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Found 29 result(s)
ReefTEMPS is a temperature, pressure, salinity and other observables sensor network in coastal area of South, West and South West of Pacific ocean, driven by UMR ENTROPIE. It is an observatory service from the French national research infrastructure ILICO for “coastal environments”. Some of the network’s sensors have been deployed since 1958. Nearly hundred sensors are actually deployed in 14 countries covering an area of more than 8000 km from East to West. The data are acquired at different rates (from 1sec to 30 mn) depending on sensors and sites. They are processed and described using Climate and Forecast Metadata Convention at the end of oceanographic campaigns organized for sensors replacement every 6 months to 2 years.
Remote Sensing Systems is a world leader in processing and analyzing microwave data from satellite microwave sensors. We specialize in algorithm development, instrument calibration, ocean product development, and product validation. We have worked with more than 30 satellite microwave radiometer, sounder, and scatterometer instruments over the past 40 years. Currently, we operationally produce satellite retrievals for SSMIS, AMSR2, WindSat, and ASCAT. The geophysical retrievals obtained from these sensors are made available in near-real-time (NRT) to the global scientific community and general public via FTP and this web site.
EIDA, an initiative within ORFEUS, is a distributed data centre established to (a) securely archive seismic waveform data and related metadata, gathered by European research infrastructures, and (b) provide transparent access to the archives by the geosciences research communities. EIDA nodes are data centres which collect and archive data from seismic networks deploying broad-band sensors, short period sensors, accelerometers, infrasound sensors and other geophysical instruments. Networks contributing data to EIDA are listed in the ORFEUS EIDA networklist (http://www.orfeus-eu.org/data/eida/networks/). Data from the ORFEUS Data Center (ODC), hosted by KNMI, are available through EIDA. Technically, EIDA is based on an underlying architecture developed by GFZ to provide transparent access to all nodes' data. Data within the distributed archives are accessible via the ArcLink protocol (http://www.seiscomp3.org/wiki/doc/applications/arclink).
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
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The NERC Earth Observation Data Centre (NEODC) is a Designated Data Centre of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and as such it is tasked with the acquisition, archiving and provision of access to remotely sensed data of the surface of the Earth acquired by satellite and airborne sensors. The NEODC also acts as a source of information regarding Earth Observation data generally and its application to environmental research and survey with the provision of guidance and advice, as appropriate, on matters of copyright, policy and strategy with regard to specific NERC EO data resources.
IoT Lab is a research platform exploring the potential of crowdsourcing and Internet of Things for multidisciplinary research with more end-user interactions. IoT Lab is a European Research project which aims at researching the potential of crowdsourcing to extend IoT testbed infrastructure for multidisciplinary experiments with more end-user interactions. It addresses topics such as: - Crowdsourcing mechanisms and tools; - “Crowdsourcing-driven research”; - Virtualization of crowdsourcing and testbeds; - Ubiquitous Interconnection and Cloudification of testbeds; - Testbed as a Service platform; - Multidisciplinary experiments; - End-user and societal value creation; - Privacy and personal data protection.
The Detection of Archaeological Residues using Remote-sensing Techniques (DART) project was initiated in 2010 in order to investigate the ability of various sensors to detect archaeological features in ‘difficult’ circumstances. Concluding in September 2013, DART had the overall aim of developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying gradual changes and dynamics in sensor responses associated with surface and near-surface archaeological features under different environmental and land-management conditions.
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Our data portal data.awi.de offers an integrative one-stop shop framework for discovering AWI research platforms including devices and sensors, tracklines, field reports, peer-reviewed publications, GIS products and mostly important data and data products archived in PANGAEA.
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SENSOR.awi.de is a repository for metadata information on research platforms/devices/sensors used to acquire scientific data. It supports item versionning including minting of PIDs. All items are cite-enabled.
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IGETS is the International Geodynamics and Earth Tide Service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). The main objective of IGETS is to monitor temporal variations of the Earth gravity field through long‐term records from ground gravimeters, tiltmeters, strainmeters and other geodynamic sensors. IGETS continues the activities of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) to provide support to geodetic and geophysical research activities using superconducting gravimeter (SG) data within the context of an international network. Furthermore, IGETS continues the activities of the International Center for Earth Tides (ICET), in particular, in collecting, archiving and distributing Earth tide records from long series of gravimeters, tiltmeters, strainmeters and other geodynamic sensors. GFZ is the main Data Center and operates the IGETS data base of worldwide high precision SG records. EOST (Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Strasbourg, France) is the secondary Data Center, The University of French Polynesia (Tahiti) and EOST (Strasbourg, France) are the two current Analysis Centers.
>>>!!!<<<The IGETS data base at GFZ Potsdam http://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010300 continues the activities of the International Center for Earth Tides (ICET), in particular, in collecting, archiving and distributing Earth tide records from long series of gravimeters, tiltmeters, strainmeters and other geodynamic sensors. >>>!!!<<< The ICET Data Bank contains results from 360 tidal gravity stations: hourly values, main tidal waves obtained by least squares analyses, residual vectors, oceanic attraction and loading vectors. The Data Bank contains also data from tiltmeters and extensometers. ICET is responsible for the Information System and Data Center of the Global Geodynamic Project (GGP). The tasks ascribed to ICET are : to collect all available measurements of Earth tides (which is its task as World Data Centre C), to evaluate these data by convenient methods of analysis in order to reduce the very large amount of measurements to a limited number of parameters which should contain all the desired and needed geophysical information, to compare the data from different instruments and different stations distributed all over the world, evaluate their precision and accuracy from the point of view of internal errors as well as external errors, to help to solve the basic problem of calibrations and to organize reference stations or build reference calibration devices, to fill gaps in information or data as far as feasible, to build a data bank allowing immediate and easy comparison of Earth tide parameters with different Earth models and other geodetical and geophysical parameters like geographical position, Bouguer anomaly, crustal thickness and age, heat flow, ... to ensure a broad diffusion of the results and information to all interested laboratories and individual scientists.
