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Found 175 result(s)
The National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) offers free web access to large collections of de-identified physiological signals and clinical data elements collected in well-characterized research cohorts and clinical trials.
The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study is an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study that has been tracking the health and development of 1,398 Pacific children and their parents since the children were born at Middlemore Hospital in South Auckland in the year 2000. It is the only prospective study specifically of Pacific peoples in the world.
Country
The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (The HUNT Study) is one of the largest health studies ever performed. It is a unique database of personal and family medical histories collected during three intensive studies. The fundamental strategy is to earn and maintain the confidence of the population we work in and with as is necessary for any successful population study. This strategy has been successful and has resulted in extraordinarily high participation rates. There is enthusiastic public and political support for HUNT and for the HUNT Research Centre. This has created a good basis for further health surveys in the county and an excellent research environment. Today, the HUNT Study is a database with information about approximately 120,000 people that integrates family data and individual data and can be linked to national health registries.
The Dallas Heart Study (DHS) is a multi-ethnic, population-based probability sample of Dallas County designed to define the social and the biological variables contributingto ethnic differences in cardiovascular health at the community level and to support hypothesis-driven research aimed at determining the underlying mechanisms contributing to differences in cardiovascular risk. The initial data collection from the population was performed in three sequential stages over a two year period(2000-2002) and included the collection of detailed socioeconomic, biomarker and imaging data from each participant. The underlying assumption of the study is that successful identification of new risk factors for cardiovascular disease will require the availability of an exquisitely phenotyped, multiethnic population in close proximity to the Center.
The MRC National Survey of Health and Development 1946 (NSHD) was the first ever British birth cohort study. It has collected information from birth to the current day on the health and life circumstances of five and a half thousand men and women born during a week in March 1946 throughout England, Wales, and Scotland. The study explores differences in child development by factors like social class, biological factors, health and education. Due to the length of the study it has developed into a study of ageing.
The Whitehall II study was established to explore the relationship between socio-economic status, stress and cardiovascular disease. A cohort of 10,308 participants aged 35-55, of whom 3,413 were women and 6,895 men, was recruited from the British Civil Service in 1985. Since this first wave of data collection, self-completion questionnaires and clinical data have been collected from the cohort every two to five years with a high level of participation. Data collection is intended to continue until 2030.
The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE) conducts epidemiological and health services research in diabetes among a large, multiethnic cohort of patients in a large, integrated health care delivery system.
ALSPAC is a longitudinal birth cohort study which enrolled pregnant women who were resident in one of three Bristol-based health districts in the former County of Avon with an expected delivery date between 1st April 1991 and 31st December 1992. Around 14,000 pregnant women were initially recruited. Detailed information has been collected on these women, their partners and subsequent children using self-completion questionnaires, data extraction from medical notes, linkage to routine information systems and from hands-on research clinics. Additional cohorts of participants have since been enrolled in their own right including fathers, siblings, children of the children and grandparents of the children. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the ALSPAC Ethics and Law Committee (IRB00003312) and Local Research Ethics.
The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, genetic information and health care expenditures.
The Twenty-07 Study was set up in 1986 in order to investigate the reasons for differences in health by socio-economic circumstances, gender, area of residence, age, ethnic group, and family type. 4510 people are being followed for 20 years. The initial wave of data collection took place in 1987/8, when respondents were aged 15, 35 and 55. The final wave of data collection took place in 2007/08 when respondents were aged 35, 55 and 75. In this way the Twenty-07 Study provides us with unique opportunities to investigate both the changes in people's lives over 20 years and how they affect their health, and the differences in people's experiences at the same ages 20 years apart, and how these have different effects on their health.
The Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study is following a cohort of nearly 5,000 children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 (roughly three-quarters of whom were born to unmarried parents). We refer to unmarried parents and their children as “fragile families” to underscore that they are families and that they are at greater risk of breaking up and living in poverty than more traditional families. The core Study was originally designed to primarily address four questions of great interest to researchers and policy makers: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?
Country
ZACAT is a social science data portal allowing you to search for, browse, analyse and download social science survey data, provided by GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences. ZACAT includes data from International Social Survey Programme (ISSP), Comparative Study of Electoral Systems (CSES), Eurobarometer, European Values Study (EVS), Studies from Eastern Europe, ALLBUS, Politbarometer (German documentation), Election Studies (Germany), Childhood, adolescence and becoming an adult, and LebensRäume.
The Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS) are population based studies of individuals aged 65 years and over living in the community, including institutions, which is the only large multi-centred population-based study in the UK that has reached sufficient maturity. There are three main studies within the CFAS group. MRC CFAS, the original study began in 1989, with three of its sites providing a parent subset for the comparison two decades later with CFAS II (2008 onwards). Subsequently another CFAS study, CFAS Wales began in 2011.
