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Found 23 result(s)
Seafloor Sediments Data Collection is a collection of more than 14,000 archived marine geological samples recovered from the seafloor. The inventory includes long, stratified sediment cores, as well as rock dredges, surface grabs, and samples collected by the submersible Alvin.
Seafloor data at these locations include multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution scanning altimetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar, seafloor digital photographs, sample locations, deep-towed magnetic data, and more. Each dataset is geospatially registered and incorporates metadata (e.g., sample geochemistry and time and depth of collection) that can be interactively accessed by the user. The user can control which datasets are shown on a map view of the area and the scale at which the map is viewed. Datasets with resolutions inappropriate for the scale at which they are being viewed are automatically removed from the map.
VentDB is an effort funded by the US National Science Foundation to build and operate a data management system for hydrothermal spring geochemistry that will host and serve the full range of compositional data acquired on seafloor hydrothermal vents from all tectonic settings. VentDB supports the preservation and dissemination of analytical data on hydrothermal springs and plumes. VentDB complements existing geochemical data collections such as SedDB and PetDB. VentDB can accommodate published historical data as well as legacy and new data that investigators contribute.
The Alvin Frame-Grabber system provides the NDSF community on-line access to Alvin's video imagery co-registered with vehicle navigation and attitude data for shipboard analysis, planning deep submergence research cruises, and synoptic review of data post-cruise. The system is built upon the methodology and technology developed for the JasonII Virtual Control Van and a prototype system that was deployed on 13 Alvin dives in the East Pacific Rise and the Galapagos (AT7-12, AT7-13). The deployed prototype system was extremely valuable in facilitating real-time dive planning, review, and shipboard analysis.
The WHOI Ship DataGrabber system provides the oceanographic community on-line access to underway ship data collected on the R/V Atlantis, Knorr, Oceanus, and Tioga (TBD). All the shipboard data is co-registered with the ship's GPS time and navigation systems.
The Fish Database of Taiwan is a complex of research data for about 25 years to the Lab of Fish Ecology and Evolution, which is situated in Biodiversity Research Center of Academia Sinica.
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>>>!!!<<<VENUS coastal network, is now part of the Ocean Networks Canada Observatory>>>!!!<<< VENUS is a cabled undersea laboratory for ocean researchers and explorers. VENUS delivers real time information from seafloor instruments via fibre optic cables to the University of Victoria, BC. You can see ocean data live, recent and archived as well as learn more about on-going research
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The task of WDC geomagnetism is to collect geomagnetic data from all over the globe and distribute those data to researchers and data users, as a World Data Center for Geomagnetism.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
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The TerMEx program addresses, within the framework of circum-Mediterranean cooperation, two sets of major challenges: (1) the scientific challenges of the Mediterranean deep Earth dynamics, its basin deposits and its interactions with climate, and (2) the societal challenges associated with natural hazards, resources and climate change. The database aims at documenting, storing and distributing the data produced or used by the TerMEx community. This community is not exclusive and we encourage researchers of associated and related programs in the Mediterranean (e.g. Actions Marges and ESF-TopoMed) to join-in the community.
The Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) is a leading research and engineering facility operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The observatory is located at South Beach and in the ocean a mile off the south shore of Martha's Vineyard where it provides real time and archived coastal oceanographic and meteorological data for researchers, students and the general public.
Jason is a remote-controlled deep-diving vessel that gives shipboard scientists immediate, real-time access to the sea floor. Instead of making short, expensive dives in a submarine, scientists can stay on deck and guide Jason as deep as 6,500 meters (4 miles) to explore for days on end. Jason is a type of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a free-swimming vessel connected by a long fiberoptic tether to its research ship. The 10-km (6 mile) tether delivers power and instructions to Jason and fetches data from it.
The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Data Portal, part of the US Antarctic Data Consortium, provides access to geoscience data, primarily marine, from the Antarctic region. The synthesis began in 2003 as the Antarctic Multibeam Bathymetry and Geophysical Data Synthesis (AMBS) with a focus on multibeam bathymetry field data and other geophysical data from the Southern Ocean collected with the R/V N. B. Palmer. In 2005, the effort was expanded to include all routine underway geophysical and oceanographic data collected with both the R/V N. B. Palmer and R/V L. Gould, the two primary research vessels serving the US Antarctic Program.
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GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel is one of the leading marine science institutions in Europe. GEOMAR investigates the chemical, physical, biological, and geological processes in the oceans, as well as their interactions with the seafloor and the atmosphere. OceanRep is an open access digital collection containing the research output of GEOMAR staff and students. Included are journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, theses and more, - with fulltext, if available. Research data are linked to the publications entries.
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
WHOI is the world's leading non-profit oceanographic research organization. WHOI maintains unparalleled depth and breadth of expertise across a range of oceanographic research areas. Institution scientists and engineers work collaboratively within and across six research departments to advance knowledge of the global ocean and its fundamental importance to other planetary systems. At the same time, they also train future generations of ocean scientists and address problems that have a direct impact in efforts to understand and manage critical marine resources.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
The MGDS Academic Seismic Portal at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (ASP-LDEO), now part of the IEDA Data Facility, was initiated in 2003 to preserve and provide open access to multi-channel seismic (MCS) and single channel seismic (SCS) field data collected for academic research supported by the US National Science Foundation. Multi-channel data are primarily from the marine seismic vessels operated by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Modern single channel seismic data from other vessels including the R/V Palmer and USCG Healy, as well as data from portable seismic systems, are also served. The data center is operated in partnership with the Academic Seismic Portal at UTIG (http://www-udc.ig.utexas.edu/sdc/), which focuses primarily on processed multi-channel seismic data, but also serves field data from programs conducted by UTIG investigators. The development of the Academic Seismic Portal has focused on the need to recover high value MCS data from older surveys as well as to establish sustainable procedures for preservation of data from modern programs. During the final two years of R/V Ewing operations, procedures were established for routine transfer of MCS data along with navigation and acquisition parameters, and other needed documentation to the ASP. Transfer of seismic data and acquisition information is now routine for the National Marine Seismic Facility, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, which began science operations in February 2008. Data are documented and incorporated into the data system with full access restrictions protecting the scientists' rights to exclusive access during the proprietary hold period. Submission of data to the ASP helps ensure that NSF requirements for data sharing as outlined in the NSF OCE Data Policy are satisfied.
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>>>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada is now part of Ocean Networks Canada and this website is being phased out. Please visit us on our new website at oceannetworks.ca >>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada, the North-East Pacific Time-series Undersea Networked Experiments, is the world's first regional scale cabled deep ocean observing network. It consists of an 800km network of electro‐optic cable laid on the seabed over the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, off the coast of British Columbia. This tectonic plate serves as an exceptional natural laboratory for ocean observation and experiments. NEPTUNE Canada instruments yield continuous real‐time data and imagery from the ocean surface to beneath the seafloor, and from the coast to the deep sea. They respond to events such as earthquakes, tsunamis, fish migrations, plankton blooms, storms and volcanic eruptions. NEPTUNE Canada offers a unique and exciting approach to ocean science.