot database of the Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification. VegBank consists of three linked databases that contain the actual plot records, vegetation types recognized in the U.S. National Vegetation Classification and other vegetation types submitted by users, and all plant taxa recognized by ITIS/USDA as well as all other plant taxa recorded in plot records. Vegetation records, community types and plant taxa may be submitted to VegBank and may be subsequently searched, viewed, annotated, revised, interpreted, downloaded, and cited. VegBank receives its data from the VegBank community of users.
The National Vegetation Survey (NVS) Databank is a physical archive and electronic databank containing records of over 9104,000 vegetation survey plots - including data from over 24,000 permanent plots in New Zealand. The data can be explored online and requested for download. The NVS Databank provides data spanning more than 60 years of indigenous and exotic plant plot records from throughout New Zealand's terrestrial ecosystems. The physical archive includes plot sheets, maps, and photographs from many years of vegetation surveys. Purpose-built software for entering, validating and summarising data is available. NVS is accorded the status of a Nationally Significant database and upkeep and maintenance is supported by Core funding for Crown Research Institutes from the NZ Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.
This is a database for vegetation data from West Africa, i.e. phytosociological and dendrometric relevés as well as floristic inventories. The West African Vegetation Database has been developed in the framework of the projects “Sustainable Use of Natural Vegetation in West Africa” (SUN, http://www.sunproject.dk/) and “Biodiversity Transect Analysis in Africa” (BIOTA, http://www.biota-africa.org/).
The Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) allows ecosystem scientists to integrate data across disciplines. Data topics include plants and animals, vegetation, terrestrial ecosystem, ecological dynamics, fresh water and estuarine, land surface and soils, agriculture, oceans and coasts, climate, human-nature interactions, and energy, water and gas.
ForestPlots.net is a web-accessible secure repository for forest plot inventories in South America, Africa and Asia. The database includes plot geographical information; location, taxonomic information and diameter measurements of trees inside each plot; and participants in plot establishment and re-measurement, including principal investigators, field assistants, students.
This database is a global archive and describes plant traits from throughout the globe. TRY is a network of vegetation scientists headed by DIVERSITAS, IGBP, iDiv, the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry and an international Advisory Board. About half of the data are geo-referenced, providing a global coverage of more than 8000 measurement sites.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
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In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32, www.tr32.de), funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
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The Australian SuperSite Network Data Portal presents data on vegetation, fauna, soil, water, daily meteorology and daily recorded soundscapes from 10 SuperSites across a diverse range of biomes, including tropical rainforest, grassland and savanna; wet and dry sclerophyll forest and woodland; and semi-arid grassland, woodland and savanna.
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The company RapidEye AG of Brandenburg brought on 29 August 2008 five satellites into orbit that can be aligned within a day to any point on Earth. The data are interesting for a number of large and small companies for applications from harvest planning to assessment of insurance claims case of natural disasters. Via the Rapid Eye Science Archive (RESA) science users can receive, free of charge, optical image data of the RapidEye satellite fleet. Imagery is allocated based on a proposal to be submitted via the RESA Portal which will be evaluated by independent experts.
In its 10-year tenure, NCED has made major contributions to the growth of Earth-Surface Dynamics (ESD) through direct research in three Integrated Programs (IP) of Streams, Watersheds and Deltas. These contributions include: Establishment of experimental geomorphology and stratigraphy as a major source of insight in ESD, Integration of quantitative methods from engineering, physics, and applied math into ESD, Advances in the coupling of life, especially vegetation, and landscape dynamics, Integration of a variety of novel methods from stochastic hydrology, including nonlocal transport and multifractal spatial signatures, into ESD, Advances in providing the scientific basis for restoring streams, and Integration of subsurface structure and stratigraphic records into understanding present-day delta dynamics. All data created or compiled by NCED-funded scientists is archived here.
Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and provides access to the largest natural resource information system in the world. NRCS has soil maps and data available online for more than 95 percent of the nation’s counties and anticipates having 100 percent in the near future. The site is updated and maintained online as the single authoritative source of soil survey information.
The Research Data Archive (RDA) at NCAR contains a large and diverse collection of meteorological and oceanographic observations, operational and reanalysis model outputs, and remote sensing datasets to support atmospheric and geosciences research, along with ancillary datasets, such as topography/bathymetry, vegetation, and land use.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
The U.S. Antarctic Program Data Center (USAP-DC) supports investigators funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF http://www.nsf.gov/ ) in documenting, preserving, and disseminating their research results. We register datasets in the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD http://gcmd.nasa.gov/portals/amd/ ) to comply with the Antarctic Treaty (http://www.ats.aq/e/ats.htm ); facilitate submission of datasets to long-term archives; and represent the U.S. in Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR http://www.scar.org/data-products/scadm ) activities. USAP-DC is a member of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA http://www.iedadata.org/ ) and a partner in the Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium (A2DC http://www.a2dc.org/ ).
