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Found 14 result(s)
The WRDC, located at the Main Geophysical Observatory in St. Petersburg, Russia, processes solar radiation data currently submitted from more than 500 stations located in 56 countries and operates an archive with more than 1200 stations listed in its catalogue. The WRDC is the central depository of the measured components such as: global, diffuse and direct solar radiation, downward atmospheric radiation, net total and terrestrial surface radiation (upward), spectral radiation components (instantaneous fluxes), and sunshine duration, on hourly, daily or monthly basis.
The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth’s atmosphere from three broadband channels. CERES products include both solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation from the top of the atmosphere to the Earth's surface.
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The database includes world-wide cosmic-ray neutron observations (pressure-corrected 1 hour counts) since 1953. The date are opened in two formats; one is 4096-byte "longformat" data and the other one is 80-byte "cardformat" data. Since the "cardformat" data are prepared only for quick check of data, the "longformat" data, which include information for data usage (constant, factors, etc), should be used for research works. PS files (compressed) of yearly plots are also available.
Herschel has been designed to observe the `cool universe'; it is observing the structure formation in the early universe, resolving the far infrared cosmic background, revealing cosmologically evolving AGN/starburst symbiosis and galaxy evolution at the epochs when most stars in the universe were formed, unveiling the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium and its molecular clouds, the wombs of the stars, and unravelling the mechanisms governing the formation of and evolution of stars and their planetary systems, including our own solar system, putting it into context. In short, Herschel is opening a new window to study how the universe has evolved to become the universe we see today, and how our star the sun, our planet the earth, and we ourselves fit in.
The National Park Service Gaseous Pollutant Monitoring Program Database provides gaseous air pollutant and meteorological data as *.csv files. Queries allow filtering by location of ozone, wind speed, wind direction, ambient temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, wetness data.
Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) provides data relating to climate change forces and models, ozone depletion and rehabilitation, and baseline air quality. Data are freely available so the public, policy makers, and scientists stay current with long-term atmospheric trends.
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University of Southern Queensland Research Data Collection in Research Data Australia cover 123 subjects areas including AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES and ENGINEERING .
The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) measurements are designed to improve understanding of the Earth’s environment and climate. MISR provides radiometrically and geometrically calibrated images in four spectral bands at each of nine widely-spaced angles. Spatial sampling of 275 and 1100 meters is provided on a global basis. All MISR data products are available in HDF-EOS format, and select products are available in netCDF format.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
This website aggregates several services that provide access to data of the INTEGRAL Mission. ESA's INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory is detecting some of the most energetic radiation that comes from space. It is the most sensitive gamma-ray observatory ever launched. INTEGRAL is an ESA mission in cooperation with Russia and the United States
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SMHI's observation stations collect large quantities of data, including temperature, precipitation, wind, air pressure, lightning, solar radiation and ozone. Satellites and radar installations are also important sources. Data is presented continuously on smhi.se and used in SMHI's various weather services. In the Explorer SMHI’s data ( http://opendata-catalog.smhi.se/explore/ ) you find data available with open access (in Swedish). Information in English on Oceanographic observations, Model data (HIROMB BS01), Machine to machine – feeds, and Conditions of use.
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Historical Climate Data (formerly: The National Climate Data and Information Archive - NCDC) is a web-based resource maintained by Environment and Climate Change Canada and the Meteorological Service of Canada. The site houses a number of statistical and data compilation and viewing tools. From the website, users can access historical climate data for Canadian locations and dates, view climate normals and averages, and climate summaries. A list of Canadian air stations and their meteorological reports and activities is also available, along with rainfall statistics for more than 500 locations across Canada. Users can also download the Canadian daily climate data for 2006/07. In addition, technical documentation is offered for data users to interpret the available data. Other documentation includes a catalogue of Canadian weather reporting stations, a glossary, and a calculation of the 1971 to 2000 climate normals for Canada. This resource carries authority and accuracy because it is maintained by a national government department and service. While the majority of the statistics are historical, the data is up-to-date and contains current and fairly recent climate data. This government resource is intended for an audience that has the ability and knowledge to interpret climatological data
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.