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Found 75 result(s)
Surface air temperature change is a primary measure of global climate change. The GISTEMP project started in the late 1970s to provide an estimate of the changing global surface air temperature which could be compared with the estimates obtained from climate models simulating the effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance. The continuing analysis updates global temperature change from the late 1800s to the present.
The World Ocean Atlas (WOA) contains objectively analyzed climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, oxygen, and other measured variables at standard depth levels for various compositing periods for the world ocean. Regional climatologies were created from the Atlas, providing a set of high resolution mean fields for temperature and salinity. The World Ocean Atlas 2018 (WOA18) release September 30, 2018 updates previous versions of the World Ocean Atlas to include approximately 3 million new oceanographic casts added to the World Ocean Database (WOD) and renewed and updated quality control. The WOA18 temperature and salinity fields are being released as preliminary in order to take advantage of community-wide quality assurance. WOA follows the World Ocean Database - WOD periodic major releases and quarterly updates to those releases.
ODIN contains engineering databases (Mat-Database, Hiad-Database, Nesshy-Database, HTR-Fuel-Database, HTR-Graphit-Database) and document management sites and other information related to European research in the area of nuclear and conventional energy.
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
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This web site provides adjusted and homogenized climate data for many climatological stations in Canada. These data were created for use in climate research including climate change studies. They incorporate a number of adjustments applied to the original station data to address shifts due to changes in instruments and in observing procedures. Sometimes the observations from several stations were joined to generate a long time series. The adjusted and homogenized data are provided for four climate elements: surface air temperature, precipitation, surface pressure, and surface wind speed.
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PhenoM (Phenomics of yeast Mutants) stores, retrieves, visualises and data mines the quantitative single-cell measurements extracted from micrographs of temperature-sensitive mutant cells.
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LIAG's Geophysics Information System (FIS GP) serves for the storage and supply of geophysical measurements and evaluations of LIAG and its partners. The architecture of the overall system intends a subdivision into an universal part (superstructure) and into several subsystems dedicated to geophysical methods (borehole geophysics, gravimetry, magnetics, 1D/2D geoelectrics, underground temperatures, seismics, VSP, helicopter geophysics and rock physics. The building of more subsystems is planned.
The PRISM Climate Group gathers climate observations from a wide range of monitoring networks, applies sophisticated quality control measures, and develops spatial climate datasets to reveal short- and long-term climate patterns. The resulting datasets incorporate a variety of modeling techniques and are available at multiple spatial/temporal resolutions, covering the period from 1895 to the present. Whenever possible, we offer these datasets to the public, either free of charge or for a fee (depending on dataset size/complexity and funding available for the activity).
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Thousands of Temperature and salinity profiles obtained by means of Nansen hydrographic casts and available earlier only as station sheets have been digitized at the German Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). In a cooperative effort between the KlimaCampus of the University of Hamburg and the German Oceanographic Data Centre (DOD, Hamburg) about 7500 hydrographic profiles were checked and identified as missing in the international oceanographic databases. Since most of the profiles were obtained in the decades before the second World War they represent an important extension of the international historical database and a respective contribution to the IOC Global Oceanographic Data Archeology and Rescue Project (GODAR). Since 2009 our efforts resulted in locating about 7500 hydrographic profiles that are not yet available for the oceanographic community.
The World Ocean Database (WOD) is a collection of scientifically quality-controlled ocean profile and plankton data that includes measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorophyll, alkalinity, pH, pCO2, TCO2, Tritium, Δ13Carbon, Δ14Carbon, Δ18Oxygen, Freon, Helium, Δ3Helium, Neon, and plankton. WOD contains all data of "World Data Service Oceanography" (WDS-Oceanography).
The GTN-P database is an object-related database open for a diverse range of data. Because of the complexity of the PAGE21 project, data provided in the GTN-P management system are extremely diverse, ranging from active-layer thickness measurements once per year to flux measurement every second and everthing else in between. The data can be assigned to two broad categories: Quantitative data which is all data that can be measured numerically. Quantitative data comprise all in situ measurements, i.e. permafrost temperatures and active layer thickness (mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, soil temperature profiles). Qualitative data (knowledge products) are observations not based on measurements, such as observations on soils, vegetation, relief, etc.
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The main focus of tambora.org is Historical Climatology. Years of meticulous work in this field in research groups around the world have resulted in large data collections on climatic parameters such as temperature, precipitation, storms, floods, etc. with different regional, temporal and thematic foci. tambora.org enables researchers to collaboratively interpret the information derived from historical sources. It provides a database for original text quotations together with bibliographic references and the extracted places, dates and coded climate and environmental information.
Argo is an international programme using autonomous floats to collect temperature, salinity and current data in the ice-free oceans. It is teamed with the Jason ocean satellite series.Argo will soon reach its target of 3000 floats delivering data within 24 hours to researchers and operational centres worldwide. 23 countries contribute floats to Argo and many others help with float deployments. Argo has revolutionized the collection of information from inside the oceans. ARGO Project is organized in regional and national Centers with a Project Office, an Information Center (AIC) and 2 Global Data Centers (GDAC), at the United States and at France. Each DAC submits regularly all its new files to both USGODAE and Coriolis GDACs.The whole Argo data set is available in real time and delayed mode from the global data centres (GDACs). The internet addresses are: • http://www.usgodae.org/argo/argo.html • http://www.argodatamgt.org .
The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken.
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eKlima is a web site to access the database of climate data of the Norwegian Meteorological Institute from an external computer. The database contains measurements made by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and its collaborators as far back in time as 1957. There are also some data that are older than that, with the longest data sets going as far back in time as 150 years. However, for the period before 1957 not all measurements are completely digitised yet.
Summit Station is a US National Science Foundation-funded research station on the Greenland ice cap. The website offers near-real time weather summaries and a webcam. Other data associated with the Summit Station can be found through the International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) website: http://iasoa.org or from Greenland Environmental Observatory at geosummit.org
IoT Lab is a research platform exploring the potential of crowdsourcing and Internet of Things for multidisciplinary research with more end-user interactions. IoT Lab is a European Research project which aims at researching the potential of crowdsourcing to extend IoT testbed infrastructure for multidisciplinary experiments with more end-user interactions. It addresses topics such as: - Crowdsourcing mechanisms and tools; - “Crowdsourcing-driven research”; - Virtualization of crowdsourcing and testbeds; - Ubiquitous Interconnection and Cloudification of testbeds; - Testbed as a Service platform; - Multidisciplinary experiments; - End-user and societal value creation; - Privacy and personal data protection.
The National Park Service Gaseous Pollutant Monitoring Program Database provides gaseous air pollutant and meteorological data as *.csv files. Queries allow filtering by location of ozone, wind speed, wind direction, ambient temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, wetness data.
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The Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) is a tropical marine research center. Data are available on topics including reef weather, sea temperature, cyclones, and water quality.
The CCKP contains environmental, disaster risk, and socio-economic datasets, as well as synthesis products, such as the Climate Adaptation Country Profiles, which are built and packaged for specific user-focused functions such as climate change indices for a particular country. The portal also provides intelligent links to other resources and tools.
The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) was developed to support hurricane research. There are three components to TCIS; a global archive of multi-satellite hurricane observations 1999-2010 (Tropical Cyclone Data Archive), North Atlantic Hurricane Watch and ASA Convective Processes Experiment (CPEX) aircraft campaign. Together, data and visualizations from the real time system and data archive can be used to study hurricane process, validate and improve models, and assist in developing new algorithms and data assimilation techniques.