Country
Since 2003, data concerning material, slides and taxa, existing within the Friedrich Hustedt Diatom centre, are being entered in a database. In 2014, all data from the initial collection database have been transferred into a new system using the EarthCape platform. The web interface of this new system is now on-line but is incomplete. The database stores information on all specimens in the collection, named by Hustedt or deposited later by other workers, with the literature-, material- and slide-information. Taxon names have been entered as they appear on the slides or on a sheet in a slidebox, although in some cases, recently proposed names are given under “comments”. The database also has a complete entry of all of the publications held in the library of the centre, now more than 8,000.
Country
More than a quarter of a million people — one in 10 NSW men and women aged over 45 — have been recruited to our 45 and Up Study, the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere. The baseline information collected from all of our participants is available in the Study’s Data Book. This information, which researchers use as the basis for their analyses, contains information on key variables such as height, weight, smoking status, family history of disease and levels of physical activity. By following such a large group of people over the long term, we are developing a world-class research resource that can be used to boost our understanding of how Australians are ageing. This will answer important health and quality-of-life questions and help manage and prevent illness through improved knowledge of conditions such as cancer, heart disease, depression, obesity and diabetes.
The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study is one of the largest cohort studies in the world, with more than half a million (521 000) participants recruited across 10 European countries and followed for almost 15 years. EPIC was designed to investigate the relationships between diet, nutritional status, lifestyle and environmental factors, and the incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases. EPIC investigators are active in all fields of epidemiology, and important contributions have been made in nutritional epidemiology using biomarker analysis and questionnaire information, as well as genetic and lifestyle investigations.
In response to the declaration of the Zika virus as a public health emergency, LabKey has launched the Zika Open-Research Portal to help facilitate collaborative research. This portal provides a platform for investigators to make Zika research data, commentary and results publicly available in real-time. Projects are freely available to researchers. If you are interested in sharing real-time research through the Zika Open-Research Portal, please contact LabKey to get started.
Country
The Research Data Center (RDC) “International Survey Programs“ provides researchers with data, services, and consultation on a number of important international study series which are under intensive curation by GESIS. They all cover numerous countries and, quite often, substantial time spans. The RDC provides optimal data preparation and access to a wide scope of data and topics for comparative analysis.
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The Research Data Center for Higher Education Research and Science Studies (FDZ-DZHW) at the German Centre for Higher Education Research and Science Studies (DZHW) in Hannover provides the scientific community with quantitative and qualitative research data from the field of higher education and science studies for research and teaching purposes. The data pool of the Research Data Centre is based on two sources: Firstly, it contains the current surveys of the panels conducted in-house (especially DZHW Graduate Panel, Social Survey, DZHW Panel Study of School Leavers with a Higher Education Entrance Qualification, DZHW Scientists Survey), which are integrated by default. Secondly, the Research Data Centre constantly processes, documents and integrates inventory data of the DZHW and its prior organisations. External data from the research area is also integrated into the FDZ data pool.
Country
The Pain Genes Database is an interactive web-based data browser of pain-related transgenic knockout studies. It is designed to allow easy access to and analysis of the published pain-related phenotypes of mutant mice (over 200 different mutants at the date of submission). The database features two levels of exploration, one allowing the identification of genes by name, acronym, genomic position or "summary" phenotype, and the other allowing in-depth browsing, paper-by-paper, of specific phenotypes and test parameters. Hosted by the Department of Psychology and Centre for Research on Pain at McGill University.
The University has followed all of the children born in Aberdeen in 1921, 1936, and 1950-1956 as they grow and age. Collectively these groups are known as the ABERDEEN BIRTH COHORTS, and are a jewel in the crown of Scottish health research and have helped to advance our understanding of aging well. The Children of the 1950s study is a population-based resource for the study of biological and social influences on health across the life-course and between generations.
Country
KiGGS is a long-term study conducted by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) on the health of children and adolescents in Germany. The study repeatedly supplies data, representative of the country as a whole, on the health of under 18-year-olds. In addition, the children and adolescents of the first KiGGS study are repeatedly invited, and they continue to be monitored right into their adulthood.
The Growing Up Today Study is a collaborative study between clinicians, researchers, and thousands of participants across the US and beyond. The aim of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of the factors that affect health throughout life. Together we are working to building one of the most powerful resources for fighting cancer, obesity, heart disease, depression, and so much more.
The Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS), established in 1988, is a systematic longitudinal study enrolling HIV-infected individuals in Switzerland. It is a collaboration of all Swiss University Hospital infectious disease outpatient clinics, two large cantonal hospitals, all with affiliated laboratories, and with affiliated smaller hospitals and private physicians carrying for HIV patients. The Swiss Mother and Child HIV Cohort Study (MoCHiV) is integrated into the SHCS. It aims at preventing mother to child transmission and enrolls HIV-infected pregnant women and their children. The SHCS involves practically all researchers being active in patient-oriented HIV research in Switzerland. The clinics can delegate recruitment of participants and follow-up visits to other outpatient clinics or to specialized private physicians, provided that the requirements of the protocol can be entirely fulfilled and controlled. The laboratories can contract other laboratories for some of the analyses.