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Found 18 result(s)
Herschel has been designed to observe the `cool universe'; it is observing the structure formation in the early universe, resolving the far infrared cosmic background, revealing cosmologically evolving AGN/starburst symbiosis and galaxy evolution at the epochs when most stars in the universe were formed, unveiling the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium and its molecular clouds, the wombs of the stars, and unravelling the mechanisms governing the formation of and evolution of stars and their planetary systems, including our own solar system, putting it into context. In short, Herschel is opening a new window to study how the universe has evolved to become the universe we see today, and how our star the sun, our planet the earth, and we ourselves fit in.
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The following databases are maintained at IAA-ULB: Nuclear Database (BRUSLIB - A collection of nuclear data (masses, fission barriers, E1 strength functions, nuclear level densities, partition functions, reaction rates) of interest for nuclear astrophysics, stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis), Nuclear Network Generator NetGen (A tool for generating nuclear-reaction rates on user-defined networks), NACRE II (An update of the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE) including the evaluation of 34 reactions on stable targets with mass numbers A<16), The Ninth Catalogue of Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries (SB9), The Henize sample of S stars, The radial-velocity monitoring of barium and S stars, Molecular linelist (Molecular linelists for stellar spectra), and Stellar models (Pre-main-sequence and super-AGB phases).
RAVE (RAdial Velocity Experiment) is a multi-fiber spectroscopic astronomical survey of stars in the Milky Way using the 1.2-m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE collaboration consists of researchers from over 20 institutions around the world and is coordinated by the Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam.As a southern hemisphere survey covering 20,000 square degrees of the sky, RAVE's primary aim is to derive the radial velocity of stars from the observed spectra. Additional information is also derived such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, photometric parallax and elemental abundance data for the stars. The survey represents a giant leap forward in our understanding of our own Milky Way galaxy; with RAVE's vast stellar kinematic database the structure, formation and evolution of our Galaxy can be studied.
Finding planets orbiting nearby stars has been a holy grail in astronomy for more than 400 years. We began working on this problem 30 years ago, at a time when there were no known extrasolar planets. In late 1995 we began routinely finding planets around the nearest stars. Since then we have found several hundred planets, including the first sub-saturn mass planet, the first neptune mass planet, the first terrestrial mass planet, the first multiple planet system, and the first transiting planet.
The KADoNiS (Karlsruhe Astrophysical Database of Nucleosynthesis in Stars) project is an online database for cross sections relevant for s-process and the p-process nucleosynthesis. Recently, the p-process part of the KADoNiS database has been extended, and now includes almost all available experimental data from reactions in or close to the respective Gamow window
Spitzer is the final mission in NASA's Great Observatories Program - a family of four orbiting observatories, each observing the Universe in a different kind of light (visible, gamma rays, X-rays, and infrared). Spitzer is also a part of NASA's Astronomical Search for Origins Program, designed to provide information which will help us understand our cosmic roots, and how galaxies, stars and planets develop and form.
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SIMBAD astronomical database is the world reference database for the identification of astronomical objects and provides basic data, cross-identifications, bibliography and measurements for astronomical objects outside the solar system. Using VizieR, the catalogue service for the CDS reference collection of astronomical catalogues and tables published in academic journals and the Aladin interactive software sky atlas for access, visualization and analysis of astronomical images, surveys, catalogues, databases and related data. Simbad bibliographic survey began in 1950 for stars (at least bright stars) and in 1983 for all other objects (outside the solar system)
STScI's innovative ways to share Hubble's remarkable discoveries with the public.HubbleSite prepares and disseminates the photographs and animations seen in the news... as well as posters, slide shows, exhibits, and educational products in print and electronic formats
AtomDB is an atomic database useful for X-ray plasma spectral modeling. The current version of AtomDB is primarly used for modeing collisional plasmas, those where hot electrons colliding with astrophysically abundant elements and ions create X-ray emission. However, AtomDB is also useful when modeling absorption by elements and ions or even photoionized plasmas, where X-ray photons (often from a simple power-law source) interacting with elements and ions create complex spectra.
STARK-B is a database of calculated widths and shifts of isolated lines of atoms and ions due to electron and ion collisions. This database is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes. In addition, it is also devoted to laboratory plasmas, laser equipments and technological plasmas. So, the domain of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is wide and depends on the ionization degree of the considered ion. The temperature can vary from several thousands for neutral atoms to several hundred thousands of Kelvin for highly charged ions. The electron or ion density can vary from 1012 (case of stellar atmospheres) to several 1019cm-3 (some white dwarfs and some laboratory plasmas).
CAD INASAN was established in 1980 as a branch regional center of the Centre de Donnes Stellaire (CDS). Since that time, the CAD has been working to distribute, create and store astronomical data according to the requirements of time, specifics of techniques and requests of the Russian astronomical community. At present, the staff of the CAD is maintaining mirrors of several major astronomical data resources, keeping a record of Russian astronomical data resources, and is working to create new astronomical data resources. Since 2002, we are the important part of the Russian Virtual Observatory project (member of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance - IVOA). The CAD archive is based on astronomical catalogues received from Strasbourg since 1980. Several well known astronomical archives and databases are also stored at INASAN (e.g. VizieR, ADS, INES, VALD). At present CAD coordinates work on the Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) project
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
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German astronomical observatories own considerable collection of photographic plates. While these observations lead to significant discoveries in the past, they are also of interest for scientists today and in the future. In particular, for the study of long-term variability of many types of stars, these measurements are of immense scientific value. There are about 85000 plates in the archives of Hamburger Sternwarte, Dr. Karl Remeis-Sternwarte Bamberg, and Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP). The plates are digitized with high-resolution flatbed scanners. In addition, the corresponding plate envelopes and observation logbooks are digitized, and further metadata are entered into the database. The work is carried out within the project “Digitalisierung astronomischer Fotoplatten und ihre Integration in das internationale Virtual Observatory”, which is funded by the DFG.
The NASA Exoplanet Archive collects and serves public data to support the search for and characterization of extra-solar planets (exoplanets) and their host stars. The data include published light curves, images, spectra and parameters, and time-series data from surveys that aim to discover transiting exoplanets. Tools are provided to work with the data, particularly the display and analysis of transit data sets from Kepler and CoRoT. All data are validated by the Exoplanet Archive science staff and traced to their sources. The Exoplanet Archive is the U.S. data portal for the CoRoT mission.
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy. Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008; SDSS-III 2008-2014; SDSS-IV 2013 ongoing), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. DSS-IV is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS Collaboration including the Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Mellon University, the Chilean Participation Group, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, The Johns Hopkins University, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU) / University of Tokyo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Leibniz Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (MPA Garching), Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA Heidelberg), National Astronomical Observatory of China, New Mexico State University, New York University, The Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, United Kingdom Participation Group, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, University of Arizona, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Portsmouth, University of Utah, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin, Vanderbilt University, and Yale University.
This unique resource covers the entire field of astronomy and astrophysics and this online version includes the full text of over 2,750 articles, plus sophisticated search and retrieval functionality, links to the primary literature, and is frequently updated with new material. An active editorial team, headed by the Encyclopedia's editor-in-chief, Paul Murdin, oversees the continual commissioning, reviewing and loading of new and revised content.In a unique collaboration, Nature Publishing Group and Institute of Physics Publishing published the most extensive and comprehensive reference work in astronomy and astrophysics in both print and online formats. First published as a four volume print edition in 2001, the initial Web version went live in 2002, and contained the original print material and was rapidly supplemented with numerous updates and newly commissioned material. Since July 2006 the Encyclopedia is published solely by Taylor & Francis.