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Found 22 result(s)
VegBank is the vegetation plot database of the Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification. VegBank consists of three linked databases that contain the actual plot records, vegetation types recognized in the U.S. National Vegetation Classification and other vegetation types submitted by users, and all plant taxa recognized by ITIS/USDA as well as all other plant taxa recorded in plot records. Vegetation records, community types and plant taxa may be submitted to VegBank and may be subsequently searched, viewed, annotated, revised, interpreted, downloaded, and cited. VegBank receives its data from the VegBank community of users.
The goal of creating the Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD) is to provide the scientific community with comprehensive information o­n the approximately 700 prokaryote species that are present in the human oral cavity. Approximately 49% are officially named, 17% unnamed (but cultivated) and 34% are known o­nly as uncultivated phylotypes. The HOMD presents a provisional naming scheme for the currently unnamed species so that strain, clone, and probe data from any laboratory can be directly linked to a stably named reference scheme. The HOMD links sequence data with phenotypic, phylogenetic, clinical, and bibliographic information. Genome sequences for oral bacteria determined as part of this project, the Human Microbiome Project, and other sequencing projects are being added to the HOMD as they become available. Genomes for 315 oral taxa (46% of taxa o­n HOMD) are currently available o­n HOMD. The HOMD site offers easy to use tools for viewing all publically available oral bacterial genomes.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
The Consortium of Pacific Herbaria (CPH) supports the enhancement of research cyberinfrastructure within Hawai'i and the Pacific basin for implementing shared specimen data hosting of plant specimens. The CPH network is a regional node of the US Virtual Herbarium.
The BBS is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service to monitor the status and trends of North American bird populations. Following a rigorous protocol, BBS data are collected by thousands of dedicated participants along thousands of randomly established roadside routes throughout the continent. Professional BBS coordinators and data managers work closely with researchers and statisticians to compile and deliver these population data and population trend analyses on more than 400 bird species, for use by conservation managers, scientists, and the general public.
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Systema Dipterorum (and the former Biosystematic Database of World Diptera) is a source of names and information about those names and the taxa to which they apply. Systema Dipterorum is a set of tools to aid users in finding information about flies. The two main components of Systema Dipterorum are the Nomenclator and the Reference database.
TreeBASE is a repository of phylogenetic information, specifically user-submitted phylogenetic trees and the data used to generate them. TreeBASE accepts all types of phylogenetic data (e.g., trees of species, trees of populations, trees of genes) representing all biotic taxa. Data in TreeBASE are exposed to the public if they are used in a publication that is in press or published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, book, conference proceedings, or thesis. Data used in publications that are in preparation or in review can be submitted to TreeBASE but are only available to the authors, publication editors, or reviewers using a special access code.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
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Our Frozen Zoo® is the largest and most diverse collection of its kind in the world. It contains over 10,000 living cell cultures, oocytes, sperm, and embryos representing nearly 1,000 taxa, including one extinct species, the po’ouli. Located at the Beckman Center for Conservation Research, the collection is also duplicated for safekeeping at a second site. The irreplaceable living cell lines, gametes, and embryos stored in the Frozen Zoo® provide an invaluable resource for conservation, assisted reproduction, evolutionary biology, and wildlife medicine.
The Paleobiology Database (PaleoBioDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.
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Country
DEEMY is collecting descriptive data on ectomycorrhizae, including extant character descriptions and definitions. Ectomycorrhizae are mutualistic structures formed by fungi and the roots of forest trees. They are predominantly found in the temperate and boreal climate zones but occur also in humid tropic regions, as well as in soils of poor nutrition. Without mycorrhizae, trees would not be able to take up water and minerals. Ectomycorrhizae show a wide range of anatomical diversity which represents their possible function in tree nutrition and ecology. Their anatomical data, in general, allow a quick determination and provide at the same time ecologically important information about possible functions for tree nutrition.
Fossilworks is a web-based portal to the Paleobiology Database. Fossilworks is the original public interface to the PaleoDB and is housed at Macquarie. It is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for marine and terrestrial animals and plants of any geological age, as well as web-based software for statistical analysis of the data. The project's wider, long-term goal is to encourage collaborative efforts to answer large-scale paleobiological questions by developing a useful database infrastructure and bringing together large data sets.
Country
Since 2003, data concerning material, slides and taxa, existing within the Friedrich Hustedt Diatom centre, are being entered in a database. In 2014, all data from the initial collection database have been transferred into a new system using the EarthCape platform. The web interface of this new system is now on-line but is incomplete. The database stores information on all specimens in the collection, named by Hustedt or deposited later by other workers, with the literature-, material- and slide-information. Taxon names have been entered as they appear on the slides or on a sheet in a slidebox, although in some cases, recently proposed names are given under “comments”. The database also has a complete entry of all of the publications held in the library of the centre, now more than 8,000.
The PLANKTON*NET data provider at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is an open access repository for plankton-related information. It covers all types of phytoplankton and zooplankton from marine and freshwater areas. PLANKTON*NET's greatest strength is its comprehensiveness as for the different taxa image information as well as taxonomic descriptions can be archived. PLANKTON*NET also contains a glossary with accompanying images to illustrate the term definitions. PLANKTON*NET therefore presents a vital tool for the preservation of historic data sets as well as the archival of current research results. Because interoperability with international biodiversity data providers (e.g. GBIF) is one of our aims, the architecture behind the new planktonnet@awi repository is observation centric and allows for mulitple assignment of assets (images, references, animations, etc) to any given observation. In addition, images can be grouped in sets and/or assigned tags to satisfy user-specific needs . Sets (and respective images) of relevance to the scientific community and/or general public have been assigned a persistant digital object identifier (DOI) for the purpose of long-term preservation (e.g. set ""Plankton*Net celebrates 50 years of Roman Treaties"", handle: 10013/de.awi.planktonnet.set.495)"
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SeSam is an outstanding international collection of recent and fossil animals and plants from all over the world. It also holds an important specialized library. The really substantial data of this collection constitute the basis of every taxonomic-systematical, ecological, biogeographical or biostratigraphical fundamental research as well as every practical environmental research. Because of its historical referencings this collection is also a precious cultural treasure that generates the often expensive heavy mission of its conservation.
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Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-features/). This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
Country
The "Flora of Bavaria" initiative with its data portal (14 million occurrence data) and Wiki representation is primarily a citizen science project. Efforts to describe and monitor the flora of Bavaria have been ongoing for 100 years. The goal of these efforts is to record all vascular plants, including newcomers, and to document threatened or former local occurrences. Being geographically largest state of Germany with a broad range of habitats, Bavaria has a special responsibility for documenting and maintaining its plant diversity . About 85% of all German vascular plant species occur in Bavaria, and in addition it has about 50 endemic taxa, only known from Bavaria (most of them occur in the Alps). The Wiki is collaboration of volunteers and local and regional Bavarian botanical societies. Everybody is welcome to contribute, especially with photos or reports of local changes in the flora. The Flora of Bavaria project is providing access to a research data repository for occurrence data powered by the Diversity Workbench database framework.
OBIS strives to document the ocean's diversity, distribution and abundance of life. Created by the Census of Marine Life, OBIS is now part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, under its International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) programme
This database is a global archive and describes plant traits from throughout the globe. TRY is a network of vegetation scientists headed by DIVERSITAS, IGBP, iDiv, the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry and an international Advisory Board. About half of the data are geo-referenced, providing a global coverage of more than 8000 measurement sites.