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Found 17 result(s)
Country
The German General Social Survey (ALLBUS) collects up-to-date data on attitudes, behavior, and social structure in Germany. Every two years since 1980 a representative cross section of the population is surveyed using both constant and variable questions. The ALLBUS data become available to interested parties for research and teaching as soon as they are processed and documented.
The Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (CWED) contains information about the structure and generosity of social insurance benefits in 33 countries around the world. The data contained here are an updated and extended version of CWED 1, which has been available since 2004. This web site allows you to download customized portions of the CWED 2 data, browse the Working Paper Series or access documentary material.
The General Social Survey (GSS) conducts basic scientific research on the structure and development of American society with a data-collection program designed to both monitor societal change within the United States and to compare the United States to other nations.
Country
SowiDataNet|datorium is a research data repository for social sciences and economics that enables researchers to easily and securely document, publish and share (quantitative) primary and secondary data. The repository is geared to the needs of the scientific community: a comprehensive metadata schema provides an opportunity to describe the research data in detail, which is the prerequisite for effective reuse. With the publication in SowiDataNet|datorium, research data become citable because they are given a persistent identifier, namely a "Digital Object Identifier (DOI)". A two-stage review process also guarantees a quality and technical quality check of the data.
The aim of the project was to compile a representative computerized corpus of German for the period 1650-1800. This is the first such corpus of early modern German and it is intended as a primary research resource in a number of disciplines. Its structure deliberately parallels that of extant historical corpora of English in order to facilitate systematic comparative studies. The regional dimension which was an essential feature of the projects also provides information about the link between language and changes in the relative cultural and political areas within Germany.
Open access repository for digital research created at the University of Minnesota. U of M researchers may deposit data to the Libraries’ Data Repository for U of M (DRUM), subject to our collection policies. All data is publicly accessible. Data sets submitted to the Data Repository are reviewed by data curation staff to ensure that data is in a format and structure that best facilitates long-term access, discovery, and reuse.
Country
GovData the data portal for Germany offers consistent and central access to administrative data at the federal, state, and local level. Objective is to make data more available and easier to use at a single location. As set out in the concept of "open data", we attempt to facilitate the use of open licenses and to increase the supply of machine-readable raw data.
Country
The CRC806-Database platform is the Research Data Management infrastructure of the SFB / CRC 806. The infrastructure is implemented using Open Source software, and implements Open Science, Open Access and Open Data principles. The Collaborative Research Centre (CRC; ‘Sonderforschungsbereich’ or SFB) is designed to capture the complex nature of chronology, regional structure, climatic, environmental and socio-cultural contexts of major intercontinental and transcontinental events of dispersal of Modern Man from Africa to Western Eurasia, and particularly to Europe (Cited from introductory text on: www.sfb806.de).
The Manchester Romani Project is part of an international network of scholarly projects devoted to research on Romani language and linguistics, coordinated in partnership with Dieter Halwachs (Institute of Linguistics, Graz University and Romani-Projekt Graz), and Peter Bakker (Institute of Linguistics, Aarhus University). The project explores the linguistic features of the dialects of the Romani language, and their distribution in geographical space. An interactive web application is being designed, which will allow users to search and locate on a map different dialectal variants, and to explore how variants cluster in particular regions. Examples sentences and words with sound files will also be made available, to give impressions of dialectal variation within Romani. From the distribution of linguistic forms among the dialects it will be possible to make infeences about social-historical contacts among the Romani communities, and about migration patterns.
The National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect (NDACAN) promotes scholarly exchange among researchers in the child maltreatment field. NDACAN acquires microdata from leading researchers and national data collection efforts and makes these datasets available to the research community for secondary analysis.
The SURF Data Repository is a user-friendly web-based data publication platform that allows researchers to store, annotate and publish research datasets of any size to ensure long-term preservation and availability of their data. The service allows any dataset to be stored, independent of volume, number of files and structure. A published dataset is enriched with complex metadata, unique identifiers are added and the data is preserved for an agreed-upon period of time. The service is domain-agnostic and supports multiple communities with different policy and metadata requirements.
