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Found 25 result(s)
The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database supports the use of the mouse as a model system of hereditary cancer by providing electronic access to: Information on endogenous spontaneous and induced tumors in mice, including tumor frequency & latency data, Information on genetically defined mice (inbred, hybrid, mutant, and genetically engineered strains of mice) in which tumors arise, Information on genetic factors associated with tumor susceptibility in mice and somatic genetic-mutations observed in the tumors, Tumor pathology reports and images, References, supporting MTB data and Links to other online resources for cancer.
Patients-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) mouse models are an important oncology research platform to study tumor evolution, drug response and personalised medicine approaches.
The repository is no longer available. <<<!!!<<< CCRIS information is migrated to PubChem (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pcsubstance?term=%22Chemical%20Carcinogenesis%20Research%20Information%20System%20(CCRIS)%22%5BSourceName%5D%20AND%20hasnohold%5Bfilt%5D) Help for CCRIS Users in PubChem: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/toxnet/Accessing_CCRIS_Content_from_PubChem.html or PDF: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/toxnet/Accessing_CCRIS_Content_from_PubChem.pdf. >>>!!!>>>
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>>>!!!<<<As stated 2017-05-23 Cancer GEnome Mine is no longer available >>>!!!<<< Cancer GEnome Mine is a public database for storing clinical information about tumor samples and microarray data, with emphasis on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and data mining of gene copy number changes.
Complete Genomics provides free public access to a variety of whole human genome data sets generated from Complete Genomics’ sequencing service. The research community can explore and familiarize themselves with the quality of these data sets, review the data formats provided from our sequencing service, and augment their own research with additional summaries of genomic variation across a panel of diverse individuals. The quality of these data sets is representative of what a customer can expect to receive for their own samples. This public genome repository comprises genome results from both our Standard Sequencing Service (69 standard, non-diseased samples) and the Cancer Sequencing Service (two matched tumor and normal sample pairs). In March 2013 Complete Genomics was acquired by BGI-Shenzhen , the world’s largest genomics services company. BGI is a company headquartered in Shenzhen, China that provides comprehensive sequencing and bioinformatics services for commercial science, medical, agricultural and environmental applications. Complete Genomics is now focused on building a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology and developing new and exciting research, clinical and consumer applications.
The Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) is a research resource for studies designed to assess the delivery and quality of breast cancer screening and related patient outcomes in the United States. The BCSC is a collaborative network of seven mammography registries with linkages to tumor and/or pathology registries. The network is supported by a central Statistical Coordinating Center.
The SICAS Medical Image Repository is a freely accessible repository containing medical research data including medical images, surface models, clinical data, genomics data and statistical shape models. The data can freely be organized and shared on SMIR and made publicly accessible with a DOI. Dedicated data sets are organized as collections of anatomical regions (e.g Cochlea). The data can be filtered using a modular search and accessed on the web or through the SMIR API.
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint program of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), is a nationwide oncology outcomes database for more than 1,500 Commission-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Some 70 percent of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer in the United States are captured at the institutional level and reported to the NCDB. The NCDB, begun in 1989, now contains approximately 29 million records from hospital cancer registries across the United States. Data on all types of cancer are tracked and analyzed. These data are used to explore trends in cancer care, to create regional and state benchmarks for participating hospitals, and to serve as the basis for quality improvement.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
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>>>!!!<<< The NCI Cancer Models Database, caMOD, was retired on December 24, 2015. Information about many of the mouse models hosted in caMOD was obtained from the Jackson Laboratory Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database and can be accessed through that resource http://tumor.informatics.jax.org/mtbwi/index.do . See caMOD Retirement Announcement https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/display/caMOD/caMOD+Retirement+Announcement >>>>!!<<< Query the Cancer Models database for models submitted by fellow researchers. Retrieve information about the making of models, their genetic description, histopathology, derived cell lines, associated images, carcinogenic agents, and therapeutic trials. Links to associated publications and other resources are provided.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
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This is an information resource for central nervous system imaging which integrates clinical information with magnetic resonance (MR), x-ray computed tomography (CT), and nuclear medicine images.