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
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>>>!!!<<<VENUS coastal network, is now part of the Ocean Networks Canada Observatory>>>!!!<<< VENUS is a cabled undersea laboratory for ocean researchers and explorers. VENUS delivers real time information from seafloor instruments via fibre optic cables to the University of Victoria, BC. You can see ocean data live, recent and archived as well as learn more about on-going research
IEEE DataPort™ is an online data repository created and supported by both the IEEE Signal Processing Society and the IEEE Big Data Initiative, and it enables data owners to upload their data without cost. DataPort makes data available in three ways: standard, open access, and data competition. By default, all "standard" datasets that are uploaded are accessible to paid DataPort subscribers. Data owners can also pay a fee (APC) to make a dataset accessible through open access to non-subscribers. The third option is to to host a "data competition" and make a dataset accessible for free for a duration with instructions on the competition and how to participate. DataPort provides workflows for receiving entries and managing the competitions. All datasets are stored on Amazon AWS S3, and each dataset can be allotted up to 2TB each.
The primary focus of the Upper Ocean Processes Group is the study of physical processes in the upper ocean and at the air-sea interface using moored surface buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors. UOP Project Map The Upper Ocean Processes Group provides technical support to upper ocean and air-sea interface science programs. Deep-ocean and shallow-water moored surface buoy arrays are designed, fabricated, instrumented, tested, and deployed at sea for periods of up to one year
SHARE - Stations at High Altitude for Research on the Environment - is an integrated Project for environmental monitoring and research in the mountain areas of Europe, Asia, Africa and South America responding to the call for improving environmental research and policies for adaptation to the effects of climate changes, as requested by International and Intergovernmental institutions.
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The MOSES Data Discovery Portal is the central component of the MOSES data management infrastructure. It holds the metadata of MOSES campaigns, sensors and data and enables high-performance data searches. In addition, it provides access to the decentral data repositories and infrastructures of the participating Helmholtz centers where MOSES data is stored.
The SAR Data Center has a large data archive of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from a variety of sensors available at no cost. Much of the SAR data in the ASF SDC archive is limited in distribution to the scientific research community and U.S. Government Agencies. In accordance with the Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) between the relevant flight agencies (CSA, ESA, JAXA) and the U.S. State Department, the ASF SDC does not distribute SAR data for commercial use. The research community can access the data (ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS-1, RADARSAT-1, and ALOS PALSAR) via a brief proposal process.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) is a component of NASAs Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). LP DAAC processes, archives, and distributes land data and products derived from the EOS sensors. Located just outside Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the LP DAAC handles data from three EOS instruments aboard two operational satellite platforms: ASTER and MODIS from Terra, and MODIS from Aqua. ASTER data are received, processed, distributed, and archived while MODIS land products are received, distributed, and archived.
The HEASARC is a multi-mission astronomy archive for the EUV, X-ray, and Gamma ray wave bands. Because EUV, X and Gamma rays cannot reach the Earth's surface it is necessary to place the telescopes and sensors on spacecraft. The HEASARC now holds the data from 25 observatories covering over 30 years of X-ray, extreme-ultraviolet and gamma-ray astronomy. Data and software from many of the older missions were restored by the HEASARC staff. Examples of these archived missions include ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, Compton GRO, HEAO 1, Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2), EUVE, EXOSAT, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, ROSAT, Rossi XTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton.
The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite measures the ozone layer in our upper atmosphere—tracking the status of global ozone distributions, including the ‘ozone hole.’ It also monitors ozone levels in the troposphere, the lowest layer of our atmosphere. OMPS extends out 40-year long record ozone layer measurements while also providing improved vertical resolution compared to previous operational instruments. Closer to the ground, OMPS’s measurements of harmful ozone improve air quality monitoring and when combined with cloud predictions; help to create the Ultraviolet Index, a guide to safe levels of sunlight exposure. OMPS has two sensors, both new designs, composed of three advanced hyperspectralimaging spectrometers.The three spectrometers: a downward-looking nadir mapper, nadir profiler and limb profiler. The entire OMPS suite currently fly on board the Suomi NPP spacecraft and are scheduled to fly on the JPSS-2 satellite mission. NASA will provide the OMPS-Limb profiler.
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The COSYNA observatory measures key physical, sedimentary, geochemical and biological parameters at high temporal resolution in the water column and at the sediment and atmospheric boundaries. COSYNA delivers spatial representation through a set of fixed and moving platforms, like tidal flats poles, FerryBoxes, gliders, ship surveys, towed devices, remote sensing, etc.. New technologies like underwater nodes, benthic landers and automated sensors for water biogeochemical parameters are further developed and tested. A great variety of parameters is measured and processed, stored, analyzed, assimilated into models and visualized.