Country
One of the Bundesbank's tasks is to collect statistical data. Some of these data are then fed into the time series published on the internet in the time series database. In recent years, there have been increased demands for all data providers to make more data available for research purposes. This applies, on the one hand, to the individual data used for the calculation of the published aggregated data. This is because only using these individual data is it possible to accurately reflect the heterogeneity of the relevant feature carriers in academic studies. Due to legal requirements, individual data cannot be made generally available. However, these data are made available under strict conditions and for clearly defined academic research purposes at the Research Centre of the Deutsche Bundesbank. Furthermore, in the area of aggregated data, there is also an increasing demand for real-time data. These data reflect an out-of-date data set and may therefore deviate from data currently available as a result of corrections carried out in the meantime.
The projects include airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, social science surveys, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the BAOBAB data portal enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that have been collected by operational networks since 1850, long term monitoring research networks and intensive scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Data documentation complies with metadata international standards, and data are delivered into standard formats. The data request interface takes full advantage of the database relational structure and enables users to elaborate multicriteria requests (period, area, property…).
The Water Survey has flourished for more than a century by anticipating and responding to new challenges and opportunities to serve the citizens of Illinois. Today, the ISWS continues to demonstrate flexibility and adaptability by developing new programs, while continuing to provide long-standing services upon which Illinoisans have come to rely. The Scientific Surveys of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are the primary agencies in Illinois responsible for producing and disseminating scientific and technological information, services, and products related to the environment, economic development, and quality of life. To achieve this mission, the Scientific Surveys conduct state-of-the-art research and collect, analyze, archive, and disseminate high-quality, objective data and technical information. The information, services, and products provide a sound technical basis for the citizens and policymakers of Illinois and the nation to make wise social, economic, and environmental decisions.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
Merritt is a curation repository for the preservation of and access to the digital research data of the ten campus University of California system and external project collaborators. Merritt is supported by the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at the California Digital Library (CDL). While Merritt itself is content agnostic, accepting digital content regardless of domain, format, or structure, it is being used for management of research data, and it forms the basis for a number of domain-specific repositories, such as the ONEShare repository for earth and environmental science and the DataShare repository for life sciences. Merritt provides persistent identifiers, storage replication, fixity audit, complete version history, REST API, a comprehensive metadata catalog for discovery, ATOM-based syndication, and curatorially-defined collections, access control rules, and data use agreements (DUAs). Merritt content upload and download may each be curatorially-designated as public or restricted. Merritt DOIs are provided by UC3's EZID service, which is integrated with DataCite. All DOIs and associated metadata are automatically registered with DataCite and are harvested by Ex Libris PRIMO and Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index (DCI) for high-level discovery. Merritt is also a member node in the DataONE network; curatorially-designated data submitted to Merritt are automatically registered with DataONE for additional replication and federated discovery through the ONEMercury search/browse interface.
The German Text Archive (Deutsches Textarchiv, DTA) presents online a selection of key German-language works in various disciplines from the 17th to 19th centuries. The electronic full-texts are indexed linguistically and the search facilities tolerate a range of spelling variants. The DTA presents German-language printed works from around 1650 to 1900 as full text and as digital facsimile. The selection of texts was made on the basis of lexicographical criteria and includes scientific or scholarly texts, texts from everyday life, and literary works. The digitalisation was made from the first edition of each work. Using the digital images of these editions, the text was first typed up manually twice (‘double keying’). To represent the structure of the text, the electronic full-text was encoded in conformity with the XML standard TEI P5. The next stages complete the linguistic analysis, i.e. the text is tokenised, lemmatised, and the parts of speech are annotated. The DTA thus presents a linguistically analysed, historical full-text corpus, available for a range of questions in corpus linguistics. Thanks to the interdisciplinary nature of the DTA Corpus, it also offers valuable source-texts for neighbouring disciplines in the humanities, and for scientists, legal scholars and economists.