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This study assessed differences in avian biodiversity across different forest age-classes, including mature stands (> 100 years), in a managed, mixed-species eucalypt forest located in Gippsland, south-eastern Australia. Avian surveys and detailed habitat measurements were initially carried out in 50 two hectare stands ranging in age from 100 years. Extensive wildfire which occurred during the study reduced the number of sites to 28 (seven in each of four age classes) upon which analyses and inferences were made. Mature vegetation (> 100 years) had the greatest richness, abundance and biomass of birds. Key ecological resources, such as tree-hollows for nesting, generally occurred mostly in stands > 60 years. There were quantum increases in all measures of avian biodiversity in mature stands (> 100 years). The visualisation of the survey data is part of an interoperable web-GIS maintained by the Centre for eResearch and Digital Innovation (CeRDI) at Federation University Australia (FedUni).
The ASTER Project consists of two parts, each having a Japanese and a U.S. component. Mission operations are split between Japan Space Systems (J-spacesystems) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the U.S. J-spacesystems oversees monitoring instrument performance and health, developing the daily schedule command sequence, processing Level 0 data to Level 1, and providing higher level data processing, archiving, and distribution. The JPL ASTER project provides scheduling support for U.S. investigators, calibration and validation of the instrument and data products, coordinating the U.S. Science Team, and maintaining the science algorithms. The joint Japan/U.S. ASTER Science Team has about 40 scientists and researchers. Data access via NASA Reverb, ASTER Japan site, earth explorer, GloVis,GDEx and LP DAAC. See here http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/data.asp . In Addition data are availabe through the newly implemented ASTER Volcano archive (AVA) http://ava.jpl.nasa.gov/ .
Within WASCAL a large number of heterogeneous data are collected. These data are mainly coming from different initiated research activities within WASCAL (Core Research Program, Graduate School Program) from the hydrological-meteorological, remote sensing, biodiversity and socio economic observation networks within WASCAL, and from the activities of the WASCAL Competence Center in Ouagadougou, Burkina-Faso.
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a new data archive for Earth and environmental science data. ESS-DIVE is funded by the Data Management program within the Climate and Environmental Science Division under the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research program (BER), and is maintained by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. ESS-DIVE will archive and publicly share data obtained from observational, experimental, and modeling research that is funded by the DOE’s Office of Science under its Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) programs within the Environmental Systems Science (ESS) activity. ESS-DIVE will include CDIAC that closed September 30, 2017. >>>!!!<<< March 2018: Some of the CDIAC data has not yet been transferred to ESS-DIVE. Click here http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ to check the CDIAC transition website. >>>!!!<<< The new archive for the CDIAC data will be ESS-DIVE except in the specific cases mentioned below: The Oceanic Trace Gas data have been transitioned to the new Ocean Carbon Data System (OCADS) operated by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) at https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/ocads/. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) data have been transitioned to Caltech (http://tccondata.org/). HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) data are transitioning to the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory (https://www.eol.ucar.edu/data-software). - ESS-DIVE launched in July 2017, and is currently in the process of implementing a new archive designed to provide long-term stewardship and use of data from observational, experimental and modeling activities in the DOE in the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Programs in the Environmental System Science (ESS) activity.
The Andrews Forest is a place of inquiry. Our mission is to support research on forests, streams, and watersheds, and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, natural resource management, and the humanities. Our place and our work are administered cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon State University, and the Willamette National Forest. First established in 1948 as an US Forest Service Experimental Forest, the H.J. Andrews is a 16,000-acre ecological research site in Oregon's beautiful western Cascades Mountains. The landscape is home to iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth forests of Cedar and Hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas Firs; steep terrain; and fast, cold-running streams. In 1980 the Andrews became a charter member of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program.
The GTN-P database is an object-related database open for a diverse range of data. Because of the complexity of the PAGE21 project, data provided in the GTN-P management system are extremely diverse, ranging from active-layer thickness measurements once per year to flux measurement every second and everthing else in between. The data can be assigned to two broad categories: Quantitative data which is all data that can be measured numerically. Quantitative data comprise all in situ measurements, i.e. permafrost temperatures and active layer thickness (mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, soil temperature profiles). Qualitative data (knowledge products) are observations not based on measurements, such as observations on soils, vegetation, relief, etc.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
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The Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) pursues multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary work to advance understanding of temperate marine, Southern Ocean, and Antarctic environments. IMAS research is characterised as innovative, relevant, and globally distinctive. Education at IMAS delivers world class programs, resulting in highly trained graduates who serve the needs of academic institutions, industry, government, and the community. IMAS is naturally advantaged by its Southern Ocean location proximal to Antarctica, and hosts one of the world's largest critical masses of marine and Antarctic researchers. IMAS also operate facilities and host data sets of national and global interest and to the benefit of the community. The guiding framework of IMAS is that all data that are not commercial-in-confidence or restricted by legislation or agreement are owned by the University on behalf of the community or Commonwealth, are hosted by an organisation, and are shared with researchers for analysis and interpretation. IMAS is committed to the concept of Open Data. The IMAS Data Portal is an online interface showcasing the IMAS metadata catalogue and all available IMAS data. The portal aims to make IMAS data freely and openly available for the benefit of Australian marine and environmental science as a whole.