Established by the HLA Informatics Group of the Anthony Nolan Research Institute, IPD provides a centralized system for studying the immune system's polymorphism in genes. The IPD maintains databases concerning the sequences of human Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), sequences of the major histocompatibility complex in a number of species, human platelet antigens (HPA), and tumor cell lines. Each subject has related, credible news, current research and publications, and a searchable database for highly specific, research grade genetic information.
The CPTAC Data Portal is the centralized repository for the dissemination of proteomic data collected by the Proteome Characterization Centers (PCCs) for the CPTAC program. The portal also hosts analyses of the mass spectrometry data (mapping of spectra to peptide sequences and protein identification) from the PCCs and from a CPTAC-sponsored common data analysis pipeline (CDAP).
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
Project Data Sphere, LLC, operates a free digital library-laboratory where the research community can broadly share, integrate and analyze historical, de-identified, patient-level data from academic and industry cancer Phase II-III clinical trials. These patient-level datasets are available through the Project Data Sphere platform to researchers affiliated with life science companies, hospitals and institutions, as well as independent researchers, at no cost and without requiring a research proposal.
The CancerData site is an effort of the Medical Informatics and Knowledge Engineering team (MIKE for short) of Maastro Clinic, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Our activities in the field of medical image analysis and data modelling are visible in a number of projects we are running. CancerData is offering several datasets. They are grouped in collections and can be public or private. You can search for public datasets in the NBIA (National Biomedical Imaging Archive) image archives without logging in.
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CaPSURE™ is a longitudinal, observational study of approximately 15,000 men with all stages of biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Patients have enrolled at 43 community urology practices, academic medical centers, and VA hospitals throughout the United States since 1995. CEASAR stands for Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery and Radiation. The ongoing goal of CEASAR is to help learn more about what prostate cancer treatments work best, for which patients, in whose hands. There are currently about 3,600 men with a prostate cancer diagnosis participating in CEASAR. Three rounds of surveys have been completed, with the first carried out in the spring of 2010. We are currently in the process of conducting our fourth survey with the same group of men in our study. This survey, our Three Year Follow-up, will occur throughout the summer of 2014.
The KADoNiS (Karlsruhe Astrophysical Database of Nucleosynthesis in Stars) project is an online database for cross sections relevant for s-process and the p-process nucleosynthesis. Recently, the p-process part of the KADoNiS database has been extended, and now includes almost all available experimental data from reactions in or close to the respective Gamow window
The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia project is a collaboration between the Broad Institute, and the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and its Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation to conduct a detailed genetic and pharmacologic characterization of a large panel of human cancer models, to develop integrated computational analyses that link distinct pharmacologic vulnerabilities to genomic patterns and to translate cell line integrative genomics into cancer patient stratification. The CCLE provides public access to genomic data, analysis and visualization for about 1000 cell lines.
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal provides a platform for researchers to search, download, and analyze data sets generated by TCGA. It contains clinical information, genomic characterization data, and high level sequence analysis of the tumor genomes. The Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is the central provider of TCGA data. The DCC standardizes data formats and validates submitted data.
The NCI's Genomic Data Commons (GDC) provides the cancer research community with a unified data repository that enables data sharing across cancer genomic studies in support of precision medicine. The GDC obtains validated datasets from NCI programs in which the strategies for tissue collection couples quantity with high quality. Tools are provided to guide data submissions by researchers and institutions.
Synapse is an open source software platform that clinical and biological data scientists can use to carry out, track, and communicate their research in real time. Synapse enables co-location of scientific content (data, code, results) and narrative descriptions of that work.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
The Cancer Immunome Database (TCIA) provides results of comprehensive immunogenomic analyses of next generation sequencing data (NGS) data for 20 solid cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other datasource. The Cancer Immunome Atlas (TCIA) was developed and is maintained at the Division of Bioinformatics (ICBI). The database can be queried for the gene expression of specific immune-related gene sets, cellular composition of immune infiltrates (characterized using gene set enrichment analyses and deconvolution), neoantigens and cancer-germline antigens, HLA types, and tumor heterogeneity (estimated from cancer cell fractions). Moreover it provides survival analyses for different types immunological parameters. TCIA will be constantly updated with new data and results.